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    Mat Collishaw, an instrumental if lesser known figure in the YBA movement (think Tracy Emin, Damien Hirst, and Sarah Lucas), creates art that by turns seduces and repulses. Art to him is not about beauty or perfection; the point is to get people to think about real issues. By extension, a tour of his home, a former pub in Camberwell, London, reveals a related approach. This is a man who engages with his personal environment on a practical and functional level. 

    For more, see Collishaw's studio spaces and an interview with him by Freunde von Freunden. 

    Photography by Antoine Breant for Freunde von Freunden.

    Mat Collishaw, white paneled living room, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: To convert what had been a pub and more recently a photo studio, Collishaw hired a crew and took down some walls. He then painted all his rooms white and applied a dark stain to the wood floors.

    Mat Collishaw, living room, antler horns, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: The furnishings are spare but comfortable.

    Mat Collishaw, decaying lilies in front of mirror, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: "I don't agree with the cosmetic look flowers have been given," Collishaw says. "For example, if you look around and see birthday cards with drops of dew on the petals—this image has killed them."

    Mat Collishaw, living and dining room, dark wood floors, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: Diffused light comes into the house through simple blinds. (Learn where to source your own at Remodelista 101: Roller Blinds.)

    Mat Colishaw Bird Remodelista

    Above: A taxidermy pheasant as decor.

    Mat Collishaw, Living Room, wood table with flowers in corner, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: Windows without curtains provide maximum light.

    Mat Collishaw, kitchen, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: Collishaw in his fuss-free kitchen. 

    Mat Collishaw, chalkboard, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: The kitchen chalkboard bearing the artist's grocery list and a sketch.

    Mat Collishaw, kitchen, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: A small work surface and counter provide a separation between the living area and the kitchen. 

    Mat Collishaw, white Aga in kitchen, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: Over the Aga, Collishaw lines up his spices and other essential cooking ingredients on an open shelf for easy access.

    Mat Collishaw, toaster and kettle on black kitchen countertop, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: Appliances and utensils sit on the counter as they are, with no attempt to hide them away.

    Mat Collishaw, cast iron tub, white subway tile, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: A metal hat and coat rack provide towel storage over the bathtub.

    Mat Collishaw, pub exterior, Camberwell, London | Remodelista

    Above: The exterior of the Victorian pub that Collishaw calls home. "I’d prefer to live in Camberwell in South London, which is still under development, and have space, rather than to live with the people who have their little hats on with their little bikes," Collishaw says. "Let me have my space!" Go to Mat Collishaw to see his work.

    If you're planning a trip to London, a visit to The Draper's Arms, a gastropub in Islington, is a must. Check out some of our other favorite London hangouts in our City Guides. 

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

    This post is an update; it originally ran on October 14, 2013, as part of our Handyman Special issue.

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    We're delighted to introduce the second of our guest judges in this year's Remodelista Considered Design Awards: Will Taylor, the creator of lifestyle blog Bright Bazaar.

    Will Taylor Bright Bazaar | Remodelista

    A UK native who lives in London, Will is a self-described "gentleman hooked on hue"—he founded Bright Bazaar in 2009 with the motto "Beige is boring." His site features interiors profiles and home styling tips, and last week, he unveiled a redesigned Bright Bazaar to showcase two more of his passions: travel and fashion. (In the photo above, Will shows readers how to wear bright primary colors.) 

    Last year, Will published his first book, Bright Bazaar: Embracing Color for Make-You-Smile Style. The Amazon best seller is now out in five languages, and Will is currently at work on his second book. 

    To keep up with Will, go to Bright Bazaar and join his devoted followings on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, and more than 2.5 million followers on Pinterest

    9 Things to Know About Will 

    Cities I've Lived in: London, Cardiff, and Cheltenham, UK. 

    Biggest Design Influence: Jonathan Adler.

    Schoolhouse Electric Cafeteria Tray | Remodelista

    Favorite Shop: Schoolhouse Electric. Shown above, the new fiberglass Cafeteria Tray made from an original vintage mold; $24.

    Favorite Artist: David Hockney. 

    Favorite Work of Architecture: Madrid Airport.

    Last Item I Bought for My House: Just yesterday, I purchased a handmade dish by a Japanese ceramicist on the sidewalk in Paris!

    Latest DIY Project: A pair of ombre curtains for my office.

    On My Wish List for My House: An Eero Saarinen Tulip Table.

    Last Art Exhibit I Saw: Mary Heilmann: Sunset at the Whitney Museum in NYC.

    Styling by Will Taylor

    Bright Bazaar Living Room | Remodelista

    Above: On Bright Bazaar, Will shares images of a UK furniture factory making his cloud blue Jonesy Loaf sofa

    Bright Bazaar Dining Room | Remodelista

    Above: Will hung a vintage turquoise factory pendant light in a recent redecoration of his dining room.

    Will Taylor of Bright Bazaar | Remodelista

    Above: He paired a striped rug from Dash & Albert and a Scandinavian console table in his hallway.

    Bright Bazaar Bedroom | Remodelista

    Above: In a recent bedroom update, Will added a 1940s campaign table sourced from a Paris flea market.

    Read a profile of fellow awards judge Estee Stanley, and don't forget to enter your projects into our design awards contest by June 22. 

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    A good kitchen faucet can be hard to find. To take the guesswork out of shopping for fixtures, we asked members of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory for their all-time favorite modern versions. Their picks run from high to low, some surprisingly affordable.

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: For clients on a budget, Tim Whitehill of Alterstudio Architecture in Austin likes the clean lines of the Grohe Concetto faucet, which starts at $183.37 on Amazon. Cameron Helland of SF architecture firm Sagan Piechota seconds the pick, and Remodelista contributor Izabella Simmons chose the Concetto for her own kitchen (see High/Low: Dornbracht vs. Grohe Kitchen Faucet). 

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: Alice Park of Park McDonald architects in LA chose the made-in-Italy Paini Cox faucet as her affordable pick. (N.B.: Paini is also known as La Toscana in the US.) The faucet starts at $231 at Quality Bath. 

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: Jerome Buttrick of Buttrick Wong Architects likes the Wall-Mounted Pot Filler Faucet from Chicago Faucets; it has hot and cold lever handles and a double-jointed spout; $243.28 at Faucet Direct. (It's also the faucet Remodelista editor in chief Julie has in her kitchen; see 10 Easy Pieces: Editors' Favorite Kitchen Faucets.) 

     

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: Tim Whitehill of Alterstudio recommends the Blanco Alta Single Lever Faucet at the lower end of the price range; $284.11 at Quality Bath. 

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: Lauren Rubin of NYC firm Lauren Rubin Architecture always opts for function first in kitchen faucets. "Most of our clients are families and the faucet will get well used," she says. Her pick is the Hansgrohe Talis S 2-Spray Kitchen Faucet for its clean lines and functionality. (It's shown here in chrome; Rubin recommends the Steel Optik finish to keep fingerprints at bay.) Starting at $297.65 on Amazon. 

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: Cameron Helland of Sagan Piechota likes the Minta Touch pull-down faucet from Grohe, starting at $417.56 for the chrome finish from Faucet Direct. 

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: Jennifer Beningfield of Openstudio Architects in London uses the Axor Citterio faucet from Hansgrohe in budget-conscious projects; $440.64 on Amazon. 

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: Celeste Robbins of Robbins Architecture in Winnetka, Illinois, is a fan of Dornbracht's entire line of faucets—but her favorite is the Meta.02; $875.06 at Quality Bath. (For the wall-mounted version, see Faucets & Fixtures: Dornbracht Meta.02 Kitchen Faucet.) 

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: The Tara Classic Single Lever faucet from Dornbracht is the hands-down favorite of the architects we polled: It's the first pick of Tim Whitehill and Alice Park, and loved by Krista Schrock of DISC Interiors and Jon Handley of Pulltab Design for having "classic lines and being beautifully made." The Tara starts at $913.64 in polished chrome at Quality Bath.  

    10 Easy Pieces: Architects' Favorite Modern Kitchen Faucets | Remodelista

    Above: Arne Jacobsen's Vola Faucet is the choice of Openstudio's Jennifer Beningfield and SF architect Amee Allsop. Says Allsop: "It's a timeless classic designed in the 1960s." Above L: The Vola in an Openstudio project. Above R: A black-finished Vola in a kitchen by Allsop. Starting at $1,346.25 for the two-handled faucet at Quality Bath. For the Vola in living color, see 11 Favorites: Vola Faucet Color Splash, Kitchen and Bath Edition

    More faucet shopping guides to consider: 

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    "The craziest part was actually buying the building as a renovation in the first place; everyone else thought it should be demolished." Designer Jacek Kolasiński is talking about the crumbling farm structure in his hometown of Szczecin, Poland, that he spent two years reinventing as his bright white, Nordic-accented dream house. 

    A restaurateur and Scandi furniture collector, Kolasiński learned his trade creating his own clubs and cafes, which led to a career shift as a full-time interior designer with a carpentry studio that makes bespoke furniture (his firm is called Loft). We discovered Kolasiński's work via his Sexy, Minimalist Remodel in Berlin, an hour-and-a-half north of Szczecin. Next, he invited us to take a look around the family forge, which he shares with his wife, a biology professor at the University of Szczecin, and their teenage daughter.

    Photography by Karolina Bak.

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland | Remodelista

    Above: A courtyard designed by Kolasiński opens off the back of the house. Located on the edge of a forest just 10 minutes from the Szczecin city center, the setup is rural—"we have visits from wild animals daily," says Kolasiński—without being remote.

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland

    Above: Kolasiński and his wife planted a border of birch and cypress trees along with hydrangea and wisteria, and in the summer, they add "loads of seasonal plants in pots—at my wife's request, all flowers are white."

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland

    Above: The century-old structure now has lime plaster walls and new windows. The courtyard patio opens to the living room and kitchen, and the Loft workshop is located on the other side of the old brick wall.

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland

    Above: The opened up interior is 1,500 square feet: "We had to do a lot of demolishing and most of the ceilings were liquidated," says Kolasiński, "the ones in the living room are now six meters [19.6 feet] high." Like most of the furnishings, the sofa is Scandinavian—it's by Bo Concept and "already very old but very comfortable." The hanging light is the Caravaggio by Cecilie Manz, a design we singled out in the Remodelista 100.

    Jacek-Kolasinki-of-Loft-Szczecin-converted-forge-Szczecin-Poland-Remodelista-9.jpg Above:

    Above: After re-creating the interior, Kolasiński cloaked it all in a custom-mixed warm white ("pure white blended with several shades of gray") and added a Danish oil finish to bleach the pine floors. "So much white may seem cold, but in reality it's very cozy, thanks to all the light that comes through the many windows," says Kolasiński. The newly inserted stair, which leads to his daughter's room, had to fit in a very narrow space and is one of his proudest design feats.

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland

    Above: In the dining area, a Vitra table is surrounded by Danish midcentury chairs—one of Kolasiński's firm's specialities is restoring Scandi classics, some of which he sells at Loft. Like the suspended white radiators? We do, too—see Remodeling 101: Wall-Panel Radiators.

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland

    Above: A bit of black anchors the family's gathering spot. For advice on picking the right shade of white, see Remodeling 101: How to Choose the Perfect White Paint and 10 Easy Pieces: Architects' White Paint Picks.

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland

    Above: Part of a separate forge building now connected to the main house by a corridor, the kitchen pairs original detailing, chimney included, with lacquered white cabinetry designed by Kolasiński. The counters are oiled slab MDF and the floor is marble tile with radiant heating.

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland

    Above: The multi-domed pendant lights, one at each end of the counter, are by Jorn Utzon ("he's the Danish architect who designed the Sydney Opera House," says Kolasiński) and came from Danish company Lightyears. Like all the lighting in the house, they were purchased on family trips to Copenhagen—"we go often; it's close to us and is my favorite city."

    Designer Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Szczecin's converted forge in Szczecin, Poland

    Above: A pale wood table and open shelving are incorporated into the brick-walled space. The appliances are by Smeg. Jacek-Kolasinki-of-Loft-Szczecin-converted-forge-Szczecin-Poland-Remodelista-9.jpg Above:

    Above L and R: The cocoon-like master bedroom, with a closet hidden behind white glass doors, has a bed frame from Muji. The tripod lamp is the Radon Floor by Hans Sandgren Jakobsen from Lightyears.

    Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Saczecin converted forge in Szczecin, Poland | Remodelista

    Above: A Radon Table lamp on the room's glass-topped desk. 

    Jacek Kolasinki of Loft Saczecin converted forge in Szczecin, Poland | Remodelista

    Above: To keep things looking orderly (and pale), Kolasiński stacks design magazines with the page-side out (but admits that it's not the best system for being able to find a specific issue). The Hanging Teak Monkey is a Danish classic designed in 1951 by Kay Bojesen, who also created the National Flatware of Denmark.

    See Kolasiński's custom furniture in a Sexy, Minimalist Remodel in Berlin.

    For more historic house overhauls, peruse our Remodel & Renovation posts. Two favorites: A Romantic Atelier in Japan and a DIY Zen Remodel in LA. And see LA designer Michaela Scherrer's "Whiter Shade of Pale House" (and read her case for monotone living) in the Remodelista book.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    We have more than a few serious home chefs in our circles. Here's a roundup of ideas for the perfect present for the man in the kitchen.

    Trnk Coffee Set | Remodelista

    Above: The Glass Coffee Carafe Set includes a glass carafe that does double duty (it holds the stainless steel filter and also functions as a serving carafe); a stainless steel reusable coffee filter; and a plastic holder for measuring coffee; $52 from Trnk. (Also see How to Brew a Better Cup of Coffee by Tariq Dixon, one of the founders of Trnk.)

    Blackline Cutting Board from Josh Vogel | Remodelista

    Above: Joshua Vogel's Blackline collection is a new favorite around here. His Cutting Boards come in small, large, and paddle-size (the 8-by-16-inch small, shown here, is $175).

    Fisherman Tea Towel Alder & Co. | Remodelista

    Above: Made in France, the screen-printed Fisherman Tea Towel features an image from a vintage photograph; $36 from Alder & Co.

    Maille Trousseau Roasting Pan | Remodelista

    Above: Made of sandstone, black enameled Malle W. Trousseau Browning Pans are $76 for the medium size (8.25 by 10 by 2 inches) and $105 for the large size (10.25 by 12 by 2) at March in SF.

    Hagino Mitsunobu Kitchen Tools | Remodelista

    Above: Designed by architect Hagina Mitsonubu for the FD Style collection, FD Style Kitchen Tools start at $40 for the FD Style Bottle Opener and go up to $75 for the FD Style Can Opener from Lekker Home. The tools are made of stainless steel with a matte black fluorocarbon polymer coating.

    Borough Furnace Cast Iron Skillet | Remodelista

    Above: Borough Furnace of Syracuse, New York, offers a lifetime-lasting, made-to-order 12-inch Braising Skillet for $320.  

    Handmade Portland Growlers from Guideboat | Remodelista

    Above: Handmade Portland Ceramic Growlers are available in black and white; $68 from Guideboat in Mill Valley, California.

    Go to Kitchen Accessories to see more of our favorites, including 6 Stylish Wood Knife Racks and Stainless Steel Water Fustis, Italian Edition.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    Sebastian Cox, a graduate of England's University of Lincoln (and, interestingly enough, a former DJ), founded his bespoke furniture company in 2009 with a mission to "design and make simple, elegant, honest furniture from British hardwoods." In a short time, he has become a leader in the UK craft revitalization; he has collaborated with Terence Conran on the craft-made Benchmark collection and worked on a line for Heal's, while also carrying out his own work.

    His latest project? An urban rustic kitchen for English kitchen maker deVol, made of sawn and woven sustainable timbers with copper accents (cabinet pulls and sink). "If we can develop a product that possesses subtle evidence of craft, then I believe it resonates with a customer's primitive maker urges," he told Dezeen. "I believe in looking both forward and backward."

    Sebastian Cox Kitchen for Devol | Remodelista

    Above: The kitchen is installed in deVol's Cotes Mill showroom in Leicestershire, England. The sawn cabinet doors are stained with inky blue-black dye, which preserves the natural character of the wood. 

    Sebastian Cox Kitchen for Devol | Remodelista

    Above: "The whole kitchen is designed to look like it breathes," Cox says. "It feels clean, simple, and light, but it's also brimming with texture."

    Sebastian Cox Kitchen for Devol | Remodelista

    Above: The wall-mounted cabinet features a back panel of woven wood slats. 

    Sebastian Cox Kitchen for Devol | Remodelista

    Above: The countertop is made from "a lovely big piece of solid oak"; the sink is pounded copper.

    Sebastian Cox Kitchen for Devol | Remodelista

    Above: Mounted antlers serve as dish towel rack.

    Sebastian Cox for Devol Kitchens | Remodelista

    Above: The backsplash is simple white-painted brick. 

    Sebastian Cox Kitchen for Devol | Remodelista

    Above: Stained wood cabinetry contrasts with the natural wood cabinetry under the sink.

    Sebastian Cox Kitchen for Devol | Remodelista

    Above: A drawer detail.

    Sebastian Cox Kitchen for Devol | Remodelista

    Above: An inky blue-black stained freestanding cabinet.

    Sebastian Cox for Devol Kitchens | Remodelista

    Above: The cabinet has a woven back panel.

    For more info on the kitchen, go to deVol and visit the maker at Sebastian Cox.

    We're kitchen design addicts, we admit it. What are we most excited about? This fledgling line from Berlin, the latest crop of minimalist British kitchens, and the new timber kitchen.

    Considered Design Awards RM | Remodelista

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    Established in 1962, Robert Long Lighting, a company once known for bench-made modernist takes on classic fixtures, has been revived by the founder's son and namesake. Robert Long Jr. grew up only knowing his father via his designs—both parents and other family members were killed in a car accident when Robert was just two, and he and his brother were raised by relatives in Savannah, Georgia, in a house illuminated by Robert Long lights.

    As a young adult Robert discovered his father's company catalogues in a pile of family memorabilia and "they planted a seed." When he moved to the Bay Area to go to graduate school in psychotherapy, he began showing the catalogues to architects and designers on the side. The interest was immediate: "One of the first people I talked to wanted to place an order for an entire hotel." Eventually Robert teamed up with an industrial designer in his eighties who had worked alongside his father—and Robert Long Lighting was switched on again. Headquarters are in the old shipyard in Sausalito, California, just 40 steps from the original studio, and within waving distance of another great 1960s comeback, Heath Ceramics.

    Robert Long Lighting in Sausalito | Remodelista

    Above: The majority of Robert Long Lighting designs are exact replicas of the originals—and look entirely of the moment. Robert has been able to track down many of the artisans who made lamp parts for his father, including a family of glassblowers, and they've begun contributing to the new pieces, all of which are assembled in Sausalito.

    The unlacquered brass Oliver Chandelier holds six candles (in spring-loaded holders to make replacement easy) and has eight-inch glass shades; $2,600, including 18 dripless wax candles.

    Robert Long Lighting in Sausalito | Remodelista

    Above: The company takes orders by email and phone and offers a range of materials and finish choices for each design. For instance, the Gordon Wall Bracket, $700, is available with clear or "seedy" glass and two versions of oxidized brass.

    Robert Long Desk Lamp | Remodelista

    Above: Made of solid brass components with a cast-iron weighted base, the George Table Lamp, shown here in oil-rubbed bronzed, also comes in seven other finishes, including polished nickel and oxidized copper; $1,450.

    Robert Long Lighting in Sausalito | Remodelista

    Above: A detail shot. Robert Long designs are made to order and generally take four to six weeks; they ship with light bulbs included.

    Robert Long Lighting in Sausalito | Remodelista

    Above: The cast-brass and copper Evergreen Sconce, $650, is a new design that makes use of existing elements from the collection.

    Robert Long Lighting in Sausalito | Remodelista

    Above: The Cooper Sconce has a 10-inch handblown glass globe mounted on cast brass (available in six finishes) with a copper bulb base; $775.

    Robert Long Lighting in Sausalito | Remodelista

    Above: A contender for revival: a vintage Robert Long Bronze Chandelier from 1st Dibs.

    Robert Long Lighting in Sausalito | Remodelista

    Above: The cast-bronze Owens Desk Lamp, $750, has two light sources: a visible bulb and a concealed down light (plus a three-way switch, so the lights can be on individually or together). The blown-glass sphere, shown here in clear, comes in a range of other options including etched and opal. 

    Stay tuned: The company is currently working on lighting for the forthcoming Workstead-designed hotel in Charleston. See the full collection at Robert Long Lighting.

    Find Classic Black Metal Sconces, Montreal-made Streamlined Lighting, Ikea Phone-Charging Lights, and much more in our Lighting archive. 

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    Nicole Hollis drew upon Seattle’s rich history of lumber, gold, and sea trading for inspiration in her design for the interiors of the new Palladian Hotel. Housed in a 1910 landmark in happening Belltown, the building provided Hollis and team with an ideal backdrop for her layerings of natural materials such as marble and wood accented with velvet upholstery and metallic touches. The results? A decidedly gritty-glam look befitting the city. 

    Photography by Laure Joliet

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: The landmark building offers iconic views across the Puget Sound.

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: Hollis cloaked the lobby in the deep blues and greens of Puget Sound. The restored terrazzo floors are original to the building.

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: In the moody library, the fireplace is stacked with antique books.

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: Reclaimed marble from Seattle's old King Street Station lines the stairway walls. 

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: Glimmers of gold can be spotted throughout the hotel. 

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: Hollis furnished the rooms like lofts, mixing antique area rugs with leather-bound books and old-fashioned telephones. The leather sling chair is by Sit and Read.

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: The custom lighting throughout the hotel is the work of Ladies & Gentlemen Studio (a Seattle duo who recently decamped to Brooklyn). On the wall is a crocheted Mega Doily Rug made of oversized cotton rope, also by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio.

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: Brass accents are a staple throughout the hotel, including this kitchen suite. 

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: The custom platform beds have reclaimed wood headboards with brass rivets and inset shelving. Celebrity portrait throw pillows (of David Bowie and Bill Murray, among others) introduce interesting bedmates.

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: Vintage city maps and pieces by local artists decorate the walls.

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: The bathrooms feature custom vanity stands with brass fixtures and vintage-inspired mirrors. 

    Palladian Hotel in Seattle with Interiors by Nicole Hollis | Remodelista

    Above: Bathroom floors are lined with classic hexagonal marble tiles, and the larger suites have clawfoot tubs.

    For more details, go to the Palladian Hotel.

    Nicole Hollis is based in San Francisco and a member of the Remodelista Designer/Architect Directory. To see more work by Nicole Hollis in our posts Old World Meets New World in the Napa Valley and A Serene Sonoma Guest Retreat.

    See more lighting by Ladies & Gentlemen Studio.

    If you're coveting a leather chair, check out these options: 5 Favorites: Modern Leather Sling Chairs.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    We're thrilled to announce our third and final judge for the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards: artist-designer, retailer, and king of decoupage John Derian.  

    John Derian, 2015 Considered Design Awards Judge | Remodelista

    Above: John Derian's home decor empire is large and growing, but he's still best known for the decoupage accessories that made him famous. His plates, bowls, and paperweights are each created by hand in his New York studio using John's collection of antique and vintage prints.

    A lover of all things old, John has developed a line of furniture for LA-based eco-furniture maker Cisco Brothers that's largely inspired by antique European designs. He has three shops in New York, all on the same block in the East Village: one that showcases his decoupage and global finds; another devoted to textiles, furniture, and art; and a third filled with his Cisco Brothers collection. John also has a summertime shop in Provincetown, Massachusetts.

    For more, browse John's collaborations with Remodelista favorite French tableware maker Astier de Villatte. Follow him on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram: @johnderian and @johnderiancompany. Photograph via The Telegraph.

    9 Things to Know About John

    Cities I've Lived In: Boston, Cambridge, New York. 

    Bloomsbury Group Charleston Retreat, The Telegraph | Remodelista

    Biggest Design Influence: Clive and Vanessa Bell's Bloomsbury Group: The idea of a group of friends and families starting a movement is inspiring. (Photograph of the library at the Bloomsbury Group's Charleston retreat via The Telegraph.)

    Favorite Shop: Paula Rubenstein's antiques shop on Bond Street in NYC. Paula is a true artist.

    Favorite Artist: I don't have a favorite, but lately I've been into the work of Philip Malicoat.

    The Pantheon in Rome | Remodelista

    Favorite Work of Architecture: The Pantheon in Rome. (Photograph by Meredith Swinehart.) 

    Last Item I Bought for My House: Two pretty still life paintings and a self portrait by Evelin Bodfish BourneJames Bakker Gallery in Provincetown has an amazing collection of her work.

    Latest DIY Project: Not really a DIY, but I did recently clean my basement in my house in Provincetown and it was so satisfying. 

    On My Wish List for My House: A roof deck.

    Emily Haas String Art | Remodelista

    Last Art Exhibit I Saw: The artist Emily Hass in a group show in Brooklyn. (Photograph from String-Nail series via Emily Hass.)

    Design by John Derian 

    John Derian, 2015 Considered Design Awards Judge | Remodelista

    Above: John Derian makes his home on one floor of an 1850s former factory in the East Village, the perfect space for a man obsessed with patina. John retained the loft's smoke-stained walls and damaged plastering, and his back windows overlook a 19th-century graveyard. Here, a mix of antique pieces and John's own designs in his living room. Apartment photography by William Abranowicz for the New York Times

    John Derian, 2015 Considered Design Awards Judge | Remodelista

    Above: In his bedroom, John used the room's subfloor as the new floor and had the windows restored; otherwise, he left it largely as found. 

    John Derian, 2015 Considered Design Awards Judge | Remodelista

    Above: A door leads from the bedroom to a closet and corner space that John uses as a home office.

    John Derian, 2015 Considered Design Awards Judge | Remodelista

    Above: When John bought the loft, the shower was located in a makeshift closet at the top of several stairs; his improved setup has subway tiled walls and gold-toned fixtures.

    John Derian, 2015 Considered Design Awards Judge | Remodelista

    Above: The home office is evocative of John's decoupage.

    Read profiles of our other two Remodelista awards judges, designer Estee Stanley and blogger Will Taylor of Bright Bazaar. 

    Don't forget to enter your spaces into the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards contest by midnight Pacific Time this Monday, June 22. 

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    New York designer Magdalena Keck says that pied-à-terres are her dream projects: "You get to know people from across the globe and work with them to realize their dreams." In the case of her most recent overhaul, Keck's client was a São Paulo businessman who needed a toehold in New York and fell for a small one-bedroom TriBeCa loft. Though it needed light and storage, among other things, Keck's client didn't want to let go of the charming roughness that had wooed him in the first place.

    His programmatic needs were simple: He travels to NYC every two to three months for business and pleasure, sometimes just for a day en route to Europe, other times joined by his family for a stay of several weeks. In response, Keck saw to it that the living room quickly converts into a sleeping space, and introduced a second bath plus washer and dryer to accommodate family and guests. 

    As for costs, the majority of project dollars went toward swapping existing living room windows for French doors that lead to small steel balconies; relocating the kitchen to join the living room in one open space; and adding the second bath. To keep budget in check, Keck salvaged the existing wood floor, used no-frills lighting wherever possible, and specified simple, reasonably priced fixtures for the bath. Take a look at her results.

    Photography by Jeff Cate

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: The first and most dramatic order of business was to replace the existing living room windows with balcony doors to let in air and light. The client wanted an outdoor space, but his request to build a large terrace was rejected by building management. Instead, Keck installed two small steel balconies that project from the apartment about 18 inches, the maximum the building would allow. It's enough space for the client to have standing room and even a tiny balcony garden.

    (Thinking of French doors for your own place? See Remodeling 101 for advice.)

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: Keck removed the rusted and patched tin ceiling to reveal the original wood ceiling and steel hangers. NYC building code requires fireproofing between apartments, so Keck removed the ceiling's aged paint and applied an invisible, matte fireproofing to the newly exposed ceilings. To lighten the space, Keck had the wood floors restored and whitewashed, and the worn brick walls painted white. 

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: Privacy curtains were needed in the living room, but how to keep them from dominating the doors? Keck chose a pure white linen to contrast with the rawness of the TriBeCa alley beyond. And instead of hanging standard, space-hogging curtains over the doors, she created a simple wooden-peg solution: a linen panel hangs loosely on one peg when open, and drapes across three pegs when closed.

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: A custom kitchen replaced a worn one from the 1970s that had been tucked in an awkward location. The new design faces the living room, so Keck's client can cook for guests while socializing.

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: The stainless steel island is wrapped in black Corian on three sides, allowing the stainless steel drawer facings to mirror the stainless steel appliances on the pantry wall. Keck used affordable black track lighting to spotlight the artwork on the far wall.

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: The back wall of the kitchen is made of full-height oak pantries with a wall oven, warming drawer, and wine cooler from Viking.

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: Keck chose Benjamin Moore Super White for the apartment walls. In the small dining area, vintage wood furniture stands out against the clean white background.  

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: The sole bedroom is small—it accommodates a queen-sized bed with 10 inches of space on either side—but has a long hallway. Deciding to "embrace and exaggerate the unusual proportions," Keck ingeniously put the hall to use as an extra-long, custom closet. Its white linen curtains can be pulled closed and backlit to create some drama. At the end of the hall, the space is closed off by a sliding door.

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: Along the bedroom/closet hallway, minimalist lights by Davide Groppi accentuate the aged beamed ceilings.

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: In the bathrooms, Keck used an affordable marble tile for the showers and floor, the same black Corian counters that are in the kitchen, and minimal fixtures from Cifial. "The simple composition of genuine materials and clean forms works in these small spaces," says Keck.

     

    Remodeled Tribeca Loft by Magdalena Keck | Remodelista

    Above: White Corian shelves are incorporated into the marble shower tiling, so no hardware is visible. And full-height mirrors make the bathrooms feel bigger than they are. 

    Browse more lofts that we love: 

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    Rupert Mckelvie of Out of the Valley is on a mission to elevate backwoods design. Based in bucolic Devon England, he specializes in making masterfully detailed off-the-grid cabins—see his Devon showcase/vacation rental here. "The idea was to bring a bit of the natural world into people's homes," he says of his latest accoutrement, a curiosities cabinet. 

    Object Calendar by UK designer Rupert Mckelvie of Out of the Valley | Remodelista

    Above: Known as the Object Calendar, the cabinet's 12 compartments "each represent a month of the year, and can be used to document seasonal changes with found objects" says Rupert. It's made of English ash with hand-cut dovetails and a cork backing. You supply the curiosities.

    Object Calendar by UK designer Rupert Mckelvie of Out of the Valley | Remodelista

    Above: The cabinet comes with entomology pins for securing finds in place.

    Object Calendar by UK designer Rupert Mckelvie of Out of the Valley | Remodelista

    Above: Brass fittings and a limestone weight hold an ash-framed Plexiglas door in place. The Calendar Cabinet is £495 ($779) from Out of the Valley.

    We're eternally on the hunt for display ideas. Here are some more of our favorites:

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    "You might be surprised by how many shades of pale there are (and by how lovely they look by moonlight," writes Michelle of this week's horticultural journey down the Great White Way.

    White Garden Eringium Sissinghurst |  Gardenista

    Above: 11 Ideas to Steal for a Moonlit Garden. (Eringium in Sissinghurst's white garden, shown here, photographed by Kendra Wilson.)

    White glassy greenhouse in Sweden | Gardenista

    Above: Outbuilding of the Week, a glassy greenhouse in Sweden.

    Painted metal bistro table from Terrain | Gardenista

    Above: 10 Easy Pieces: White Outdoor Dining Tables.

    Architects' exterior white paint picks | Gardenista

    Above: 10 Easy Pieces: Architects' White Exterior Paint Picks.

    White garden summer Tom Broom photo | Gardenista

    Above: Expert Advice: 10 White Garden Ideas from Petersham Nurseries in London. UK readers, note: This Thursday to Sunday, our own Christine Hanway will be hosting a Gardenista Market at GROW London.

    Ben Wolff White Clay pots | Gardenista

    Above: 10 Favorite Planters in White and Palest Gray. (These examples are made of white clay by Connecticut potter Ben Wolff.)

    Have you sent in your submissions to the Gardenista Considered Design Awards? Whether you're a professional or an enthusiast, now is the time: Final deadline is this Monday. Click below for details.

    Enter the Gardenista Consider Design Awards contest

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    If you haven't submitted your entry to the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, it's time to get going! Entries are due this Monday, June 22, by midnight Pacific Time. 

    Insider tip: So far, we've received the fewest entries in the Best Bath Space category for both professional and amateur designers.

    Here's a sneak preview of some of the entries we've received so far, followed by the full list of Remodelista categories. (Curious about the competition? You can see all contest entries as soon as they're submitted on the Remodelista Awards Page.)

    Entries to the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Remodelista Awards Categories

    We're running separate contests for professional designers and amateur designers in the following categories: 

    • Best Kitchen Space 
    • Best Living and/or Dining Space 
    • Best Bath Space 

    Prize

    Every winner will receive a $200 gift card from prize sponsor Kaufmann Mercantile, and every project will be profiled with a full post on Remodelista. Winners will be announced on August 8.

    Gardeners and Outdoor Designers

    The Gardenista Considered Design Awards has six categories this year for home gardeners and for architects and spatial designers. Head over to Gardenista for details.

    How to Enter

    Our contest is open to everyone living in the US, UK, and Canada (except Quebec), and there is no entry fee. Submit up to six photos of your space along with a descriptive caption for each photo and a design statement explaining your overall project. You can submit one project in each category for which you qualify. All projects will be published live on our Awards Hub Page within minutes of submitting.

    See our Official Rules and FAQ for more information, and Enter the Contest here. 

    Entries due June 22, 2015 to the Remodelista Considered Design Awards

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    Read on to find out what we loved this week—and get ready for the longest day of the year on Sunday.

    Remodlista Considered Design Awards Submission for Best Amateur Living Dining Space

    • Above: We're exploring vacation houses all week. A submission to the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards from Maui caught our eye. Join the contest: The last day to enter is this Monday by midnight PST. 
    • More than just a door
    • Celebrities (and one U.S. President) who dreamed of becoming architects

    Michael Anastassiades Mediation Stools, Marble | Remodelista

    Morgan Puett Home | Remodelista

    • Above: Mildred Lane, installation artist J. Morgan Puett's "experiment in ethical living" (with rooms to rent). Discovered in DV8, a just launched cultural magazine devoted to Upstate New York. Photograph by Michael Mundy.
    • A bathroom made by British designer Max Lamb with colorful synthetic marble as the "protagonist." 
    • Airbnb lodging and host tax demystified. 

    Nissa Kinjalina Living Light | Remodelista

    Instagram and Pinterest Picks of the Week

    Remodelista Instagram Pick of the Week: @themerchanthome

    • Above: For a merchandiser's look at design-worthy shopping, follow the Merchant Home (@themerchanthome). 

    Remodelista Pinterest Pick of the Week: Leigh Patterson, Place Board

    • Above: Remodelista contributor Leigh Patterson has an eye for understated interiors: See her Places board. 

    Want more Remodelista? Check out our City Summer issue and head to Gardenista for White Gardens

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    The salt air. The smell of beach plums in the sun. The thwack of screen doors. Join us for a week of getting away to summery places near and far.

    The 1970 Kugel/Gips House, Wellfleet, MA, designed by Charlie Zehnder, restored and available as a rental from the Cape Cod Modern House Trust | Remodelista

    Above: The Kugel Gips House in Wellfleet, Massachusetts, designed in 1970 by Charlie Zehnder, restored by the Cape Cod Modern House Trust—and available as a summer rental. Get the details in The Pond-Front Vacation House.

    Monday

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: Julie visits the Old Homestead, a newly revived guesthouse in Provincetown, Massachusetts, in today's Hotels & Lodging post.

    Tuesday

    Ikea Pitcher with Cork Lid | Remodelista

    Above: Just what you need? On Tuesday, we present our favorite Summer Tabletop finds—all under $25.

    Wednesday

    POD Idladla prefab tiny house from South Africa | Remodelista

    Above: The latest in our Prefab House series: This artfully designed pod for two arrives on site in a flatpack.

    Thursday

    Henrybuilt Kitchen, Remodelista

    Above: Dark, handsome, and low maintenance. In Remodeling 101 we explore soapstone, one of our all-time favorite countertop materials. And watch for soapstone counters (plus an Etsy-sourced work island) in our Kitchen of the Week. Photograph from Henrybuilt.

    Friday

    Tiina Laakonen guest room in Amagansett NY, with Marimekko quits, photograph by Matthew Williams | Remodelista

    Above: On Friday, Margot rounds up what's often the nicest room in the house: the guest Bedroom.  Also on Friday, Meredith presents well-priced, high-end Bedding from a group of online upstarts (and to complete the picture, check out her post on the New Mattress Disruptor Companies). Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista.

    Go to Gardenista to explore outdoor dining essentials and summer house gardens this week.

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    Rescued from the tide, a former general store in coastal Maine is reborn as a modern summer cottage.

    When Fiona Hooper first set foot in the dilapidated general store turned cottage, she fell in love with the view. Where Harbor Cottage is set—right against the bay in Martinsville, Maine—the high tide literally laps at the porch, which also caused the basement to flood. Fiona staved off the water with some initial improvements. But when it came time for a total interior overhaul, she and her husband, Tony, called on architect Sheila Narusawa to set things right. With the addition of painted shiplap and many more windows, Narusawa brought Harbor Cottage into the 21th century, while paying homage to its history and heritage. And the good news: It's available for rent (see details below).

    Photography by Justine Hand.

    Above: A print by British artist Wilhelmina Barns-Graham hangs over a sideboard displaying stones from the three continents where Fiona has lived: Maine, Plettenberg Bay in South Africa, and Dungeness in the UK.

    living room at harbor cottage

    Above: Previously chopped up into several rooms, the living room is now one big space. Narusawa added double-hung windows to take in the view of the bay as it wraps around the point. White paint on the walls and ceilings throughout the home create a sense of seamless interiors. Fiona recovered the sofa in antique French linen from The Marston House in Wiscasset, Maine. The antique mirror over the stove was a gift from her mother many years ago when she first left home.

    Above: A checked blanket on a built-in daybed. The pitcher holds red and blue privet berries.

     

    Above: Water views through windows that date to the days when the building was a general store.

    Harbor Cottage in Maine designed by Sheila Narusawa, photograph by Justine Hand | Remodelista

    Above: Fiona bought the antique dining table on vacation in the south of France.

    Above: In the kitchen, old-fashioned shiplap is applied to the drawers and cabinets; even the fridge is paneled. Read about the paneling in Expert Advice: The Enduring Appeal of Shiplap.

    Above: Narusawa used open shelving in the kitchen and soapstone counters from Vermont. (Watch for our Remodeling 101 post on soapstone counters this Thursday.) 

    All construction at Harbor Cottage was carried out by Harbor Builders. 

    Harbor Cottage in Maine kitchen with soapstone counters | Remodelista

    Above: Soapstone provides a nice backdrop for an old bowl that Fiona's mother brought from Scotland.

     Harbor Cottage in Maine designed by Sheila Narusawa, photograph by Justine Hand | Remodelista

    Above: Tucked under the eaves, the expanded upstairs bathroom has a New England rustic vibe.

    Above: The room features a refurbished antique tub and the same bracketed open shelving as the kitchen. (For a similar bath designed by Narusawa with sourcing info, go to Steal This Look.)

    Above: A farmhouse sink sits atop a rustic wood countertop.

    Above: Narusawa created the lofty master suite out of three small bedrooms. She anchored the bed to an island in the center of the room, allowing the area behind to serve as a dressing area/office.

    Above: The view from the bed creates the illusion that one is floating on the sea.

     Harbor Cottage in Maine remodeled by Sheila Narusawa, photograph by Justine Hand | Remodelista

    Above: Harbor Cottage also has a two-bedroom guest cottage next to it (shown left); the two houses sleep six and are available for rent together. The town of Martinsville is in midcoastal Maine; for information, go to Harbor Cottage Maine. To see more photographs, go to Design Skool.

    Heading to Maine? We recommend visits to Snug Harbor Farm nursery in Kennebunk, and the Corey Daniels Gallery in nearby Wells.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

    This post is an update; it originally ran on May 16, 2012, as part of our Northern Light issue.

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    My knowledge of guest room niceties is a family legacy. For several years, my mom owned a bed-and-breakfast in the Napa Valley. When she opened the inn, she told me that it had been her lifelong dream to run her own business. But it was clear that the dream was really all about stocking the best amenities: Organic hand soaps and porcelain bedside carafes led to sprigs of lavender on turned-down bedsheets.

    When it comes to setting one B&B or rental house or guest quarters apart from the rest, it's all in the details. We've created a list of six amenities—each with a high and low option—guaranteed to give an instant upgrade.

    Liquid Hand Soap

    Aesop Resurrection Liquid Hand Wash | Remodelista

    Above: Aesop's Resurrection Aromatique Hand Wash is scented with cedarwood and orange; $39 for a 16-ounce bottle. Photograph from Makers & Brothers of Dublin, who also sell the soap.

    Murchison Hume Superlative Liquid Hand Soap | Remodelista

    Above: Packaged in a similar amber-colored bottle, Murchison-Hume's Superlative Liquid Hand Soap is $20 for 17 ounces, and a 32-ounce Refill Liquid Soap Bottle is $22 on Amazon.

    Bath Towels

    Restoration Hardware White Turkish Bath Towels | Remodelista

    Above: Restoration Hardware's white Turkish Bath Towel is currently on sale for $24 (marked down from $29).

    Haren White Bath Towel from Ikea | Remodelista

    Above: Ikea's basic white Hären Bath Towels are $2.99, and Hären Hand Towels are $1.99.

    Bed Linens

    The White Company Savoy Bed Linen Collection | Remodelista

    Above: The UK's White Company offers Italian 400-count, cotton percale sheets. The Savoy Bed Linen Collection includes pillowcases from $30 and fitted and flat sheets starting at $120 each. For more options, see 10 Easy Pieces: Hotel Sheets and Editors' Picks: Favorite Luxury Bed Linens.

    Parachute Duvet Cover and Sheet Set | Remodelista

    Above: Parachute, a Los Angeles company specializing in affordable Italian luxury linens, sells the Venice Sheet Set (a fitted sheet, duvet cover, and two pillowcases) from $199. Read more about Parachute in Eat, Pray, Love: Luxury Linens for Less, and find more Bed Linens in our Shop section. 

    Water Carafe

    Bedside Carafe with Glass from Crate & Barrel | Remodelista

    Above: Crate & Barrel's Bedside Carafe with Glass is $24.95.

    Bedside Carafe with Tumbler from Canvas | Remodelista

    Above: The Bedside Carafe with Tumbler is $14.40, marked down from $18, at Canvas. For more of our favorites, see 10 Easy Pieces: Bedside Water Carafes.

    Linen Fragrance

    Susanne Kaufmann Calming Pillow Spray | Remodelista

    Above: Blended in the Austrian alps with lavender and orange oil, Susanne Kaufmann's Calming Pillow Spray can be used as a bed linen or room spray; $28 for 2.5 ounces at The Line. For more finds from The Line, see A Soho Dream Loft (Where Everything Is for Sale).

    The Laundress Linen Spray | Remodelista

    Above: The Laundress Linen Spray is a subtle lavender solution for use when ironing or steaming and as a room refresher; 16 ounces for $14.95 at Crate & Barrel.

    Sewing Kit

    Merchant & Mills Sewing Kit | Remodelista

    Above: For guests' clothing emergencies, the comprehensive Sewing Notions Set is £42 ($66.80) from Merchant & Mills. Photograph via Aesthetic Nest.

    Muji Portable Sewing Kit | Remodelista

    Above: Muji's Portable Sewing Kit contains small quantities of the essentials; $4.95.

    Now that you have the guest room covered, don't miss 7 Essentials for the Bath, Landlady Edition and the Best Summer Beach Towels. Looking for a house to rent? See Editors' Picks: 15 Favorite Vacation Rental Resources

    For design new, tips, and tricks, sign up to receive the daily Remodelista newsletter

    This post is an update; it originally ran on July 10, 2014, as part of our Summer Rentals issue.

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    Designers Kristin Hein and Philip Cozzi of Hein+Cozzi "dumped our sandbox upside down," as they say, and "moved life and studio from the Hamptons to Provincetown, Massachusetts" not too long ago. Growing up, Philip worked summers at Ciro and Sals, a legendary P-Town restaurant co-owned by Ciro Cozzi, an artist and restaurateur. "Everyone, I mean everyone, came—from John Wayne to John Waters, from Robert Motherwell to Norman Mailer," he says. "Provincetown is America's oldest active art colony and we love the sense of community. People pop by and wave, there are impromptu cocktail parties, we ride our bikes out to dinner, to the bank, to the grocery store." 

    When the Old Homestead, a guest house and local landmark in the East End of town, hit the market, the couple took the plunge. Built in 1850 for Captain Frank Rich, a sea captain and sexton of the Church of Saint Mary of the Harbor, "the property was dilapidated and yet wonderfully untouched," Kristin says. "Through every window there was an idyllic view. We kept the history of the place intact, preserving the original beams, the pine floors, and the brick chimney." The Old Homestead is now a luxe two-bedroom, two-bath rental available by the week, stocked fridge, bikes, and paddleboards included. 

    Photography by Paul Freehauf.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: The veranda overlooks Provincetown Harbor and Cape Cod Bay in the distance. The Paul 13 Lantern is from Remains Lighting, the early American farm table is from Nellie's of Amagansett, and the caned Thonet chairs are from 1stdibs.

    Old Homestead Inn in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: In the living area, vintage club chairs mingle with an African bench from Juan Montoya in NYC, carved Chinese stools, and a Fortuny fixture from Ralph Pucci (Philip is the former design director of the studio), and the vintage Khotan and Tibetan rugs are from Galerie Shabab in NYC.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: The shiplap walls are painted a gray-violet shade from the Guggenheim Collection by Fine Paints of Europe (G020 to be precise). "It feels like the moment before nautical twilight as you gaze out onto the bay," Kristin says.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: Kristin and Philip retained the original brick chimney, pine floors, and wood beams. "We did add the shiplap to unify the space," they say.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: The oak Cutter Wardrobe by Skagerak is $699 from Horne. Have a look at 11 Display-Worthy Clothes Hangers.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: The kitchen includes a Bertazzoni range, a narrow Active Smart Fisher Paykel Refrigerator with Bottom Freezer (see our post on the company's dishwasher drawers here), and Tolix Marais stools. (Designing your own compact kitchen? See Skinny Refrigerators and Best Appliances for Small Kitchens for ideas.)

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: Glassware from Reidel is stored overhead.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: Throughout the house Apartment Pendants with Clear Glass Shades from Schoolhouse Electric are casually wrapped around the existing beams.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: The carved Chinese fertility bed is from Julie Hodgess in London (Kristin worked for her design company for a few years before forming Hein+Cozzi with Philip).

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: The bathrooms have Duravit Vero Washbasins and Waterworks Highgate taps and fixtures. The hex tiles are from Oak Park Tile.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: Guest rooms are outfitted with organic Saatva mattresses and Society bed linens sourced from ABC Carpet & Home.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown | Remodelista

    Above: Sliding doors open onto the main living space.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: A shiplap-paneled bath with a Mini Cutter Wardrobe by Skagerak for towels and Fresnel adjustable wall/ceiling lights designed by Joe Colombo for Oluce.

    Old Homestead in Provincetown, MA | Remodelista

    Above: "We are 60 miles out into the ocean, the tides rise and fall 11 feet twice a day, the light rivals Greece, the sense of adventure and freedom is palpable," Kristin says. The house rents by the week; for booking information, go to the Old Homestead Provincetown

    We also recommend the Salt House Inn in Provincetown. And for another old Cape Cod house that we love, see Justine's Soulful Family Cottage (and learn how to make her Cape Cod Beach Plum Jam).

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    Why does the word "kitchenette" sound so retro? When we featured a tiny 186-square-foot summer cottage as our Outbuilding of the Week on Gardenista, we admired the way it relies heavily on Ikea to make modern use of every inch of space (giving houseguests an excuse to stay out of sight till after breakfast). Here's how to re-create the look.

    Above: Furnishings first. The secret to making a 186-square-foot cottage look spacious is diminutive furniture. A 30-inch wooden Tripod Table ($199 from West Elm) seats two comfortably. Ikea's birch plywood Frosta Stool (£8 in Great Britain, not available in the US) is a copy of the Alvar Aalto original and extremely versatile; it doubles as side table or nightstand as needed. Photograph by Nicole Franzen for Gardenista.

    Above: The back wall is covered in four-by-eight-foot Wainscot Panels ($19.97 each) from Home Depot. Photograph by Nicole Franzen for Gardenista.  

    Above: On the shelves, Open Kitchen Salad Plates ($20 for a set of four) and Open Kitchen Mugs ($20 for a set of four) are available from Williams-Sonoma.

     

    Above: Before we get started on the fixtures, let's fix ourselves a nice pot of tea. From Staub, an Enameled Cast Iron Round Tea Kettle in basil green is $159.99 from Big Kitchen. 

     

    Above: Bellocq's 3.5-ounce reusable travel caddy filled with Majorelle Mint Tea is $38 from Sundance.

     

    Above: Guests can boil water in the microwave and then pour it into the kettle to brew. A GE 1,200-Watt Black Countertop Microwave sits on its own recessed shelf; $179 from Lowe's. 

     

    Above: Braced to deal with the plumbing? An Edsvik chrome faucet is $49.99 and a Fyndig Single Bowl Sink is $26.98, both from Ikea. They're mounted on a 1 1/2-inch-thick beechwood Karlby Countertop ($99 for a 74-inch length from Ikea).

     

    Above: Made of recycled glass, the Copper Soap Dispenser holds 13.5 ounces; $30 from Terrain.

     

    Above: A nickel-plated Fintorp dish drainer ($14.99 from Ikea) attaches to the wall with two screws and holds a removable tray.

    Above: Ikea's freestanding two-door Sektion Base Cabinet Faced with Grevsta Stainless Steel is 30 inches wide; $195.

    Are you looking for inexpensive and stylish ideas to kit out a summer guest cottage? See Steal This Look: A Finnish Cottage Kitchen and Dining Room and Steal This Look: Beach Cottage on the Dutch Coast.

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    With a minor tweak, a lamp from the hardware store is personalized—by way of color choice—and elevated. Easy, quick, and useful in every rooms, it's the DIY every summer house needs.

    Photography by Alexa Hotz for Remodelista.

    Materials

    DIY Painted Hardware Store Clip Lamp | Remodelista

    Instructions

    DIY Painted Hardware Store Clip Lamp | Remodelista

    Step 1: Remove all labels and clip off unwanted tags to prepare the light for painting.

    DIY Painted Hardware Store Clip Lamp | Remodelista

    Step 2: Remove the lampshade, paying close attention so that you can reassemble it later.

    DIY Painted Hardware Store Clip Lamp | Remodelista

    Step 3: In a well-ventilated area, spray the exterior of the lampshade with a coat of paint. Allow it to dry before adding a second coat.

    DIY Painted Hardware Store Clip Lamp | Remodelista

    Step 4: When the exterior is completely dry, flip the shade over and apply two coats to the inside.

    DIY Painted Hardware Store Clip Lamp | Remodelista

    Step 5: Reassemble the clamp light with the painted lampshade.

    The Finished Look

    DIY Painted Hardware Store Clip Lamp | Remodelista

    Above: Here's a detail of the light on my kitchen shelf.

    DIY Painted Hardware Store Clip Lamp | Remodelista

    Above: For a look at Justine's off-white version, see The Soulful Side of Old Cape Cod: Justine's Family Cottage.

    Looking to make some quick lighting tweaks at home? Visit Design Sleuth: The Tolomeo Light Takes a Turn, DIY: Razor Clam Pendant Light, and A New $60 Lindsey Adelman Pendant Light.

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    This post is an update; it originally ran on September 29, 2014, as part of our Belgian Masters issue.

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