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    We're perpetually on a hunt for the perfect French market basket. Here are 10 we've noticed lately with subtle variations that make them distinctive in their own right.

    Beldi Market Basket with Pompoms | Remodelista

    Above: The Beldi Pom Pom Basket is handwoven in Morocco; £30 ($46.80)  from Cotton & Pearl. 

    Oblong Market Basket from Morocco | Remodelista

    Above: The Valencia Oblong Shopper Basket, made in Morocco, is $50 from Indigo & Lavender.

    Parisienne Stripe Market Basket | Remodelista

    Above: The Parisienne Stripe Basket is a traditional market basket with a strip of neon green (other colors available as well); handwoven in Morocco. Contact Bohemia Design for ordering information.

    Seville Basket | Remodelista

    Above: The Seville Basket, handwoven from palm leaves, offers a variation on the traditional French basket profile; €35 ($38.59) from Villa Bloemenhof.

    Garde Los Angeles Basket | Remodelista

    Above: The classic French Market Basket is trimmed in leather; €50 ($55.13) from the French Larder at the Cook's Atelier.

    Caravana Straw Tote | Remodelista

    Above: The Caravana Straw Tote, handmade by local artisans in Mexico, is $98.50 from Club Monaco.

    Orange Handled Market Tote | Remodelista

    Above: The Orange-Leather-Handled Market Tote from Greige is $39. (Simple Peace offers the same tote with leather handles in a range of colors, including gold and silver.) 

    Jeanne Beatrice Market Basket | Remodelista

    Above: La Vie Quinn Market Basket has leather-trimmed braided handles; $34 from Jeanne Beatrice.

    Eliza Gran Studio Pom Pom Basket | Remodelista

    Above: The Large Pom Pom Basket by Eliza Gran Studio of Venice, CA, is $87 and comes in several colors.

    Beldi Basket with Leather Trim | Remodelista

    Above: The Beldi Basket with Indigo Leather Handles is handwoven in Morocco; contact Bohemia Designs for ordering information. 

    Find more baskets in our post on Les Petites Emplettes, A Shop in a Chateau, and see how Sarah uses French Market Totes All Around the  House.

      For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

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    Several years before Columbus set out for America, a glassworks was set up at La Rochère, a mountainous area of timbered houses and waterfalls near the Swiss border of France. After a few false starts (a devastating fire followed by the Thirty Years' War), the furnace was relit in 1666 and has been going strong ever since. Over the centuries La Rochère has produced canning jars, medical equipment, window panes, and roof tiles, but the company is best known for its drinking glasses. La Rochère's wide range of glasses, plain and fluted, retain shapes that were as popular in 19th-century dining rooms as they are today. It's not difficult to imagine the local writer Victor Hugo and painter Gustave Courbet taking refreshment from La Rochère goblets while nibbling the area's famous Comté cheese at a rustic cafe.

    Today the company is run by the descendants of the 19th-century owners and sells its traditional hand-blown as well as more affordable pressed-glass ranges worldwide. Here's a selection of some utilitarian favorites.

    Pips Dish London | Remodelista

    Above: A table set with La Rochère glassware from the Perigord line at London popup restaurant Pips Dish (see London's Best Below-Stairs Lunch, Hoxton Edition). Photograph by Simon Bevan for Remodelista.

    Four to Buy

    La Rochere Perigord Drinking Glasses | Remodelista

    Above L: A set of six La Rochère Perigord Tall Drink Glasses is $65.48 from Amazon. Above R: A set of four Perigord Glass Water Tumblers is $40 from Posh Chicago. 

    La Rochere Ribbed Espresso Glass | Remodelista

    Above: A set of six La Rochèe Traditional North Africa Espresso Cups is $51.55 from Amazon; the same Espresso Glass is €4.50 ($4.95) at Merci.

    La Rochere Wine Glasses | Remodelista

    Above: A set of six 8-Ounce Balloon Decor Water Glasses is $51.86; a set of six 4.5 Ounce Balloon Decor Red Wine Glasses is $51.32; and a set of six La Rochère 2.5-Ounce Balloon Dessert Wine Glasses is $47.81, all from Amazon.

    La Rochere Iced Tea Glass | Remodelista

    Above: A set of six 15.2 ounce La Rochère Ouessant Iced Tea Glasses is $77 from Sur la Table.

    Object Lessons columnist Megan Wilson is the owner of Ancient Industries and the curator of the Remodelista 100, a collection of everyday essential objects presented in the Remodelista book. Have a look at her past lessons on iconic designs, including Cafe Ware from Duralex, La Rochère's competitor, and Le Parfait and Other Canning Jars.

    For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

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    Anishka Clarke and Niya Bascom of Brooklyn's Ishka Designs are an international duo—she grew up in Jamaica; he was born in London to Jamaican and Guyanese parents and raised in NYC. But neither had spent much time in Paris before Edouard, a French friend living in Brooklyn, came to them with an intriguing project: His childhood duplex near the Eiffel Tower—in a small late-19th-century building that originated as combination studios and living quarters for artisans working on the tower—needed editing and an overall update. Edouard's father is a sculptor, and the ground floor had been his studio surrounded by the family's hodgepodge living quarters. 

    Clarke and Bascom's job was to introduce order and a logical flow to upstairs and down—and to cull through decades' worth of art, photography, souvenirs, rock collections, and other memorabilia—"every scrap of it was meaningful to Edouard," says Clarke. The good news: When Edouard, a consultant, and his family aren't in town, they rent the apartment via Airbnb. Scroll down for details.

    Photography by Niya Bascom Photography.

    The Caribbean yellow front door to a Paris pied-a-terre updated by Ishka Designs of Brooklyn | Remodelista

    Above: "Edouard's wife is from the Caribbean, so we wanted to add a shot of brightness," says Clarke. The display of family treasures begins just beyond the entry: The low chair is one of several Edouard's mother brought home from travels in India. The sculpture above it is by Edouard's father, François Portelette.

    The designers' biggest challenge? "The language barrier," says Clarke. "We had to get by on long-ago French language classes and, when push came to shove, Google Translate. Construction and work permits were involved, and we collaborated with a local French architect and contractor. Our architect spoke little English but he walked around with a translation book. Thankfully, construction documents are universal.

    Caribbean Yellow stairs in a Paris pied-a-terre by Ishka Designs of Brooklyn | Remodelisat

    Above: The designers also cloaked the stairway in marigold (with deep green treads). Next to it, they introduced a dining area: "The apartment had only the world's tiniest kitchen table," Clarke told us. "We found the dining table tucked in another room, and we added rush-seated chairs to the ones that were already there." They bought the hanging light at a Paris flea market.

    Classic Paris artist's atelier remodeled for living by Ishka Designs of Brooklyn | Remodelista

    Above: The crowning glory of the duplex is its classic atelier—formerly François Portelette's studio—with 20-foot ceilings. Under the original window wall, the designers introduced cabinets for storing and displaying art. They added new hardwood flooring throughout. Most of the furniture belonged to Edouard's family, including the Indian carved wood chairs and the mod gray-upholstered design.

    The apartment's second floor has a loggia that overlooks the living space.

    Antique silver teapot in a Paris apartment remodeled by Ishka Designs of Brooklyn | Remodelista

    Above: Highlights from the apartment's teapot collection, formerly hidden in kitchen cabinets, are now on view in the living room.

    Classic Paris artist's atelier remodeled for living by Ishka Designs of Brooklyn | Remodelista

    Above: A large part of the project was curating the art, much of it by Portelette. In a corner of the living room, the designers propped a petrin, a wooden grape trough, and tucked a sculpture inside.

    Upstairs hall in a Paris pied a terre newly remodeled by Ishka Designs of Brooklyn | Remodelista

    Above: The upstairs floor has two bedrooms and two baths off a central hall

    Antique leather-bound books in a Paris apartment remodeled by Ishka Designs of Brooklyn | Remodelista

    Above:  A sampling of the apartment's antique books. (Clarke and Bascom also discovered collections of road maps and matchbooks.)

    Embroidered fauteuil on a loggia in a Paris apartment remodeled by Ishka Designs of Brooklyn | Remodelista

    Above: Several heirlooms, including an embroidered fauteuil and side table, made the cut on the loggia.

    The two-bedroom, two-and-a-half-bath apartment sleeps six and rents for $377 a night (four-night-stay minimum). See more of it on Airbnb.

    Go to Gardenista to explore Ishka Designs' landscape work in Before and After: A Modern Brooklyn Backyard on a Budget.

      For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

     

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    Last touched in the 1970s, this apartment in Paris's 19th Arrondissement was, according to architect Lina Lagerstrom, of Septembre, "divided into a lot of small rooms and in very bad shape." The owners, a young family of four, called in the Septembre team to create an open kitchen/living room in Scandinavian style with birch plywood, white paint, and a hint of mint.

    Photography by David Foessel.

    Paris kitchen remodel by Septembre Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The remodel was done for a creative couple, Sabine and Alexis—she's a graphic designer, he's a writer/comedian—who wanted a combination of "bright, lively, and cozy." Birch ply cabinetry defines the kitchen from the rest of the room, and the walls, ceiling, and floor are white ("painted floors are unusual; Parisians are used to their oak parquet," says Sabine). 

    Paris kitchen remodel by Septembre Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The carpentry is the work of Fred de Gasquet of FredFabric. The tall cupboards (which hide the fridge) surround the door to the bathroom.

    Paris kitchen remodel by Septembre Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The low perch dividing the kitchen and living area is a storage space with a removable wooden top for bottles of wine and water. Mint subway tiles and red light cords provide the requested color. See our posts on the Color Cord Company and Wrk-Shp for similar pendant lights.

    Paris kitchen remodel by Septembre Architects | Remodelista

    Above: A trio of mismatched chairs surround the marble-topped table. The white column was a surprise during construction: "We found a bearing post in one of the walls we planned to demolish," explains Sabine. "It was a big deal at first, but we got used to it—we even like it."

    Paris kitchen remodel by Septembre Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The double-exposure windows overlook the rooftops of the Right Bank. Sabine's final word: "It's a great place to cook while watching the kids—well-conceived and functional. And from the sofa, it offers a great view."

      Paris kitchen remodel by Septembre Architects | Remodelista

    Above: Septembre's plans show the bedrooms and bath off the kitchen and the spiral stairs to the roof.

    For kitchens with a similar palette, mint tiles included, see Steal This Look: A Mint Green Kitchen from a Scandinavian Stylist and Steal This Look: A Kitchen in Gothenburg, Sweden. Also check out 5 Favorites: Minty Bathrooms, Retro Edition.

    Thinking of building your own plywood kitchen? Read Remodeling 101: The Ins and Outs of Plywood. (And take a look at blue plywood here.)

    For more inspiration, browse the Kitchens in our photo gallery. (Search by color and materials to find the look you're after.)

    This post is an update; the original ran on February 27, 2015, as part of our Clean Living issue.

    Remodelista subscribe | Remodelista  

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    Louise Jourdan-Gassin, a Paris designer and flea market habitué, recently launched a line of stonewashed kitchen linens printed with vintage photos. Future heirlooms? We think so. 

    Serie Limitee Louise Dishtowels | Remodelista

    Above: The Marcel Tea Towel, available in white, natural, or mouse gray, is €24 ($26.23) from Serie Limitee Louise.

    Alder and Co. Linen Tea Towel | Remodelista

    Above: The coral Flower Tea Towel is $35 from Alder & Co. in Portland, Oregon.

    Serie Limitee Louise Dishtowels | Remodelista

    Above: The Fisherman Tea Towel, available in white, natural, or mouse gray, is €24 ($26.23) from Serie Limitee Louise.

    Yellow Homard Tea Towel | Remodelista

    Above: The Omar Tea Towel comes in yellow curry, white, natural, and mouse gray; €24 ($26.23).

    Alder and Co Homard Apron | Remodelista

    Above: The Lobster Apron is $60 from Alder & Co.

    Share our weakness for new-old kitchen linens? Take a look at Sir/Madam's Mash Note Napkins and Nostalgia Now from Falconware.

    For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

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    New from French company Andrée Jardin: a line of kitchen essentials for pristinely prepped vegetables. "These daily utensils encourage us to prepare fruits and vegetables in a healthful way," the company says. 

    Andre Jardin Cutting Board | Remodelista

    Above: Designed by Ionna Vautrin (an alumna of the Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec office), the beechwood Cutting Board has a sleek profile. The smaller size (30 by 19 by 3.6 centimeters) is €40 ($43.75) and the larger (37 by 23.5 by 3.6 centimeters) size is €50 ($54.69).

    Les Jardins Vegetable Brush | Remodelista

    Above:  "Water and a vegetable brush are your best friends," the Andrée Jardin team says. "Instead of peeling, submerge your vegetables in water and scrub with the appropriate brush to remove bacteria, pesticides, and any traces of residual soil."

    Collection Ionna Vautrin Mushroom Brush | Remodelista

    Above: The Small Soft Brush€10 ($10.94), is designed for cleaning mushrooms, tomatoes, peaches, apricots, and more.

    Collection Design by Ionna Vautrin for Andree Jardin | Remodelista

    Above: The Medium Brush€11 ($12), is for zucchini, eggplant, cucumbers, and apples. 

    Andree Jardin Large Vegetable Brush | Remodelista

    Above: The Hard Brush, €12 ($13.13), is for potatoes, radishes, carrots, turnips, and other root vegetables. 

    Andrée Jardin makes equally nice cleaning accessories—see our Domestic Science and Design-Worthy Dustpans and Brooms posts.

    For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

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    A self-taught ceramic artist, Justine Lacoste has a degree in anthropology, which, she says, trained her to pay attention to the tiniest details. Inspired by things such as pastry wrapper folds and the weave of a dish towel, her pieces have a poetry about them that has us enchanted. 

    Photography by Epure-Justine Lacoste, unless otherwise noted.

    Epure-Justine Lacoste handmade porcelain from France | Remodelista

    Above: Did someone say idyllic? After working for a series of potters and mold makers, Lacoste established her own studio, Epure, in a centuries-old barn on a farm in Brittany, where she lives and works with her husband, Jean: "I focus on the creative side and Jean on the production. We do everything: the ceramics, photography, website, selling, cooking, and not sleeping."

    Epure-Justine Lacoste handmade porcelain from France  | Remodelista

    Above: Porcelain wares and molds—made from an old English milk bottle (see below)—on a much-used old workbench in the studio. 

    Justine Lacoste Potter in France | Remodelista

    Above: Lacoste's designs are available directly from Epure. Though the online shop only gets updated every few months (stay tuned for new pieces in September), the couple takes orders on request and Lacoste posts her latest work on Instagram (@epurejustinelacoste). Shown here, her signature Canelé collection of hand-shaped porcelain serving dishes, which are also available from French online shop Le Repère des Belettes, starting at €12.50 ($13.66) for a Mini Starry Pot. All are dishwasher and microwave safe.

    Epure-Justine Lacoste handmade porcelain hanging light from France | Remodelista

    Above: The Canelé Light, €155 ($169.41), in a matte or glazed finish, hangs from a cloth-covered twisted cord.

    Justine Lacost-Epure handmade patterned porcelain serving boards | Remodelista

    Above: Porcelain serving boards in an array of impressed patterns are ideal for hanging.

    Epure-Justine Lacoste handmade porcelain vases from France | Remodelista

    Above: Lacoste's bottle-shaped Point Vases, some with subtle gold detailing, are priced from €23 to €37 ($25.14 to $40.44).

    JEpure-Justine Lacoste handmade porcelain bowls and plates from France | Remodelista

    Above: Canelé Bowls (L) are available on request from Epure, and Star Plates (R) are in stock at Le Repère des Belettes, starting at €27.50 ($30). Photograph via Le Repère des Belettes.

    Epure-Justine Lacoste handmade linen-textured Limoges porcelain plates from France | Remodelista

    Above: Handmade Limoges porcelain Plats Trame Lin are textured with old linen, €38 ($41.53) and €45 ($49.18). 

    Epure Ceramics | Remodelista

    Above: Milk Bottles for serving drinks or displaying flowers are €26 ($28.42) each. Photograph via Le Repère des Belettes.

    We found Lacoste's work by chance, but it turns out it's a small world: Her neighbor Mathilde Labrouche of Pierre Coté makes Painterly Porcelain Plates, and her friends Isabelle Dubois-Dumee and Hubert Bettan run Les Petites Emplettes, A Housewares Shop in a Chateau

    Go to Ceramics to see more of our favorites, including Janaki Larsen's Pottery at Le Marche St. George in Vancouver and Rustic Italian Planters by Flò.

    For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

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    Used on a daily basis, our dishwashers are subjected to a near constant barrage of food, soap, and grease. Over time all this grime takes its toll in the form of mildew, hard water stains, soap scum buildup, and those mysterious bits of goo wedged in crannies and floating on the bottom. Yuck! When that happens, it's time to give this workhorse of a machine its own thorough cleaning.

    Here's how.

    Photography by Justine Hand for Remodelista.

    How to Clean a Dish Washer, supplies, Remodelista

    Supplies

    • White vinegar
    • Baking soda or borax
    • Small cleaning brush, such as a toothbrush
    • Toothpick or wooden skewer
    • Cloth rags
    • Bowls large enough to soak dishwasher parts
    • Screwdriver (only needed if you have parts with screws)

    Instructions for Cleaning a Dishwasher

    How to Clean a Dishwasher, step 1, Remodelista

    Step 1: Remove the trays and utensil holder, so that you can access all of the inner workings of the dishwasher. If necessary, use a screwdriver to take out parts that need cleaning. 

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 2, Remodelista

    Step 2: Clean all removable parts by soaking them and scrubbing as needed.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 3, Remodelista

    Above: Immerse removable pieces in a bath of soapy hot water.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 2b, Remodelista

    Above: While other parts are soaking, give any areas that have extra mildew or hard water stains a vigorous scrub using baking soda and a toothbrush. For extra whitening power, you can mix in some hydrogen peroxide, which combines with baking soda without any harmful effects.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 5, Remodelista

    Step 3: Clean the interior.

    Sprinkle more baking soda (or borax, see below) over the soap dispenser and other nonremovable parts. Scrub these areas with your toothbrush and for particularly tight areas, use a toothpick or wooden skewer. Be sure to check the water holes to make sure they're clear of debris. Also inspect and clean the bottom and drain area of the machine.

    Note: In place of baking soda, you can use borax (sodium borate). A naturally occurring mineral powder commonly used in detergents— and sold on its own as a laundry booster—borax kills mold, deodorizes, and whitens.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 6, Remodelista

    Above: Rinse your toothbrush and apply vinegar to clean the rubber seal around the edges of your machine. Be sure to work the bristles in-between the lining to get at mildew and food deposits.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 5, Remodelista

    Above: Using a rag soaked in vinegar, gently clean the front and sides of the door, including the controls area.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 11, Remodelista

    Step 4: Replace the parts you removed and run your machine using nothing but vinegar.

    Vinegar, or acetic acid, is an excellent cleaner useful for sanitizing, polishing metal and glass, killing mildew, and dissolving soap scum. To harness this power in your dishwasher, pour two cups of vinegar on the bottom of the machine.

    Important note! Never mix vinegar with bleach when cleaning your machine—or anything else. Doing so will release toxic chlorine and chloramine vapors. Also never use bleach or any cleaner containing chlorine (hydrochloric acid) in a stainless steel machine. It can stain and corrode the metal. 

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 9, Remodelista

    Above: Run the machine on the sanitize or hot cycle.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step 12, Remodelista

    Step 5: As a final polish, give your machine a baking soda cycle.

    Sodium hydrogen carbonate, or baking soda, is also a good cleaning agent, useful for getting rid of odors, removing grease, and whitening stains. (But don't mix it with vinegar! As a base, baking soda will neutralize this acid and visa-versa, canceling out the positive effects of both.)

    If your machine is still not clean after the vinegar cycle, add one cup of baking soda to the bottom and run again. I like to alternate between a vinegar bath one month and baking soda the next. For machines that suffer from mineral deposits and stains due to well water, it may be necessary to use a dishwasher-safe stain and rust remover.

    You can also use borax to clean your machine. The beauty of borax is that it can be applied while there are dishes in the machine. Simply load your dishwasher as usual, add 1/4 cup of borax to the bottom, add normal detergent to the dispenser, and run as usual. Your glasses will sparkle.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, Step final detail 2, Remodelista

    Above: A clean machine ready for work.

    How to Clean Your Dishwasher, finished, Remodelista

    Above: Maintain a clean dishwasher by repeating this process once a month.

    Get your whole house gleaming with these easy care tips:

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Congratulations to the 60 finalists in the third annual Remodelista + Gardenista Considered Design Awards!

    In June, you sent us more than 800 projects, ranging from colorful kitchen overhauls to budget bathroom DIYs and even a remodeled schoolhouse. It's been by far the best work we've ever received. We've pored over 4,500-plus photos and, in partnership with our guest judges, have picked finalists—our five favorite projects—in each category. Without further ado, visit the Remodelista Finalists and Gardenista Finalists to see who's made it to our final round.

    Now you decide who wins: Vote once per day in each of the six Remodelista and six Gardenista categories now through August 15. Set a daily reminder to vote once a day in all 12 categories. 

    Since winners will be chosen by public vote, the success of each finalist depends on your help. Share your favorite projects using the social sharing tools embedded during voting, and share the link to the voting page to encourage friends to make their own voices heard.

     

    Note: We'll govern fair play to the best of our ability using IP addresses, but please be honest in your voting. One vote per person per category each day.

    Congratulations to our finalists. Now go make your vote count!

    DIY Color Blocked Clock | Remodelista

    Above: From designer Molly Madfis, an easy DIY: A Color-Blocked Wall Clock for $25.

    Learn more about the 2015 Remodelista + Gardenista judges: 

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    Cécile Roederer's giant online department store Smallable has been called the Net à Porter for kids. She founded the site in 2008, when she was pregnant with her son, Charles, and she's been on a roll ever since—in addition to fashion and toys, the store offers a full range of European children's furnishings, from tepees to teen desks. 

    How does the doyenne of petite French design herself live? We dropped in on her and her husband, Pierre, and their son in their grand but playful late-19th-century Paris apartment in the Haut Marais.

    Photography by Pierre Rochand via Smallable, except where noted.

    Cecile Roederer of French children's fashion and design website Smallable at home with her son in Paris | Remodelista

    Above: Cécile and Charles on an Indian hand-embroidered leopard throw by Lindell & Co. from India Mahdavi, one of Cécile's regular shopping haunts for her apartment. (Other favorites: Merci, Caravane, and Sarah Lavoine.)  

    Smallable Apartment in Paris | Remodelista

    Above: The apartment is in a late-19th-century Haussmannian building with original details intact. "We've been living here for over 10 years, so we've renovated almost everything at some point, but we haven't touched the layout or any of the fundamental aspects." Photograph via Little Years.

    Classic Paris family apartment belonging to Cecile Roederer, founder of French children's fashion and design online shop Smallable| Remodelista

    Above: "You don’t need very much to decorate this type of apartment," Cécile tells us. "The trap, in my opinion, is to overdo the classicism and the Second Empire aspect by adding furniture from the same era. I like to have more contemporary, edgy pieces while keeping a certain sobriety."

    The sofa is a made-in-France Cinna design; the zebra came from Design et Nature, "two steps from the Place de Victoire; it's less well-known than Deyrolle, but still essential." Every room has an item or two from Smallable; here it's the cowskin rug. Photograph via Little Years.

    Classic Paris family dining room belonging to Cecile Roederer, founder of French children's fashion and design online shop Smallable| Remodelista

    Above: Hicks Hexagon, a David Hicks wallpaper design from Cole & Son, and a Jason Miller Modo Chandelier set a mod tone in the dining room. The table, with an Ioanna Vautrin vase, is surrounded by Cherner chairs. The chevron floors are original "and, incidentally, in need of being restored in certain places," says Cécile. "They're very sensitive to light, so we've ended up with strong contrasts between the different strips."

    (Go to our parquet post to learn how to spot the difference between Chevron and Herringbone, and take a look at Atelier du Granges's Geometric Wood Flooring from France.)

    Galley kitchen in Paris belonging to Cecile Roederer, founder of French children's fashion and design online shop Smallable| Remodelista

    Above: An original glass-paneled door sections off the galley kitchen while allowing in light.

    Classic Paris family apartment belonging to Cecile Roederer, founder of French children's fashion and design online shop Smallable| Remodelista

    Above: Prints by Julien Colombier hang outside Cécile and Pierre's room (and hint at the wallpaper to come). The wool Tiger Rug is by Dylan Martorell by Moustache.

    Paris boudoir of Cecile Roederer, founder of French children's fashion and design online shop Smallable| Remodelista

    Above: Cole & Son's Palm Jungle, a seven-color wallpaper, creates a tropical headboard wall. 

    Paris boudoir belonging to Cecile Roederer, founder of French children's fashion and design online shop Smallable| Remodelista

    Above: An inset bookcase takes the place of a bedside table. The lights are Original BTC Hector Table Lamps that Cécile brought home from the office.

    Paris boy's room belonging to Cecile Roederer, founder of French children's fashion and design online shop Smallable| Remodelista

    Above: Charles's room holds a changing array of Smallable's bestsellers, including Offi's Woody Table with a chalkboard top and storage recess in the center. Photograph via Little Years.

    Paris child's room belonging to Cecile Roederer, founder of French children's fashion and design online shop Smallable| Remodelista

    Above: A bed by Leander of Denmark. Cécile is continually expanding her company's reach. She's begun offering furniture for the whole family and hopes to make Smallable a familiar name in the US. Photograph via Little Years.

    Take a look at another Grand but Understated Paris Flat that we love.

    On Gardenista, explore Odorantes, a Parisian Florist Where Flowers Are Arranged by Scent.

      Cast your vote for the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    "Who doesn't love a Cinderella story?" asks Michelle. This week, she and the Gardenista team present a series of garden projects with happy endings.  Most thrilling of all: a look at Grey Gardens now. 

    DIY painters drop cloth pergola | Remodelista

    Above: 10 Ways to Improve Your Garden with a Pergola (the one shown here is a DIY project made from painter's drop cloths).

    Japanese washi paper lantern | Gardenista

    Above: 10 Easy Pieces: Tabletop Candle Lanterns.

      Manufactum Hammock | Remodelista

    Above: Object Lessons: The Classic Hammock.

    Indoor cedar shed | Gardenista

    Above: Out of the Closet: A Luxe Shed as Cedar Closet.

    Grey Gardens now | Gardenista

    Above: Grey Gardens: The Resurrection of Ben Bradlee's Grand Estate. For more Before and Afters, see A Grande Dame in LA's Hancock Park and A Modern Brooklyn Backyard on a Budget

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    The ultimate job for a Francophile? Laurie Furber, Bay Area–based founder of online housewares emporium Elsie Green, travels to Lyon, France, three times a year to scout for vintage wares. Lyon, the country's third-largest city, is "a bit more low key than Paris and has a great design scene," she says. "The color palette of the city is beautiful, and it's filled with dramatic sculptures, churches, hand-painted frescoes, a Roman amphitheater, and a mix of medieval, Renaissance, and modern architecture. There's a great blend of old and new (the city is 2,000 years old), a vibrant food scene (it's where Paul Bocuse and Daniel Boulud got their starts), and a rich silk production history dating from the 1800s." Here's a roundup of Laurie's favorite haunts.

    Favorite Hotels

    Hotel College in Lyon | Remodelista

    Above: "The most design-y option is the Hotel Collège; the owners spent three years searching for vintage school desks and benches to create a classroom and dorm atmosphere. I often stay at the bare-bones Hotel Saint Vincent on the river. It's not fancy in the least, but the owner serves the best breakfast and is warm and welcoming. It's like staying with your favorite old uncle." 

    Favorite Restaurants

    Bistro Potager in Lyon | Remodelista

    Above: "Le Bistrot du Potager has a great bar and wine list; perfect for a casual lunch or dinner."

    L'Institution Restaurant in Lyon, France | Remodelista

    Above: "L'Institution is an iconic Lyon establishment, built in 1864 and overhauled in 2013 by Jacques Garcia. Another old-school classic is Brasserie Georges, which has the largest dining room in Europe and was established in 1839. They have two seatings, you have to be on time, sit down like a civilized person, and eat what they bring."

    Gourmand St. Jean in Lyon, France | Remodelista

    Above: "Le Gourmand de Saint Jean: Lyonnaise specialities served at a sidewalk cafe."

    Favorite Shops

    Hyggelig in Lyon | Remodelista

    Above: "Hyggelig is a high-end concept store with a Scandinavian twist. Simple silhouettes, playful patterns and colors."

    Pop and Shoes in Lyon, France | Remodelista

    Above: "Pop and Shoes is the best clothing/shoe shop in Lyon, and the best place to spot home design trends. It's also a great place for a quick café crème." 

    Bensimon Concept Store in Lyon | Remodelista

    Above: "Bensimon, the French fashion brand, has a nice home collection. Sort of a cool West Elm."

    August Cocotte in Lyon | Remodelista

    Above: "August et Cocotte has a nice blend of vintage and new housewares."

    Terreaux Bricolage in Lyon, France | Remodelista

    Above: "Terreaux Bricolage, a Lyonnaise hardware store, has cloth lamp cord in a range of colors and cool furniture."

    Galeries du Desordre in Lyon, France | Remodelista

    Above: "Galerie du Desordre is a very well curated and quirky little gallery of finds from around Europe. The color palette will make you swoon."

    Les Puces du Canal in Lyon, France | Remodelista

    Above: "Le Village des Containers Les Puces du Canal is on the outskirts of town; each tiny antiques shop occupies its own shipping container."

    For a guide to Paris's most happening restaurants, go to Expert Advice: 11 Under-the-Radar Parisian Dining Spots.

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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote for the finalists in each of 12 Considered Design Awards categories, on both Remodelista and Gardenista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 15.

    In the Best Professional Living/Dining Space category, our five finalists are Alterstudio Architecture, Larson and Paul Architects, Alterstudio Architecture, Studio [D] Tale, CWB Architects, and Lang Architecture. 

    Project 1

    Alterstudio Architecture | Austin, Texas | Bouldin Residence

    Design Statement: "The Bouldin Residence is a compactly designed two-story house that takes advantage of views to a private walled pool courtyard that acts as a buffer to the busy front street and a large protected live oak tree in the back."

    Chosen by: Remodelista editor in chief Julie Carlson, who says, "The compact living/dining area has an open, airy feel thanks to the floor-to-ceiling windows overlooking the pool area. Indoor/outdoor living at its best."

    Alterstudio | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Living room with view out to the pool area."

    Alterstudio | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The front entry opening into the living room is demarcated with inset reclaimed wood flooring."

    Alterstudio | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The palette consists of raw materials like concrete, steel, and glass."

    Alterstudio | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The pool court."


    Project 2

    Larson and Paul Architects, LLP | New York
, NY | Hudson Valley Escape

    Design Statement: "A well-thought-out Hudson Valley getaway." 

Interiors with NLGB

 design. Photography by John Gruen.

    Chosen by: Guest judge and designer/stylist Estee Stanley, who said, "I love the color scheme and the casualness of this home. It feels really relaxed but still edgy."

    Larson & Paul Architects | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Sliding doors open the living room to the rolling meadow and forest beyond."

    Larson & Paul Architects | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Larson & Paul Architects | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Larson & Paul Architects | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

     


    Project 3

    Studio [D] Tale | London, UK | Peponi House

    Design Statement: "Peponi House is an African-inspired home for a Kenyan client living in London. Imbued with rich natural materials and contrasting textures, the living space is designed to create a warm inviting feeling. A feature fireplace centers the space and bespoke joinery tucks away items discretely."

    Chosen by: Julie Carlson, who says, "This interior is so unexpected and refreshing; I love the mix of vibrant colors and how personal the space feels thanks to the owner's art and objet collections."

    Studio [D] Tale | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The living room. Joto, noun—heat."

    Studio [D] Tale | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Vintage furniture and collectibles."

    Studio [D] Tale | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Coffee table reading and Zanzibari coral."

    Studio [D] Tale | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Bespoke joinery with handmade leather pulls."


    Project 4

    CWB Architects | Brooklyn, NY | Brooklyn Heights Tailored Modern

    Design Statement: "This home in Brooklyn Heights needed a complete gut renovation and the new owners wanted a functional, tailored space to enjoy with their family members and guests. There was no need for a formal dining room, but rather a connected space for hanging out and entertaining."

    Chosen by: Estee Stanley, who had this to say about the project: "I love the vibe of this home. It's pretty traditional with a whiff of modern and edgy. I love how homey and warm it feels, while also managing to be elegant and beautiful."

    CWB Architects | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "View of living from dine-in kitchen."

    CWB Architects | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "View of dine-in kitchen from living room with custom banquette seating in a new bay window overlooking the garden."

    CWB Architects | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Dining area at kitchen."

    CWB Architects | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Custom wall unit for linens and additional plating zone."


    Project 5

    Lang Architecture | Kerhonkson, NY | Hudson Woods

    Design Statement: "Set amid forests and meadows, Hudson Woods aims to blend modern design seamlessly with natural surroundings. Taking its cue from midcentury values, the home maintains a level of simplicity and functionality while employing rustic elements drawn directly from the area and resulting in a warm interior setting."

    Chosen by: Guest judge Estee Stanley, who says: "This design is perfection to me. Everything about it—every piece of furniture goes so well with the space; it's so soothing and warm. Well designed and tasteful."

    Lang Architecture | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "View toward dining area in the great room with mahogany framed window."

    Lang Architecture | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Gabled window wall with white oak ceiling and exposed beam construction."

    Lang Architecture | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Lang Architecture | Remodelista 2015 Considered Design Awards

    Found your favorite? Vote once per day in each of 12 categories across both sites, now through August 15.

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    Here's what we've been obsessing over this week.

    Helena Emman's Spoons | remodelista

    • Above: Artist Helena Emman's opalescent spoons made in Skye, Scotland.
    • A few things to keep in mind before listing your house on Airbnb
    • This weekend Renegade Craft Fair hits San Francisco at the Fort Mason Center. 

    Sharktooth naturally dyed muslin blanket | Remodelista

    • Above: Naturally dyed muslin blankets from Sharktooth in Brooklyn.
    • Actor Jeff Bridges recently listed his 9,000-square-foot Montecito, California, villa for $29 million.
    • Beautifully designed book covers.

    FvF Dinner at Californiacation House in LA | Remodelista

    • Above: Our friends at Freunde von Freunden collaborated with vacation rental site One Fine Stay to host a summer dinner at the Californication House in LA. 
    • Pantone color swatches paired with tiny objects. 
    • A modern stool with a textile touch.

    Remodelista Instagram Pick of the Week: @liz_robb

    • Above: For a closer look at fiber artist Liz Robb's work, we're following her on Instagram (@liz_robb). 

    Remodelista Pinterest Pick of the Week: Melanie Abrantes

    Above: Home Sweet Home inspiration from designer Melanie Abrantes, a Remodelista Market vendor. 

    Go to Bastille Week to catch up on our latest posts, and check out Gardenista's Before and After issue. 

    Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Vote once per day through August 15

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    This week we're celebrating the pared-down, minimalist-leaning life, from a zero-waste restaurant in the UK to a budget kitchen renovation in New Zealand. 

    Simple Life Cover Image | Remodelista

    Above: Photograph via Saar Manche, a lovely lifestyle blog by an illustrator who lives in the Netherlands.

    Monday

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield | Remodelista  

    Above: Christine visits 2015's Best House of the Year, a minimalist country manor in the UK, in our Architect Visit column.

    Tuesday

    Susan Connor Textiles | Remodelista  

    Above: In Tuesday's Fabrics & Linens spotlight, Izabella checks out a line of summery textiles by a Brooklyn designer.

    Wednesday

    Fisher Paykel Refrigerator Drawers | Remodelista

    Above: In 10 Easy Pieces, Margot rounds up the best refrigerator drawers out there.

    Thursday

    Blackbird Kitchen Remodel | Remodelista

    Above: Our Kitchen of the Week is a cost-conscious DIY remodel in New Zealand.

    Friday

    French Bicycle Rack | Remodelista

    Above: In Storage news, we're admiring a chic bicycle rack from France.

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    A UK property developer aspires to reinvent the country pile on a wooded chalk escarpment of more than 300 square miles in the Chiltern Hills. Enter the renowned British architect David Chipperfield, who has a reputation for being historically attuned and place specific (think the breathtaking reconstruction of Berlin’s Neues Museum). Chipperfield's solution was to restore the landscape and rethink the country house concept.

    He removed the existing two-story house and various outbuildings and then embedded a new minimalist, single-story structure, Fayland House, into the landscape, creating a large, three-bedroom house with expansive views of the surrounding countryside. Bold and foolhardy, maybe, but this innovative design gesture was noticed by the jurors of the AR (the UK’s Architectural Review magazine) House Awards last month when they awarded it first prize for Best New House of the year. Glorified wartime bunker or ingenious minimalist manor house? You decide.

    Photography by Simon Menges via Dezeen, unless otherwise noted.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Rik Nys | Remodelista

    Above: Fayland House is embedded into a densely wooded site in Chiltern Hills, near Henley on Thames. "On the one hand, the house appears as a natural escarpment in the landscape, while on the other it affirms itself as a manmade structure expressed by the robust brick columns placed in front," writes the architect on his website. Photograph by Rik Nys via David Chipperfield.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Simon Menges | Remodelista

    Above: Minimalist details and a calming neutral palette continue throughout the house.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Simon Menges | Remodelista

    Above: The design makes the most of the far reaching views of the surrounding countryside.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Simon Menges | Remodelista

    Above: Rough and smooth: The texture of the exposed white brick walls contrasts with the polished terrazzo floors.

    Fayland House Kitchen by David Chipperfield | Remodelista

    Above: A view into the kitchen.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Simon Menges | Remodelista

    Above: With four sunken internal courtyard spaces, Fayland House has an abudance of natural light, even in the bathroom.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Rik Nys | Remodelista

    Above: Views of the countryside are accessible from the internal courtyard. Photograph by Rik Nys via David Chipperfield

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Simon Menges | Remodelista

    Above: The minimalist architecture provides framed views of the trees in the courtyard.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Simon Menges | Remodelista

    Above: The reinstating of the landscape included removing conifers and suburban plantings, and restoring native hedgerows as well as introducing areas of new native woodland plantings.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Rik Nys | Remodelista

    Above: The grand stairs typically associated with a manor house have been turned 90 degrees and come down the side of the colonnaded loggia, which stretches across the whole width of the house. Photograph by Rik Nys via David Chipperfield.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Photo by Rik Nys | Remodelista

    Above: The subtle colors of the English countryside as viewed from a minimalist loggia. Photograph by Rik Nys via David Chipperfield.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Site Plan | Remodelista

    Above: Fayland House is embedded on the site in a field facing southwest toward the valley.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Floor Plan | Remodelista

    Above: The plan of Fayland House shows the main living spaces opening onto the loggia, while ancillary rooms, further into the house, open onto smaller courtyards.

    Fayland House by David Chipperfield in Chiltern Hills, United Kingdom, Model photo by Richard Davies | Remodelista

    Above: A model of Fayland House illustrates its relationship to the landscape. Photograph by Richard Davies via David Chipperfield.

    Want to channel a minimalist manor in your home? In April, David Chipperfield launched a collection of Minimal Furniture inspired by the countryside. For more British minimalism, see the work of a Chipperfield protégé Jonathan Tuckey in The Life Aquatic: A London Mews House for a Submariner and Divine Intervention: The Providence Chapel in Wiltshire.

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    "We like to make the kitchen design process easy for our customers so they don't have to make too many decisions," says Helen Parker, creative director of British kitchen company deVol. "Up to now, we've usually sourced our brass taps from antiques fairs or eBay. We love the look of them, but it became a bit of a pain trying to source these antique ones, so we knew we had to create an aged brass tap ourselves."

    Working with UK fixture specialists Perrin & Rowe, Helen and her team developed the perfect vintage-looking brass kitchen mixer faucet and related designs. "After many months of meetings and logo designs and samples, we came up with the deVol aged brass taps of a very specific tone," she says. "We don't usually offer our accessories to customers who aren't installing a deVol kitchen, but these are too good to keep a secret, so we're offering them to everyone. Give us a call at deVol if you want to know more."

    Perrin and Rowe Faucet for deVol | Remodelista

    Above: The Perrin & Rowe Ionian Mixer for deVol in aged brass is £435 ($678). Contact deVol directly for ordering information. 

    Perrin and Rowe Faucet for deVol | Remodelista

    Above: "We've also sourced matching strainers from Shaws of Darwen," Helen says.

    Perrin and Row Faucet for deVol | Remodelista

    Above: A detail of the porcelain tap logo.

      Perrin Rowe Mayan Taps for deVol | Remodelista

    Above: The Mayan Aged Brass Faucet is £295 ($459.86). Contact deVol directly for ordering information. See more of the company's designs in our posts on DeVol's London Showroom and New Sebastian Cox–Designed Kitchen.

    For more good faucet options, go to 10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Go-To Traditional Kitchen Faucets, and if you're after something more contemporary, see 10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Go-To Modern Kitchen Faucets.

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    Douglas McMaster, a veteran of forward-thinking international kitchens such as Greenhouse by Joost in Melbourne, Australia, and St. John in London, is on a crusade to create the world's most sustainable restaurant. "I want to completely cut out the middleman and go directly to the suppliers, only buying or producing what is naturally in season," he says in an interview with Vice. "I call it a pre-industrial food system. It's a way of producing, sourcing, and respecting food like we did 100 years ago. The production of waste has been eliminated by simply choosing to trade directly with farmers, using reusable delivery vessels, and choosing local ingredients that themselves generate no waste."

    The extreme environmentalism carries over in the interior. McMaster enlisted local firm Baines & Fricker, a husband/wife team, to design the restaurant's dining room. 

    Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

    Above: The restaurant's exterior has a giant sliding barn door. "Their waste-avoiding initiatives are exhaustive and startling," says The Guardian. "They cultivate their own mushrooms in discarded coffee grounds. If you want a receipt, it's emailed."

    Silo Cafe in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

    Above: A view of the dining area.

    Bertha Composter at Silo Composter | Remodelista

    Above: The cafe's composting machine, which is front and center in the dining room, turns 60 kilos of organic waste into compost in 24 hours, eliminating the need for bins. Local businesses are encouraged to bring in their waste to be composted and extra compost is available free to members of the community.

    Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

    Above: The tabletops are made out of reclaimed industrial floor tiles.

    Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

    Above L: A magnetic utility wall serves as a pot rack. Above R: Plates are made from recycled plastic bags.

    Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

    Above: An array of baked goods on offer.

    Silo Cafe in Brighton | Remodelista

    Above: Repurposed drain pipes (planted with wheatgrass) are mounted haphazardly on the white painted brick walls. 

    Silo Cafe in Brighton, England | Remodelista

    Above: Laser-cut coasters by Jim Wilson of Brighton Arts College are made from building material offcuts. 

    Silo Cafe Table in Brighton | Remodelista

    Above: Designers Baines & Fricker used legs from unwanted school tables for the dining tables. The seating is made from pulped wood waste. Photograph by David Charbit.

    Silo Restaurant in Brighton, UK | Remodelista

    Above L: McMaster has named his wooden flour mill from Austria "Gertrude." Above R: A freshly baked loaf.

    Silo Restaurant Mission Statement | Remodelista

    Above: The mission statement.

    For more information, go to Silo Cafe

    Check out another European cafe with a noble mission: Restaurant as Social Experiment: 28 Posti in Milan.

      Cast your daily vote for the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015!

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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote for the finalists in each of 12 Considered Design Awards categories, on both Remodelista and Gardenista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 15.

    In the Best Professional Bath Space category, our five finalists are DISC Interiors, Imperfect Interiors, Ensemble Architecture, DPC/Elizabeth Roberts Design, Daleet Spector Design, and Kirsten Grove. 

    Project 1

    Kirsten Grove | Boise, ID | Farmhouse Bathroom Reno

    Design Statement: "This 1920s farmhouse bathroom got a major renovation. Subway tiles and black hexagon tiles on the floor create a fresh, modern look in a timeless country space."

    Chosen by: Guest judge and Bright Bazaar blogger Will Taylor, who said, "I loved this space because it feels like a story of contrasts: The walnut vanity stands out beautifully against the white metro tile and walls, which, in turn, pop against the black hexagonal floor tile. The exposed wooden roof is a nice introduction of rough texture, and the bare wood ladder adds a gentle organic touch."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "This walnut vanity by Kohler was the perfect juxtaposition for the rest of the space."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The large window gives off the most beautiful natural light." 

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Every farm bathroom needs a farm cat." 

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A barn style light hangs over the large soaker tub."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The wood ceiling is a nice natural detail in the space."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Take a bath here."


    Project 2

    Daleet Spector Design | Los Angeles, CA | Jeffery Residence Children's Bath

    Design Statement: "This remodel transformed a bathroom shared by two young boys. Space was taken from neighboring bedrooms to create room for a separate shower and tub, and double sinks. Located near the water, the style is beachy yet modern and age–appropriate, but will withstand the test of time."

    Chosen by: Will Taylor, who had this to say about the project: "Given my love of graphic color, I couldn't help but be delighted by the floor tile. I like that it's colorful but not juvenile, despite being designed for kids. The wooden vanity adds warmth to the blue-and-white scheme."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Double vanity and tub."


    Project 3

    Ensemble Architecture, DPC / Elizabeth Roberts Design | Brooklyn, NY | Fort Greene Townhouse

    Design Statement: "The townhouse is located on a park block in Fort Greene, Brooklyn. The building was in a dilapidated state when the owners purchased it. The house was completely transformed by a full gut renovation, plus a new addition at the rear."

    Chosen by: Remodelista editor in chief Julie Carlson, who said: "This ensemble is the ideal refuge for city dwellers. I love the fact that the sink/shower/toilet are separate from the bathroom and dressing area. There's an airy orderliness to each space, and there's plenty of built-in storage, but it doesn't feel at all intrusive."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A frameless glass shower panel with dark marble hex tiles."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A view from the dressing room to the tub room."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The tub room."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The tub room vanity and built-in storage."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A view to the sink and shower from the tub room."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Porcelain tub, soft wood floors, and window to street beyond."


    Project 4

    Imperfect Interiors | London, UK | Victorian Family House London

    Design Statement: "This four-bedroom Victorian house had been last fitted in the eighties and needed updating. Encaustic and crackle glaze tiles were used to add texture and color and to prevent the spaces from looking too clinical, as was bespoke wooden paneling. Reclaimed Victorian sinks, a claw foot bath, and a marble ledge added luxury." 

    Chosen by: Julie Carlson, who said: "A nicely restrained evocation of Victorian splendor. I'm charmed by the idea of a bathroom as art gallery (that big window must help chase away the dampness), and the paneling and palette are details I'd like to copy."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Claw-foot bath, encaustic tiles, and custom wooden paneling make this an inviting retreat."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A rich dark gray tone was used in here to make the space feel cozy."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Frosted double doors allow light to flood into the shower room, painted a rich gray."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Above: "A gallery of French oil paintings and antique photographs picked up from European flea markets." 


    Project 5

    DISC Interiors | Los Angeles, CA | Manhattan Beach Master Bathroom

    Design Statement: "This master bathroom was designed for a beach house that is casual, rustic, and modern. We incorporated concrete tile that evokes beach sand and a neutral palette for the finishes. It has a freestanding tub, oversized shower, custom cabinetry in oak, and white barn door."

    Chosen by: Will Taylor, who commented: "The way the neutral tile references the sand from the surrounding natural environment is a beautiful touch in this pared-back scheme. The freestanding tub and vanity help to maintain the light, airy, clean feel of the space. I like the fact that it feels luxurious yet understated."

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Best Bath Finalist in the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Found your favorite? Vote once per day in each of 12 categories across both sites, now through August 15.

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    Spotted (and envied) on the Style Files: a closet converted into a practical utility space, complete with a sink and homemade built-in shelving. Styled by Dutch interior designer Kim Timmerman, it's the perfectly ordered and sparkling extra storage everyone could use. Here, a look at the closet and how to re-create it. 

    A Dutch Small Utility Closet I Remodelista

    Above: A utility room that serves as a space for storing kitchenwares and washing up, it's tidily covered in white tiles and kitted out with shelves resting on brackets made from pegs. The same pegs are used as simple hooks over the sink. One of reasons the setup is so pleasing to the eye is its simple palette of black, white, and gray. Photograph by Louis Lemaire Fotografie.

    Steal This Look with these elements:

    American Standard All Purpose Sink in Porcelain I Remodelista  

    Above: The American Standard All-Purpose Sink is designed be wall hung and measures 22 by 30 by 9.5 inches; $680.16 from Amazon. 

    Element of Design Vintage Wall-mounted Faucet I Remodelista  

    Above: The Elements of Design Vintage Wall-Mounted Vessel Sink Faucet with Double Cross Handles has a 9.75-inch spout reach from the wall; $113.99 in polished chrome via Wayfair. 

     

    Antonius Shelf by Ikea I Remodelista

    Above: Ikea offers several basic white shelving options. The Ekby Hemnes, 31 1/8 inches wide and 7 1/2 inches deep, is $14.99 each. Companion brackets also available.

      Building Blocks made into Hooks I Remodelista

    Above: To create shelf brackets and wall hooks, consider Wooden Building Blocks or a Hardwood Dowel cut into the desired lengths and painted white. Drill a hole in the back of each, insert a screw, and attach to the wall using anchors.

    See our post DIY Instant Hallway Hooks Made from Blocks for tips.  For readymade options, take a look at 11 Favorites: Pegboard Storage Organizers and 6 Wooden Storage Pegs

    Kaico Coffee Pot I Remodelista  

    Above: The Kaico Coffee Pot by designer Makoto Koizumi is made in Japan of enamel-coasted steel with a maple knob; $130 from Emmo Home.  

    Staub Cast-Iron Mini Cocotte in Matte Black from Williams-Sonoma I Remodelista  

    Above: The French-made Staub Cast-Iron Mini Cocotte in matte black is currently on sale for $70 (marked down from $93) at Williams-Sonoma. Looking for more options? See 10 Easy Pieces: Cast Iron Dutch Ovens and The World's Most Beautiful Dutch Oven (By Way of SF).

    Amber Glass Jug I Remodelista

    Above: The One Gallon Amber Glass Jug with a handle and cap is $8.69 from My World Hut. 

      Hanging storage basket from A and B Design Studio on Etsy | Remodelista

    Above: A 6-inch-deep crocheted Hanging Storage Basket is $25 from Etsy seller A&B Design Studio of Arizona. Shown here in cream; other colors available.

    Above: 

    Pair of Scissors from Brook Farm General Store I Remodelista

    Above: These Scissors are made by a Chinese scissor and knife company in business since 1663; $16 from Brook Farm General Store. 

    Dessert Bowl in Onyx by Heath Ceramics I Remodelista  

    Above: Sized for ice cream, the Dessert Bowl in onyx is part of the Heath Coupe Line designed in the 1940s; $25 from Heath Ceramics. 

     

    The Ilse Container in Brass for Georg Jensen I Remodelista  

    Above: The Ilse Container is an all-brass receptacle designed by Ilse Crawford for Georg Jensen; $275 via The Future Perfect. 

    Ceramic pitchers from Yield Design | Remodelista

    Above: Matte on the outside, high gloss inside, Yield Design's Ceramic Pitchers come in gray or white; $95. See the design put to use as a French press in our post Beautiful Brew

    If, like us, you love looking at storage options, peruse our image gallery of Laundry & Utility Rooms. Also see our post 10 Easy Pieces: Inventive Wood Wall Hooks

    Cast your daily vote for the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015!

    This post is a rerun; the original ran on December 2, 2013 as part of our Early Bird issue.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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