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    If you can't have your own Modernist house on the East End of Long Island or on the Outer Cape, you can re-create similar interiors with storage furniture that is as appealing as is it efficient at hiding things away. To solve your bedroom storage woes, here are our 10 recent favorite modern wood dressers.

    Matthew Hilton McQueen Dresser for De La Espada | Remodelista

    Above: The McQueen Large Chest with dovetail joinery shown here in Danish-oiled walnut is by Matthew Hilton for De la Espada; $7,495 at the Future Perfect.

    Joyce Dresser from Pinch Design | Remodelista

    Above: The Joyce Chest of Drawers is £3,990 ($6,248) from Pinch Design in England.

    American Modern Dresser from DWR | Remodelista

    Above: The pale maple American Modern 5-Drawer Dresser is made by the Design Within Reach team for $2,985.

    Sawkille Cerrillos Dresser in Bleached Maple | Remodelista

    Above: The Cerrillos Dresser by Sawkille is built from bleached ash and hand-painted steel. Contact Sawkille for more information.

    Tate Chest of Drawers from Crate & Barrel | Remodelista

    Above: Crate & Barrel's Tate 5-Drawer Chest in walnut is $999.

    Ethnicraft Oak Azur Chest of Drawers | Remodelista

    Above: Ethnicraft's Oak Azur Chest of Drawers is $2,300 at Lekker Home. For more on the company, see our post Simple Wood Furniture from Ethnicraft in Belgium.

    Above: The Oppland 6-Drawer Dresser is a budget option at $249 from Ikea.

    Elaine Four Drawer by Phloem Studio in Portland, Oregon | Remodelista

    Above: The Elaine Four Drawer is from Phloem Studio's Ben Klebba in Portland, Oregon. Contact Phloem Studio for pricing and availability.

    Delano Dresser from Room & Board | Remodelista

    Above: The Delano Dresser (shown in maple) from Room & Board is $1,699.

    Nash Teak Dresser from West Elm | Remodelista

    Above: The Nash Teak 5-Drawer Dresser is elevated off the floor with a metal base; $1,199 at West Elm.

    Finish your collection of wood bedroom furniture with our posts:

    And see our original edit of wood dressers in 10 Easy Pieces: Simple Wood Dressers for more options.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Julie and I recently discovered that for the past two years, we've been collecting the same handblown bottles and bud vases that look unearthed from another era. And cost surprisingly little. I found mine at John Derian in NYC; she found hers at John Derian in Provincetown, Massachusetts. When I spotted Julie's lineup on her living room shelf, she decided to do some sleuthing.

    Mexico? Morocco? It turns out the designs are the work of Paris glass studio La Soufflerie (translation: The Blower), which takes inspiration from ancient wares and uses recycled glass.

    La Soufflerie Vases | Remodelista

    Above: Julie's collection of La Soufflerie vases.

    Hand-blown glass canister by La Soufflerie in Paris via KColette | Remodellista

    Husband-and-wife team Sébastian and Valentina Nobile—he's a glassblower, she's an artist—founded La Soufflerie in 2007. "We are a group of artisans now," says Valentina. "We use ancien forms and techniques—we blow mainly sitting down using a clay oven—to make utilitarian everyday objects."

    Shown here, a 7.5-inch-tall Blown-Glass Mendian, $55, from K Colette in Portland, Maine. La Soufflerie's designs are sold worldwide. In the US, they're also at John Derian stores (visit or write to inquire), HPF in New York City, and Patch NYC in Boston. 

    Handblown glass candelstick by La Soufflerie, Paris | Remodelista

    Above: La Soufflerie makes a series of blown-glass candlestick holders that also work as vases; go to the La Soufflerie vendor map to find retailers. In London, the glassware is carried by Ben Pentreath and the Conran shop, among others; Paris shops include Merci, Thalia, Stanislas Draber, and Winter Dreams.

    Handblown vase by La Soufflerie via KColette | Remodelista

    Above: Blown Glass Florida Bottle, $35, from K Colette. "We're able to keep prices low because we only create our collections when we have enough orders," says Valentina.

    La Soufflerie Piccola Vase | Remodelista

    Above: Blown Glass Piccola Bottle, $20, from K Colette.

    glass candle lantern by La Soufflerie, Paris | Remodelista

    Above: From the archives, a blown-glass and tinware candle lantern from La Soufflerie's Déesse (Goddess) collection.

    To see the company's new milk bottle design, go to 10 Favorites from the French Scullery

    For US glass companies we have our eye on, take a look at Malfatti Glass and Deborah Ehrlich, both in upstate New York and Nate Cotterman in LA.

    Go to 10 Easy Pieces for Our Favorite Everyday Drinking Glasses.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Admired on UK real estate site The Modern House: a 17th-century barn in the North Norfolk village of Thursford, converted by Lynch Architects of London into an idyllic, clean-lined-meets-crumbly country escape. Asking price: £254,959 ($399,228), furnishings also available "as a single lot by separate negotiation"—and, in the meantime, it's available for rent.

    Photography via The Modern House, unless noted.

    Modern farmhouse kitchen in the Thursford Barn in Norfolk, England by Lynch Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The barn has been put to many uses over the years, including as a bike repair shop. Lynch Architects removed the ground-floor interior walls to create an open kitchen/living space, but restored and preserved the exterior walls of brick and flint. The new oak floor is finished with a Danish oil; it was laid over a new slab concrete base and outfitted with radiant floor heating. The kitchen, complete with Aga, has butcher block counters stained to match the floorboards. 

     Built-in cupobards and doors at the Thursford Barn in Norfolk, England by Lynch Architects | Remodelista

    Above: To keep the barn-like quality of the interior, the architects introduced an ingenious wall of tongue-and-groove paneling detailed with hidden doors and cupboards. "We built a new independent timber structure inside the old walls of the barn, insulating the ceiling and the floor, which enabled us to expose the old rubble walls internally," architect Patrick Lynch told Dezeen. "Everything, old and new, is painted white in order to emphasize the singular volume and to unify the space, which means that the rhythm of joints and tiny shadows is the predominant feature."

    Built-in cupboards and doors at Thursford Barn in Norfolk, England by Lynch Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The doors lead to a bedroom, bathroom, and stairs.

    Window wall in the Thursford Barn in Norfolk, England by Lynch Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The designers opened the room to the outdoors by inserting a floor-to-ceiling slatted window (with concealed shutters that close for privacy).

    Built-in plywood stairs and rope rail in the Thursford Barn in Norfolk, England by Lynch Architects | Remodelista

    Above: Two exterior steps—of hinged tongue-and-groove-boarding that double as storage—connect to a concealed stairway of birch plywood. 

    Wood-paneled stair with rope rail and paneled bedroom in a converted barn by Lynch Architects in Norfolk, England | Remodelista

    Above L: The design, known as a Norfolk winder stair, is detailed with a rope banister. Above R: Paneled in birch ply, the upstairs bedroom is exactly the size of a king-size bed and intended to be "a hidden niche-like timber retreat." Photographs via Humble Homes.

    Wood-paneled modern farmhouse bedroom in the Thursford Barn by Lynch Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The window has a deep plywood frame that serves as a bedside ledge. The small hatch overlooks downstairs.

    Modern farmhouse bedroom in the Thursford Barn by Lynch Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The first floor bedroom has inset birch ply shelving and exposed rafters. The wall light is Original BTC's Hector design. 

    Converted brick barn, the Thursford barn in Norfolk, England | Remodelista

    Above: The barn adjoins a historic cottage that Lynch Architects also overhauled. 

    Thursford Barn in Norfolk, England by Lynch Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The vertical windows integrate well with the weathered brick and flint. The existing roof had to be removed but was replaced with reclaimed terracotta tiles in the style of the original.

    Modern farmhouse conversion, the Thursford Barn by Lynch Architects in Norfolk, England | Remodelista

    Above: The structure sits on the village green. Go to The Modern House for more details, including the possibility of renting the barn before it sells.

    Here are some more barns that stopped us in our tracks.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    The winner of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards Best Amateur-Designed Living/Dining Space is Brigitte Gfeller of Hudson, New York.

    Her project was chosen as a finalist by Remodelista editor in chief Julie Carlson, who said, "Rustic and tranquil without veering into quaint territory. The placid palette and repeating wooden elements play a lovely duet."

    N.B.: This is the third of six posts spotlighting the winners of the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards. Go to this year's Considered Design Awards page to see all the entries, finalists, and winners, and have a look at Gardenista's Considered Design Awards, too.

    Winner Brigitte Gfeller, Best Amateur Living/Dining Room | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Brigitte Gfeller's Design Statement: "This 1800s Italianate Victorian was carefully renovated with harmony, tranquillity, and balance in mind. Old details include beautiful woodwork and a functional pocket door. New additions include waxed oak floors, new ceilings, and a Morso woodstove on an inlaid tempered glass plate. New wooden windows keep the old charm and add insulation."

    Winner Brigitte Gfeller, Best Amateur Living/Dining Room | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: Where do you live?
    A: My home is the Rivertown Guest House. I live in the first floor apartment and rent out the second floor apartment as a vacation/Airbnb rental. When traveling, I rent my personal apartment out as well. My gorgeous old Italianate Victorian house is located in the beautiful Hudson River Valley. I have traveled and lived in many different parts of the world and Hudson is by far my favorite place! We are surrounded by the soft rolling hills of lush Columbia County, with its multitude of farms—many of them organic. You can feel the connectedness to the earth, the grassroots movements of “back to” natural, simple, and healthy, and the appreciation of good craftsmanship and art.

    Hudson has a wealth to offer, from historic homes, antiques, art dealers, and galleries, to a fabulous food scene with gourmet restaurants, food stores, and a hopping farmers' market. Across the river are the Catskills, offering many outdoor activities like fishing, biking, hiking, and skiing. The Berkshires, Great Barrington, and Rhinebeck are only a short drive away. And my home is a five-minute walk from the train station, which is only a two-hour ride from NYC. 

    I bought this beautiful two-story, two-family, mid-1800s home in March of 2014. It took me several weeks and the encouragement of my kids to decide to buy it—the house was in desperate need of restoring. Even though I’m very hands-on myself, I didn't have any experience in renovating such an old home and had to hire a contracting/managing firm. To micro-manage the project, I moved into the apartment that wasn't being worked on, then switched to the other apartment halfway through.

    Winner Brigitte Gfeller, Best Amateur Living/Dining Room | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What were your practical goals for the project?

    A: My goal was to create a peaceful, healthy environment—a soothing, uncluttered place with soft colors and natural, good quality materials. But first, the house needed a lot more than just interior design; it needed almost everything! There was no central heating, the roof leaked, the plumbing was outdated, the electrical was insufficient and partly dangerous, and the basement was like a scene from a scary movie. The windows were mostly rotten and the outside of the house needed lots of skilled repair.

    Today the house has two efficient HVAC systems, a new roof, basement floor, plumbing, bathrooms, kitchen, electrical, wood windows, a new waxed hardwood floor, a water filter system, and much more, including the garden. Yes, it was a bit scary when I moved in after the closing, but oddly enough I immediately felt like the house was welcoming and embracing me.

    Winner Brigitte Gfeller, Best Amateur Living/Dining Room | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What solutions did you find to your design problems?
    A: One of the challenges was to keep as much of the old as possible while updating for functionality. For example, we took all the old trim down very carefully in order to reuse it—some had to be reproduced though because the windows ended up being a tiny bit bigger than before. I myself stripped and refinished all the window and door corners (rosettes), as well as an old kitchen cabinet that was built into the downstairs kitchen and found its new home in the upstairs kitchen. The new first floor kitchen also kept its old wainscoting. Another challenge was that it ended up costing much more money than anticipated—some things could not be foreseen, since it's an old house, and others were added, such as a new hardwood floor for my personal apartment.

    Winner Brigitte Gfeller, Best Amateur Living/Dining Room | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What are your favorite features of the project?
    A: One of my favorite features is my Morso woodstove, sitting on a glass plate inlaid into the floor. I didn't want to use a traditional glass or stone plate laid on top of the floor; it would have made the room look smaller and would have created a tripping hazard. It was something the carpenters had never done before; I had shown them a picture and everyone was really pleased with the outcome—after we first had the wrong glass.

    Winner Brigitte Gfeller, Best Amateur Living/Dining Room | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What were the hardest lessons you learned along the way?
    A: It was challenging to work with a contracting/managing firm. Next time I would work with a small builder/contractor, who works with his own crew on the job every day.

    Q: What was your biggest splurge?
    A: The biggest splurge was my Morso stove on the inlaid glass plate. It wasn't a necessity, but it indulged my dream of a cozy winter evening fire.

    Q: What projects would you tackle if you had an unlimited budget?
    A: My next project would be to add an art studio/guest apartment in the back of my house.

    Q: What is your favorite local shop?
    A: My favorite local shop is my friend’s 2 Note Perfumery, an all-natural skin care and perfume store on Warren Street in Hudson. 

    Q: Which architects or designers do you admire?
    A: The design firm I admire the most is, of course, Workstead. Not only are they my design source but, in fact, Stefanie [Brechbuehler] is my daughter and Robert [Highsmith] is my son-in-law.

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    What do you do when you're not at work? Brooklyn ceramic artist Suzie Ryu and painter/furniture designer Kana Philip both have demanding jobs by day—she does marketing for architecture site Architizer and he's the cofounder of just-launched content-sharing platform 8. At night, they create things for their online design shop, Trollhagen & Co. As for weekends, they can be found in Chatham, New York, making a dent on their DIY house remodel. Take a look at what they were able to accomplish in two weekends for just under $350. 

    Photography by Suzie Ryu.

    Suzie Ryu of Trollhagen DIY kitchen remodel at the School House in Upstate, NY | Remodelista

    Above: Suzie and Kana arrive every Friday night to their 1930s house, known as The Schoolhouse because it has an 1812 school attached to it. ("The school was rolled down the road after the house was built," says Suzie.) They only have 48 hours there every week, but they manage to get a lot done. After setting up their bedroom, they opened up the 1980s kitchen in the main house by removing the dark upper cabinets and replacing them with open shelving and Ikea pot racks. They painted the lower cabinets white and left the speckled laminate counter and fixtures as is.

    Here's Suzie's description of the open-shelf prep: "First we measured the length and depth we wanted. We decided to run two six-inch-deep boards across our brackets to have an approximate shelf depth of twelve inches. We knew we wanted to run one shelf along the whole length of the wall and have a shorter one running over the sink but not over the stove, so we took our measurements accordingly."

    Suzie Ryu of Trollhagen DIY kitchen remodel at the School House in Upstate, NY | Remodelista

    Above: The shelves are Home Depot pine boards that the couple painted with a roller for speed and then brush-finished because they prefer a handmade look. They used Home Depot's Behr Ultra Pure White paint in matte on the walls and shelves. (Suzie notes that in hindsight it would have been smart to paint the under shelves matte and the top gloss for easy cleaning.) The brackets are Ikea's Ekby Valter design in birch—a mere $4 each—and the hanging bars are Ikea's Bygel Rail (over the sink) and Grundtal Rail (over the stove) with companion Bygel and Gundtal S hooks.

    Like the look? See our post Ultimate Budget Storage: 10 Kitchens with Ikea's Grundtal Rail System.

    Suzie Ryu of Trollhagen DIY kitchen remodel at the School House in Upstate, NY | Remodelista

    Above: The shelves are stocked with Suzie's own ceramics that she sells at Trollhagen & Co., including, on the top shelf, the Harvest Bowl, two-toned Saturday Carafe, and, on the lower shelf, Harvest Dishes and Porcelain Berry Bowl—all, alas, currently sold out. Stay tuned: The couple are at work on furniture and textiles for the shop and also plan to showcase some of their friends' designs.

    Enamelware in Trollhagen Co's DIY kitchen remodel in the School House in Chatham, NY | Remodelista

    Above: Vintage blue enamelware collected locally and white enamelware from Valley Variety in Hudson, New York.

    Suzie Ryu of Trollhagen DIY kitchen remodel at the School House in Upstate, NY | Remodelista

    Above: Suzie replaced the existing leaky faucet with a Glacier Bay Single Handle Pull-Down Sprayer Faucet that she picked out at Home Depot—"it was $170, our biggest expense." She did the installation herself by watching YouTube videos on how to remove an old faucet and put in a new one (here's one she recommends).

    In Progress

    Trollhagen Co's DIY kitchen remodel in progress at the School House in Chatham, NY | Remodelista

    Above: The cabinets awaiting paint. They would receive two coats of brushed-on Behr Ultra Pure White in matte from Home Depot. Suzy and Kana like the look of the hardware-free paneled drawers and doors now that they're white and say they're holding up well.

    Before

    BEFORE Suzie Ryu of Trollhagen kitchen, pre-remodel, at the School House in Upstate, NY | Remodelista

    Above: The compact kitchen overlooks the sun porch, which Suzy and Kana turned into their bedroom. 

    BEFORE Suzie Ryu of Trollhagen kitchen, pre-remodel, at the School House in Upstate, NY | Remodelista

    Above: The cupboard and vent removal took place over a winter weekend (during which three pipes burst), and the wall spackling, sanding, and painting the following weekend.   

    Remodelista subscribe | Remodelista

    See more DIY kitchen overhauls. 

    And on Gardenista, read Michelle's kitchen wisdom in 10 Mistakes to Avoid When You Remodel.

    This post is an update; it originally ran on March 19, 2015, as part of our Weekend Projects issue.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    We've been following Granada Tiles since 2012, when we first took note of their Feliz Tile at Intelligentsia Coffee in LA. Now we're obsessing over their latest collection, a collaboration with Texas-born ceramicist Erin Adams. 

    Granada founders Marcos and Melanie Stephens met Adams at a trade show where Adams was exhibiting her own line of ceramics. The team at Granada found Adams' work to be "interesting, her motifs were clever, and something about them stayed with us long after the show had shut down," they say. Soon after, ideas for a partnership began percolating over email. 

    As a part of Granada's flagship Echo collection, Adams has created 20 new designs that are now available through Granada's Web shop. Each design comes in four distinct colorways, although the company offers color customization on any tiles. 

    Cement Tiles Designed by Erin Adams for Granada | Remodelista

    Above: "I am very into mathematical formulas and geometry and this collection reflects my obsession with the circle, the oval, and the square and how they work together," Adams says. 

    Cement Tiles Designed by Erin Adams for Granada, Northern Lights | Remodelista

    Above: The Malmo design in aqua, white, and midnight. 

    Cement Tiles Designed by Erin Adams for Granada, Viborg Black and White | Remodelista

    Above: Resembling a die or domino, this design is called Viborg, shown here in white on black. 

    Cement Tiles Designed by Erin Adams for Granada, Viborg White and Black | Remodelista

    Above: Viborg also comes in black on white

    Cement Tiles Designed by Erin Adams for Granada, Solna Silver Grey | Remodelista

    Above: The most minimal of Adams' designs is titled Solna, pictured above in silver on gray. 

    For all things tile-related, see our archive including Tiles from Sweden by Way of Marrakech and Wabi-Sabi Tiles from a Dutch Fashion Designer

    remodelista email subscribe

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    The winner of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards Best Professionally Designed Kitchen is Brooklyn design firm General Assembly and founder Sarah Zames.

    The firm's project was chosen as a finalist by guest judge John Derian, who called the project a "great usage of a small space—simple and chic. It makes sense with the rest of the apartment."

    N.B.: This is the third of six posts spotlighting the winners of the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards. Go to this year's Considered Design Awards page to see all the entries, finalists, and winners, and have a look at Gardenista's Considered Design Awards, too.

    Winner General Assembly, Best Professional Kitchen | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    General Assembly's Design Statement: "For this major remodel of a tiny kitchen, we kept the existing footprint but incorporated custom millwork and built-in appliances to capture every bit of functional space. Using the lines of the beams and columns, we created built-ins in the nooks and crevices and used color to highlight varying depths of the space."

    Winner General Assembly, Best Professional Kitchen | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What does your firm specialize in?
    A: We primarily do residential gut-renovation work, where customizing the space to suit the owners' needs is a priority. In addition to reconfiguring the spaces into more efficient layouts, we do a lot of custom millwork and furniture pieces that are built to suit the space. We also work on ground-up projects and commercial work occasionally, and have recently started producing custom lighting and products. We are preparing to launch a lighting and product line called Assembly Line in early 2016.

    Winner General Assembly, Best Professional Kitchen | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What were your practical goals for the project?
    A: We were working within a very tight space and the budget was definitely not unlimited. Our goal was to maximize every inch possible without breaking the bank.

    Winner General Assembly, Best Professional Kitchen | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What solutions did you find to your design problems?
    A: Rather than actually opening up the kitchen to the living room, we used bright colors to draw people's eyes to the space. The kitchen becomes a little jewel box in the corner of the apartment.

    Q: What are your favorite features of the project?
    A: The use of color and pattern through simple materials. Contrasting the subway tile with dark grout created a graphic patterned backsplash, and bringing color into the ceiling and other key areas modernized the space and directs the eye.

    Q: What was your biggest splurge?
    A: Committing to custom-built cabinetry was a decision made early on, and it was worth it. We took advantage of every corner and odd spot in a way that an off-the-shelf solution could not have. The panel-ready dishwasher was a little bit extra, but having everything streamlined and hidden in the space makes such a difference.

    Q: Where did you cut corners?
    A: We used inexpensive subway tile.

    Q: Where do you get your design inspiration?
    A: Inspiration for this project comes from all of the tiny spaces I have seen in New York over the past couple of decades living here. New Yorkers are always being presented with odd or small corners that we must maximize. Over time, any true New Yorker develops a sixth sense for coming up with creative solutions to what some may consider "spatially challenged" apartments.

    Q: What is your best secret design source?
    A: It's a bit sentimental, but we have the best staff of designers and managers—we are our own best source.

    Q: What is your favorite local shop?
    A: The Future Perfect is a great local shop—always ahead of the curve. We also love our local designers and fabricators like Souda and our neighbors RBW (Rich Brilliant Willing).

    Q: What is your next project? 
    A: We just wrapped up a house and barn renovation project upstate in the Catskills that we are very proud of. We converted an old horse barn into a guesthouse. We retained the character of the barn by repurposing stall doors, and we used a lot of great textures like concrete tile and reclaimed timber. We also have a few good projects in Manhattan and Brooklyn under construction. One of the spaces we are working on in Brooklyn Heights feels a bit like a treehouse—a smaller space built into the top floor of a beautiful old building.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    For those of us with kids or a nostalgia streak, consider the stainproof, indoor-outdoor tablecloth. There are a lot examples out there—look for oilcloth, treated cotton, and chalk cloth yardage—but even so, finding lightly coated (PVC and phthalate-free) fabrics in patterns we'd want to live with takes some digging. Here are five favorites in Scandinavian shades of blue.

    Midcentury fish-patterned Swedish oilcloth tablecloth | Remodelista

    Above: Linen-cotton Sill Oilcloth, Marianne Nilsson's midcentury herring pattern by Almedalhs of Sweden, $45 per meter from Scandinavian Design Center.

    Dash Aqua Tablecloth from RosenbergCPH | Remodelista

    Above: Aqua Dash Oilcloth from RosenbergCPH; 125 KR ($18.70) for 19.5 by 59 inches. (We also like the Tile Blue Oilcloth from RosenbergCPH.)

    Marimekko  Unikko Tablecloth | Remodelista

    Above: Marimekko's classic Unikko Blue Oilcloth is available from Textile Arts for $59 per yard. Photograph via Jennifer Hagler of A Merry Mishap

    Alvar Aalto Siena Oilcloth Fabric from Artek | Remodelista

    Above: Alvar Aalto's 1954 Siena fabric from Artek comes in blue and white, and four other combinations—and in cotton, coated cotton, and canvas. Go to Artek for details.

    Himla Coated Linen Tablecloth | Remodelista

    Above: Swedish company Himla makes a coated linen Urban Oilcloth available in several solid colors (shown above in Sky); £20 ($31.33) per meter from the Swedish Fabric Company.

    More ideas? Take a look at 7 Romantic Summery Linen Tablecloths. Also consider the painter's drop cloth and see Megan's Object Lesson on Classic Cotton and Linen Stripes 

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    "August is not a month to rein in anything," says Michelle. Find out where the wild things are on Gardenista this week. And while the grasses grow—and Michelle's husband plants his first marijuana seedling—consider some inspiring interiors, including the world's chicest hen house.

    French corrugate metal cabin by Isabel Lopez Quesada | Gardenista

    Above: The Outbuilding of the Week is a French cabin made of corrugated metal panels recycled from a chicken coup.

    Marijuana plant Blue Dreams seedling ready to plant | Gardenista

    Above: It all began with a consultation with a budtender at a dispensary in Berkeley. Read newbie gardener Josh Quittner's cannabis chronicle, The Marijuana Plant and Me: Part 1.

    Gardenista Considered Design Awards best amateur-designed garden winner, Bettina Mueller

    Above: This year's Gardenista Considered Design Awards Winners have just been announced. Here's the Best Amateur-Design Garden.

    Eve Solo self-watering herb pot | Gardenista

    Above: The plant that tends itself while you're away? Take a look at 10 Easy Pieces: Self-Watering Pots and Planters.

    Taso McKown farmhouse screened porch | Remodelista

    Above: Steal This Look: Alexa presents architects' Calvin Tsao and Zack McKown's Perfect Screened Porch. Photograph by Richard Powers for Tsao & McKown Architects.

    Go to Gardenista for rain gutter advice, drought-tolerant gossamer grasses, landscaping ideas for side yards, and more.

    For outdoor living design news, tips, and trends, sign up for the daily Gardenista newsletter

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    The winner of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards Best Professionally Designed Bath is Daleet Spector Design of Los Angeles. 

    The firm's project was chosen as a finalist by guest judge Will Taylor, who had this to say about the project: "Given my love of graphic color, I couldn't help but be delighted by the floor tile. I like that it's colorful but not juvenile, despite being designed for kids. The wooden vanity adds warmth to the blue-and-white scheme."

    N.B.: This is the fifth of six posts spotlighting the winners of the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards. Go to this year's Considered Design Awards page to see all the entries, finalists, and winners, and have a look at Gardenista's Considered Design Awards, too. Winner Daleet Spector Design, Best Professionally Designed Bath | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What does your firm specialize in?
    A: Daleet Spector Design is a collaborative design studio that specializes in residential interior design, boutique hospitality design, and product design.

    Q: Who worked on the project?
    A: Interior design by Daleet Spector, assisted by Egan Gauntt, building by EBR Construction, Inc., and photography by Lee Manning.

    Q: What were your practical goals for the project?
    A: Our goal was to enlarge the bathroom and create space for a separate shower and tub as well as two sinks for our client's two young boys.

    Q: What solutions did you find to your design problems?
    A: To enlarge the bathroom, we had to borrow space from the boys’ bedrooms on either side of the bathroom. On one side we were able to utilize a bit of one boy’s closet to recess the shower. On the other side (where the sinks are) we moved the bathroom wall over, borrowing about three feet of bedroom space, and relocated the boy’s closet and bed to the other side of the room. This allowed us to widen the bathroom and fit a separate bathtub, shower, and larger sink vanity. We also moved the window and the door to the bathroom in the remodel.

    Q: What are your favorite features of the project?
    A: The floor tile. We’re lucky our client was willing to go for a graphic pattern on the floor. We absolutely love this cement floor tile from Popham Design.

    Q: Where do you get your design inspiration?
    A: From the desert to the mountains, the California landscape is so incredible and the natural, organic elements—the beach, ocean, sky, mountains, and desert—are a constant source of inspiration. The existing architecture and the client’s style and way of life can also be major sources of design inspiration.

    Q: What was your biggest splurge?
    A: Our major splurge was the cement tile floor—this is really the major design statement in the bathroom. 

    Q: Where did you cut corners?
    A: Because the floor is so focal, we were able to cut corners by using the most basic and economical white subway tile for the shower, tub surround, and backsplash.

    Q: What is your dream project, or who is your dream client?
    A: Our dream project could be large or small in scale, there just has to be something that excites us—be it the architecture, the surroundings, or the client’s personality and aesthetic. We love projects that involve both remodeling and decorating, where we can really make a big impact. Our dream client is sophisticated yet casual, realistic with time frames as well as budgets, and completely trusts our design aesthetic—sounds very much like our client on this project! 

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    Here are a few things that caught our attention this week.

    Andy Warhol Estate in Montauk | Remodelista

    Bjork Summerhouse in Iceland | Remodelista

    The Citizenry Mexico Collection Launching August 26 | Remodelista

    Marilyn Monroe's former East Side Apartment | Remodelista

    • Above: For $27,000 a month, you can rent an Upper East Side townhouse that once belonged to Marilyn Monroe. Photograph courtesy of Town Residential. 
    • A look around H&M head of design Evelina Kraveav Söderberg's house in Stockholm. 

    Bath Fittings by Groupwork | Remodelista

    • Above: All-in-one bathroom storage from Melbourne design studio Groupwork

    Ila Sea Salt | Remodelista

    • Above: The elevated pantry: Just a few more days left to participate in Sunday Suppers' Kickstarter campaign; the debut collection includes five varieties of sea salt, maple syrup, wildflower honey, and more.

    Instagram and Pinterest Pick of the Week

    Remodelista Instagram Pick of the Week: Louise Gray Studio

    • Above: If your Instagram feed could use more bright white minimalist interiors, consider following textile designer Louise Gray (@louisegray_studio). 

    Remodelista Pinterest Pick of the Week: Bridget Park's Spaces Board

    Above: We're fans of blogger Bridget Park's Spaces board, featuring more than 18,000 pins.

    For more Remodelista, see our Modern Summerhouse issue and head over to Gardenista to read all about Untamed Gardens

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    The winner of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards Best Professionally Designed Living/Dining Space is Brooklyn firm CWB Architects and principal Brendan Coburn.

    The firm's project was chosen as a finalist by guest judge Estee Stanley, who had this to say about the project: "I love the vibe of this home. It's pretty traditional with a whiff of modern and edgy. I love how homey and warm it feels, while also managing to be elegant and beautiful."

    N.B.: This is the last of six posts spotlighting the winners of the 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards. Go to this year's Considered Design Awards page to see all the entries, finalists, and winners, and have a look at Gardenista's Considered Design Awards, too.

    Winner CWB Architects, Best Professional Living/Dining Space | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    CWB Architects' Design Statement: "This home in Brooklyn Heights needed a complete gut renovation and the new owners wanted a functional, tailored space to enjoy with their family members and guests. There was no need for a formal dining room, but rather a connected space for hanging out and entertaining."

    Winner CWB Architects, Best Professional Living/Dining Space | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What does your firm specialize in?
    A: Our firm specializes in high-end renovation and new construction residential projects. We have a particular expertise in renovating and rehabilitating 120 to 150-year-old row house buildings in historic districts. 

    Winner CWB Architects, Best Professional Living/Dining Space | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: Who worked on the winning project? 
    A: Brendan Coburn, principal. Jesse Fearins, project manager. Project team: Lesa Rozmarek and Margaret Hu. Interior design team: Erin Fearins, Catherine Brophy, and Amy Courtney.

    Winner CWB Architects, Best Professional Living/Dining Space | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What were your practical goals for the project?
    A: Our goal for the house was to create an incredibly well-detailed, very comfortable environment for our clients and their children to live and entertain in. The clients were very thoughtful about what kind of space they wanted to live in and they were open to a lot of ideas and fun to work with.

    Winner CWB Architects, Best Professional Living/Dining Space | 2015 Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Q: What solutions did you find to your design problems?
    A: As with a great deal of our row house work, we were very interested in connecting the main public rooms of the house to the garden—both physically and visually. The main solution to achieving that outcome was the creation of the two-story bay window and the opening of the floor plan on the parlor floor. Within the kitchen and within the bay window, we designed a huge and very comfortable banquette—more of a firm sofa—and a custom table. This table and the kitchen were to become the center of the house and where the family and their friends would gather for hours of chatting and eating and drinking.

    Q: What are your favorite features of the project?
    A: The bay window and banquette, the pantry, and the tub room (which you can see on our Website).

    Q: What were the hardest lessons you learned along the way?
    A: This building was more than 150 years old—no matter how bad we thought the underlying structure was, it was worse. So having the resources necessary to correct these underlying structural and infrastructural challenges is of utmost importance. 

    Q: What advice do you have for someone undertaking a similar project?
    A: Work as much as possible with the building's underlying architecture and vibe. Assume that the building will need to be largely rebuilt—have substantial contingency plans and expect to use them.

    Q: What is your dream project, or who is your dream client?  
    A: This client was pretty close to perfect. They were thoughtful about the kind of space they wanted to live in, they were very good about communicating what they were after, they were decisive throughout the process, and they had a great sense of humor. 

    Q: What is your best secret design source?
    A: My pencil and time to work without distraction.

    Q: Where do you get your design inspiration?
    A: Wandering the neighborhoods of New York City is always a good place to start. Anytime I am in another city I try to have my eyes open to the way things are being done there, and try to understand what the sources of those decisions are.

    Q: Which architects or designers do you admire?
    A: There are a lot: Deborah Berke, Rick Joy, Brian Mackay Lyons, Steven Harris, and Peter Rose. There is a clarity to their work, and an elegance to how it is executed. 

    Q: What is your next project?  
    A: We are working on a rooftop courtyard as part of a large row house renovation. It should be a fun space, as it blends indoor and outdoor in an unusual way.

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    Summer is drawing to a close; here are a few of our favorite design moments from our favorite season.

    Jessica Helgerson bunk room | Remodelista

    Above: A summer bunk room by Portland, Oregon, designer Jessica Helgerson.

    Monday

    General Architecture Summer House in Sweden | Remodelista

    Above: In Monday's Architect Visit, we drop in on the perfect Swedish summerhouse. 

    Tuesday

    Heerinhuis Table | Remodelista

    Above: We're highlighting our favorite farmhouse tables in our Furniture section.

    Wednesday

      Brookline Sheets | Remodelista

    Above: Meredith rounds up the best of the new bedding disrupters in our Fabrics & Linens department.

    Thursday

    Smitten Studio Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: In our Remodeling 101 department, Janet looks at the ins and outs of butcherblock countertops.

    Friday

    Niprig Pendant Light from Ikea | Remodelista

    Above: To finish out the week, we've assembled our favorite summery natural fiber pendants in our Lighting section.

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    Erik Persson of Stockholm-based General Architecture is a preservationist in the best sense; when it came time to build his own summerhouse, he found a derelict barn, dismantled it, and moved it to a more advantageous location. There's no electricity, no indoor bathroom, and a rudimentary kitchen.

    Nannberg House in Sweden by General Architecture | Remodelista

    Above: Persson added a second level to the existing structure; the second floor is divided into two load-bearing walls that allow the first floor to be entirely open.

    General Architecture in Sweden | Remodelista

    Above: The living room is anchored by a Borge Mogensen sofa. Photograph via Monocle.

    Nannberg House in Sweden by General Architecture | Remodelista

    Above: An inset window flanked by a wall-mounted brass Svenskt Tenn candleholder.

    General Architecture Kitchen in Sweden | Remodelista

    Above: The simple, unfitted kitchen. Photograph via Monocle.

    General Architecture in Sweden | Remodelista

    Above: A wood staircase leads to the newly added second floor. Photograph via Monocle.

    Nannberg House in Sweden by General Architecture | Remodelista

    Above: The second floor is simple and spare.

    General Architecture in Sweden | Remodelista

    Above: The outhouse. Photograph via Monocle.

    See more posts like this in Architect Visit.

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    Jamie Blake of Blakes London applied a high/low mix of materials—from marble to readymade beadboard—in his design for a sun-splashed kitchen. We featured the house in Endless Summer in a London Victorian. Thanks to the popularity of the kitchen, Blake has kindly offered to share its secrets.

    Kitchen designed by Jamie Blake of Blakes London | Remodelista

    Above: The open kitchen is fronted by a marble-topped island built from wood textured to look like reclaimed timber. "The best way to describe the design is an exploration into textures," says Blake, ticking off a list of materials that includes porcelain floor tiles, beadboard paneling, subway tiles, and painted brick. Note that the designer carefully hewed to a subtly contrasting pale palette offset by dark overhead cabinets and a trough of herbs sprouting in the middle of the island. Photograph from Blakes London.

    Kitchen designed by Jamie Blake of Blakes London | Remodelista

    Above: The upper cabinets have a surprise lining of white subway tiles with dark grout. Only clear glassware lines the shelves, allowing the design to shine through. Photograph from Blakes London.

    The Materials

    Carrara marble | Remodelista

    Above: The countertops and backsplashes are Carrara marble. Considering splurging on marble in your own kitchen? See Remodeling 101: Marble Countertop Pros and Cons and read Michelle's cautionary tale, My Dirty Secret: How I Learned to Live with a Marble Backsplash.

    Farrow & Ball Railings Paint Color | Remodelista

    Above: The cabinets are painted a Farrow & Ball dark charcoal called Railings; $97 a gallon.

    Home Depot Metro Subway Tile | Remodelista

    Above: The cupboard's Metro White Matt Flat Wall Tiles came from Tons of Tiles in the UK; £0.32 (50 cents) per tile. Home Depot sells miniature one-by-two-inch Metro Subway Matte White Wall Tile, shown here, for $5.95 per square foot, and two-by-seven-inch Metro Soho Subway Tile Glossy White for $6.97 per square foot. For a top-of-the-line, handmade version, consider Heath Ceramics Modern Basics tiles. Subway tiles can be patterned in a number of ways; see our White Tile Pattern Glossary.

      Elmwood antique barn wood reclaimed timber paneling | Remodelista

    Above: What looks like old wood, Blake reveals, isn't reclaimed timber: "It's a finish that we do ourselves, completely handmade to look like reclaimed timber. Almost any color or texture can be achieved." Since Blake's technique is labor intensive (not to mention proprietary), we suggest sourcing Reclaimed Barn Wood. It's available in a wide range of finishes, including a whitewashed version, from Elmwood Reclaimed Timber, in Peculiar, Missouri.

    Lowe's Hardware Wall Paneling MDF Fiberboard | Remodelista

    Above: Not every detail in the kitchen is rarefied. On the back wall, what looks like old-fashioned, carpenter-built tongue-and-groove wood paneling is prefabricated MDF fiberboard. It can be sourced at building supply stores, such as Lowe's, where White/Satin Hardboard Wall Paneling is $19.98 for an approximately four-by-eight-foot panel. For more ways to put it to use, see our Rehab Diaries: DIY Beadboard Ceilings and The DIY Kitchen Overhaul for Under $500.

    European Heritage wood effect porcelain floor and wall tile | Remodelista

    Above: Another surprise is the floor: What looks like whitewashed wood is actually white porcelain timber-effect tiles. "They're all the craze in the UK right now," says Blake. "Porcelain tiles are in many cases more affordable than wood floors, require much less maintenance, and are great with underfoot heating—in the winter the floor has a warm feel, and in the summer a cool one." The kitchen's tiles are Origine Cire Wood Effect Porcelain Tile, shown here, from London company European Heritage; inquire about pricing. Also consider, Marazzi's US-made Harmony Porcelain Tiles, created with inkjet technology and available in four "wood effects." For the lowdown on heating your house underfoot, see Remodeling 101: 5 Things to Know About Radiant Floor Heating.

    Faucet

    Copper pipe, elbows, and adapters for DIY projects | Remodelista  

    Above: The kitchen faucet was built on site by a plumber. Feeling handy? How-to site Instructables explains How to Build Your Own Copper Pipe Faucet. You can source a variety of copper parts, including piping, elbows, and pressure cup adapters, shown here, at Home Depot; five feet of half-inch Copper Pipe is $17.98. Want to start with an easier copper pipe project? DIY: Copper Pipe Curtain Rods for $35. Photograph by Izabella Simmons.

    Lighting

    Cox ad Cox Co pendant lights | Remodelista

    Above: The trio of Twisted Flex & Copper Pendant Lights hanging over the island are by Cox & Cox of London; £43 ($67) each. For an energy-efficient alternative, consider the Plumen Drop Cap Pendant Set in Copper; $44.95 (and read World's Most Stylish Light Bulb, Version 002).

    Industrial Scissor Wall Lamp by Long Made Co. | Remodelista

    Above: Industrial Scissor Wall Lamps were sourced from Etsy seller Long Made Co. of Houston; $175 each. For more of their work, see our post The New Industrials

    Accessories

    Tinware Creamer from Canvas Home | Remodelista

    Above: Canvas Home's 3 1/4-inch-tall Tinware Creamer is actually glazed stoneware (with mock chips); $8.50.

      Grand Vin Carafe from Crate & Barrel | Remodelista

    Above: Crate & Barrel's Grand Vin Carafe is $14.95.

    Ikea Henderling Red Wine Glass | Remodelista

    Above: Ikea's Hederlig Red Wine Glasses are $1.99 each.

    Stainless Steel bottle trough from Central Restaurant Supply | Remodlelista

    Above: In the middle of the kitchen island—territory that often goes unused—Blake inserted a custom stainless steel planter that holds pots of herbs. It can also be used to store bottles of wine and countless other kitchen things. To make your own inset, consider the 34-by-4 1/2-inch Stainless Steel Bottle Trough from Central Restaurant Supply; $45.79. For a similar idea, see DIY: A Picnic Table with a Built-In Wine Bar.

    Dualit Colored Toaster | Remodelista

    Above: The Dualit New Generation Classic Two-Slice Toaster comes in 11 colors, including cream; $239.95 from Williams-Sonoma.

    Dualit Electric Tea Kettle | Remodelista

    Above: The electric Dualit 1 Litre Jug Kettle in canvas white (also available in black) is £49.50 ($78) from John Lewis. Larger sizes available.

    Riess Enamelware Aromapot in Off White | Remodelista

    Above: The Riess Enamel Aromapot by Viennese industrial designers Dottings comes in a range of sizes and stacks for compact storage; $188 for the half liter size on Amazon. The Aromapot is also available from Rodale's for $188, and in a smaller size for $158. Read about the design in the Remodelista 100, a list of our favorite everyday objects.

    Explore more Steal This Look posts, including A Low-Cost Kitchen for Serious Cooks. And over at Gardenista, learn how to re-create A Romantic Outdoor Kitchen in Puglia.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on July 29, 2014, as part of our Summery Kitchens issue.

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    An old-fashioned summer staple in the Napa Valley where I live is a plastic bag filled with water and hung from farmhouse back doors. It took me a while to realize that this not-so-glamorous device is an effective way to keep flies and other summer insects at bay (alas, mosquitoes are not deterred).

    Leave it to the chaps at Kaufmann Mercantile to source a good-looking equivalent: the Anti-Fly Glass Sphere by Mexico City designer José de la O of Studio José de la O. No excuse now not to give it a go.   

    Anti-Fly Glass Sphere with Leather Rope | Remodelista

    Above: The Anti-Fly Glass Sphere hangs from a leather rope and is $99. 

    Anti-Fly Glass Sphere with Leather Rope | Remodelista

    Above: It is the refraction of light against the water that confuses insects, especially flies, and keeps them away.

    Anti-Fly Glass Sphere with Leather Rope | Remodelista

    Above: De la O worked with a family-run glass-blowing business in Mexico City to create these mouth-blown vessels. Just fill with water and suspend near food.

    Looking to add to your insect arsenal? See Gardenista's Five Favorite Fly Swatters and consider making a batch of Alexa's DIY: Bug Repellent Balm. And if the bugs still bite, have a look at Erin's Natural Mosquito Bite Remedies (used tea bags are one of the seven solutions).

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on July 2, 2014, as part of our Block Party issue.

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    LA creative director and designer Sarah Sherman Samuel and her husband, Rupert Samuel, thought nothing of tearing out the cabinets in their LA bungalow with their own bare hands. We've been watching them in action via Samuel's blog Smitten Studio. The two are can-do sorts, but not so handy that they could tackle building the replacements. Nor were they ready to shell out for a cabinetmaker. Instead they took the high/low road: They bought Ikea cabinets and turned to LA-based company SemiHandmade to put up a good front. As Sarah explains: "The genius part is that at Ikea you can buy the cabinets without the doors and drawer faces, so then by getting those at SemiHandmade, you end up with beautifully crafted and high-quality doors and drawers, but it's still less expensive than a custom kitchen. It's like the ultimate Ikea hack."

    Photography by Sarah Sherman Samuel.

    Smitten Studio's Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: Sarah puts a cabinet door in place. The cabinetry all came from Ikea; the doors and drawer fronts are the work of SemiHandmade, which uses Ikea's plans (or architectural plans or even legible sketches) to create customized fronts. Sarah chose SemiHandmade's DIY Shaker design, which is made of maple with MDF inset panels (and is called DIY because the wood is untreated and unstained). 

    Smitten Studio's Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: The cabinet doors freshly painted in Farrow & Ball's Pigeon await installation. "Originally we were going to paint the doors and drawer fronts ourselves," Sarah writes in her chronicle of the project. "I researched spray guns and read up on different DIY techniques, but in the end we hired a professional. By the time I factored in the price of the sprayer and considered all the time it would take me, it turns out hiring the professional ended up being more cost-effective."

    She settled on the color by painting foam core boards with several possibilities and moving the boards around over days to see how they looked in different lights. She was initially inclined to go with a dark shade, but during the testing process this nuanced gray-green emerged the winner. 

    Smitten Studio's Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: Rupert assembles the Ikea shelves. Sarah reports that they were able to follow the Ikea instructions without going too cross-eyed, and that it took the two of them a full day to install the SemiHandmade doors and drawer fronts: "The drawer fronts snapped in quick like lightening, but hanging the doors and adjusting the hinges took a bit of time."

    Smitten Studio's Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: SemiHandmade ships its designs across the country and is planning to set up showrooms near some of the largest Ikea stores (it's currently in Burbank, California, two miles from Ikea). Wondering about costs? The company reports that most clients spend $5,000 to $10,000 on its doors, panels, and drawer faces to complete a room. Ikea cabinet boxes and hardware typically cost $1,000 to $3,000, and, if you pay for assembly and installation, that generally runs $1,500 to $2,000—so projects generally total somewhere between $8,000 and $15,000.

    Smitten Studio's Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: Sarah's high/low approach extends to the fixtures and finishes: The apron sink is from Ikea—the Domsjo; $185.99—while the counter and backsplash is Calacatta Gold marble. The kitchen is shown here nearly finished—cabinet and drawer pulls are still to come.

    Smitten Studio's Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: "I've always wanted a kitchen with marble countertops," says Sarah. "I know they aren't the most durable or practical, but come on, the heart wants what the heart wants." She selected the slabs at an LA marble yard and expected to go for Carrara, but discovered "Carrara is generally more gray with smaller veins, and Calacatta is whiter with more dramatic veins. The slab I found was very white and the veins have the prettiest range of colors, including touches of gold and green."

    Smitten Studio's Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: Further departing from Ikea, Sarah chose a high-end faucet in a brushed bronze finish: Brizo's Solna design, which has a hidden pull-down spray wand at the tip of its spout.

    Smitten Studio's Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: Sarah test drives her own designs on the new counter. The Walnut Serving Board Hexagon ($48) is from her online shop, Sunny Afternoon, which specializes in picnic wares (most of them made by Sarah and her father). N.B.: The shop is currently on hiatus while Sarah works on her new website.

    Ikea Upgrade: The Semihandmade Kitchen Remodel | Remodelista

    Above: Here's a glimpse of the kitchen with the new handles in place—Sarah says she waited for months, until her father was visiting, and got him to install them. They're brass Lewis Dolin Bar Pulls from MyKnobs.com.

    Smitten Studio Ikea hack kitchen remodel | Remodelista

    Above: The kitchen opens to the living room and dining area. Upper cabinets flank the kitchen window but fade into the background thanks to the fact that they're painted white—Wimborne White from Farrow & Ball—to blend with the walls. SemiHandmade supplied the bar front; the stools are from Organic Modernism. Go to Smitten Studio for more details, including Before shots of the kitchen. 

    More ways to customize Ikea? Have a look at Superfront, makers of cabinet upgrades; Bemz, which specializes in transformative slipcovers; and Pretty Pegs, a line of custom furniture legs—all made for Ikea designs.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on February 17, 2014, as part of our Great Danes issue.

    Remodelista subscribe | Remodelista

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    The advantages to wall-mounted, modular shelving systems are myriad: They can be engineered to fit any space, and unlike built-ins, they can be disassembled and reinstalled if you relocate. Here's a roundup of our finds.

    Royal System Shelving Unit C | Remodelista

    Above: The Royal System Shelving Unit C is available in oak and walnut and priced at $5,985 at Design Within Reach.

    Vitsoe 606 Universal Shelving System, designed by Dieter Rams

    Above: The iconic Vitsoe 606 Universal Shelving System, designed by Dieter Rams in 1960, is a favorite of design aficionados. The system offers infinite configurations: various shelf widths and lengths, drawers, and desks available to suit any storage needs. An aluminum E-track and pin enables the shelves and cabinets to be easily hung and configured as needed. The Vitsoe is an investment, but it's a system you can add to over the years; the setup shown above costs $6,020; the cabinets run at around $1,000 each (four shown), and the shelves between $90 and $100, depending on length. Available in black, off-white, and beech, exclusively in the US through the Vitsoe Shop in New York and online at Vitsoe.

    Atlas Industries Modular Storage System | Remodelista

    Above: Made in Brooklyn, the Atlas Industries as4 Shelving System is available in white oak, maple, and walnut with sturdy steel brackets (custom color paint is also an option). The 91-inch-wide white oak configuration with desk included above costs $9,525. Components are priced individually; the full pricing list is available on the Atlas site (along with an easy as4 Builder Guide).

    wall-mounted Eiermann Shelving Unit designed in 1932 by German architect Egon Eiermann.

    Above: The wall-mounted Eiermann Shelving Unit was designed in 1932 by German architect Egon Eiermann. Now produced by Richard Lampert, the Eiermann shelves feature stainless steel supports and shelves available in white melamine, solid oak, and white powder-coated finish. The Five-Shelf Eiermann Shelving Unit is available at Twenty Twenty-One; pricing begins at £722 ($1,127). Contact Richard Lampert for details and retailers.

    String Shelf Storage System | Remodelista

    Above: The classical String shelf modular system was designed in 1946 by Swedish architect and designer Nils "Nisse" Strinning. The String Pocket Shelf is available for $195 in the US from Nordic Design. The full String Shelf System shown in oak and white above is available in the UK for £1,275 ($1,989) from Nest.

    Ekby Järpen Wall-Mounted Shelf from Ikea | Remodelista

    Above: The Ekby Järpen/Ekby Gällö Wall Shelf in White is $74.97 at Ikea.

    Cappellini Aliante Wall-Mounted Shelving System | Remodelista

    Above: The Aliante Shelving System by Rodolf Dordoni for Capellini is available with polished chromed nickel supports and shelves in oak or mahogany. The shelves are available directly through Cappellini and at Nest.co.uk for £2,130 ($3,322).

    Helix Acacia Bookcase from CB2 | Remodelista

    Above: The Helix White Oak 70-Inch Wall-Mounted Bookcase features four fixed blond quartersawn oak veneer shelves on a squared metal tube frame of powder-coated carbon that can be mounted across a wall. Each ladder is 30 inches wide and 70 inches in height; $199 from CB2.

    Raks Shelving System | Remodelista

    Above: Favored by architects and widely used in university settings, the straightforward, well-engineered Rakks System offers well priced durable shelving manufactured in Needham, Massachusetts, by the Rangine Corporation. Components and pricing available at Rakks Store.

    Driftwood and Platinum Elfa Living Room Shelving

    Above: A budget option from the Container Store, the Driftwood and Platinum Elfa Living Room Shelving is $394.69 (as shown above), also available with individual components.

    See more Storage ideas in our posts.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on May 19, 2010, as part of our Outdoor Living issue.

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    Spotted all over of late: splatter patterns on wallpaper, sheets, tableware, even lampshades. 

    Black Enamel Spatterware Merci in Paris | Remodelista

    Above: Merci in Paris is doing brisk business with their splatter enamelware from US manufacturer Crow Canyon; shown above, a display from Merci's pop-up shop at Salone Mobile in Milan last spring. 

    Splatter Light and Bowl | Remodelista

    Above L: The made-to-order Flying Scotsman Gray Marble English Ceramic Light from Dyke & Dean is £570 ($860.79). Above R: A set of Five Graniteware Nesting Bowls from Barn Light Electric is $130 (see more at Colorful Enamelware Made in the US).

    Justine Hand Cape Cod Splatter Paint Floors | Remodelista

    Above: Justine Hand's splatter-painted floors. For more, see DIY: New England Spatter-Painted Floors and The Soulful Side of Old Cape Cod.

    Emma Bridgewater for Liberty of London Splatterware | Remodelista

    Above L and R: Emma Bridgewater limited-edition splatterware pieces in black and white for Liberty in London. For something similar, consider Emma Bridgewater's Splatterware Mug for £19.95 ($30) and Splatterware Plate in blue for £19.95 ($30).

    Helen Levi Spatter Mug | Remodelista

    Above: The splatter Artist's Mug (L) by Brooklyn ceramicist Helen Levi is $48.

    March SF Splatter Painted Platter | Remodelista

    Above: March in SF offers a line of handmade glazed, splattered terracotta from a family-run workshop in Puglia; the Black on White 20.75-Inch Splatterware Platter is $225 (see more at Now Serving: Splatterware Ceramics from Italy).

    Splatter Painted Fabrics and Wallpaper | Remodelista

    Above L: Ralph Lauren's Painters Studio Kraft wallcovering. Above R: Pierre Frey's Jackson Pollock–inspired Leo linen fabric.

    Hinson Spatter Paint Wallpaper | Remodelista

    Above: Hinson's Navy on White Splatter Wallpaper is available through Decorators Best. Photograph via Eddie Ross.

    Labour and Wait Marbled Tableware | Remodelista

    Above L: Marbled Enamel Dinner Plate Navy; £8.50 ($12.84): Above R: Marbled Enamel Mug Navy; £7 ($10.57) from Labour and Wait.

    What's next? Take a look at our Trend Alerts, including The Top 15 Interiors Trends of 2015.

    This post is an update; the original ran on January 27, 2015, as part of our House Envy issue.

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    In the lazy heat of summer, nothing feels better than a gentle nap taken on a hanging bed; all the better when there's a breeze included. Here are 10 favorites. 

    Hanging bed with rustic log base, Remodelista

    Above: A rustic bedframe offsets the floaty white decor. Photograph via VTWonen.

    Hanging daybed in Charleston, Remodelista

    Above: For a holiday at home, ceiling fans, an outdoor fireplace, and a daybed suspended from the ceiling all play a part in creating a holiday vibe in this poolside cabana. See Holiday at Home: Charleston Edition and take a look at the pool.

    Hanging platform bed by lakeside, Remodelista

    Above: Canadian architect John McMinn's children enjoy the family "nap swing." Photograph by Lorne Bridgman via Dwell.

    hanging bed home depot

    Above: Spotted on Home Depot's Home Improvement blog: How to Build a Hanging Bed, a detailed DIY on building your own porch bed with a downloadable, printable PDF with complete instructions and tools and materials.

    Hanging bed on porch by O'Neill Rose, Remodelista

    Above: Swinging bliss in Connecticut. For more on the porch, see Architect Is In: Porch Appreciation in Connecticut

    modern porch swing

    Above: A hanging bed spotted on Ouno.

    Three hanging beds on a lakeside porch, Remodelista

    Above: Three hanging beds turn a screened porch into an outdoor summer bedroom. Photograph by Quentin Bacon

    Hanging bed in screened porch in Atalanta, Remodelista

    Above: A key element in creating a sleeping porch on the side of blogger Pamela Berger's house in Atlanta is her hanging bed. Photograph via Sweet Peach.

    Summer beds need summer bedding. See Summer Slumbers: Hedge House Bed Rolls Made in LA or 10 Easy Pieces: Striped Sheets for some of our favorite summer essentials.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on June 20, 2013, as part of our Summerhouse issue.

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