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    Spotted on Swedish online shop Artilleriet: the perfect white enamel summer drinks dispenser. Here's a US source to get the same dispenser (without the international shipping hassle).

    White Enamel Drinks Dispenser | Remodelista

    Above: The portly Enamel Beverage Dispenser is 999 Kroners ($127) at Artilleriet; in the US, the Enamel Drink Dispenser is $79 from Urban Outfitters.

    White Enamel Drinks Dispenser | Remodelista

    Above: The dispenser holds 3.5 gallons.

    White Enamel Drinks Dispenser | Remodelista

    Above: The stainless nozzle.

    See more of our favorites at 10 Easy Pieces: Summer Drinks Dispensers—and fill them with Gardenista's Herb- and Fruit-Infused Thirst Quencers.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    Meet the catchall of the moment: Elevated versions of the old workbench staple are being used to hold everything from tableware to totes. Here are 11 inspired examples made with simple wooden dowels, where to buy and a DIY included.

    Pegboard from VT Wonen |  Remodelista

    Above: A pegboard wall kitted out with black shelves via Dutch site Vtwonen.

    Peg It All from Kreis Design London | Remodelista

    Above: A recent discovery at ICFF in New York, London-based designer Nikki Kreis's Peg-It-All Wall-Hung Storage Panels. This example starts at £153 ($232.62) from Kreis Design. Kreis also makes Desk Tidies out of birch plywood, including the pencil cup shown here.

    Hall in Montreuil, France by Kalb Lempereur Interior Designers | Remodelista

    Above: Plenty of places to hang your hat in a Montreuil, France, entry by Kalb Lempereur Interior Designers.

    DIY pegboard organizer via The Merry Thought | Remodelista

    Above: The DIY Pegboard Wall Organizer created by A Merry Thought; go to the blog for instructions.

    A Dutch Small Utility Closet I Remodelista

    Above: The storage nook we could all use: a closet converted into an orderly utility space complete with pegboard wall. Find all the details in Steal This Look.

    Loyal Supply Co., Somerville, MA | Remodelista

    Above: Custom pegboards display the wares at Loyal Supply Co., a new home office supplies and housewares store in Somerville, Massachusetts. 

    Pegboard by Block | Remodelista

    Above: From UK company Block Design, the Orange Pegboard has multicolored pegs and comes in four sizes, starting at £25 ($38) for the mini. Blue, gray, yellow, white, and natural pegboards also available.

    Studio Tack custom pegboard in a guest room at the Dogfish Inn | Remodelista

    Above: Guest rooms at the Dogfish Inn, a boutique motel and brewery on the Delaware Coast, have custom Studio Tack pegboards stocked with beach chairs and bags. See more of the hotel at Bed and Beer

    Bang Bang pegboards by Australian designers George & Willy | Remodelista

    Above: From Australia, George & Willy's modular Bang Bang Pegboards come in naked wood and white; $258.22 USD each (shelving and extra pegs also available). Here's our other favorite George & Willy design: A Wall-Mounted Kraft Paper Dispenser.

    Pegboard from Inside Out magazine | Remodelista

    Above: An everything-but-the-kitchen-sink pegboard via Australian magazine Inside Out.

    Scoreboard coat hangers by We Do Wood | Remodelista

    Above: Scoreboard Wardrobe coat hangers by Danish design studio We Do Wood are made of bamboo and come with 12 colored pegs; €170 ($186) from Connox; go to We Do Wood for other retailers around the world.

    For the pegboard that started our obsession, see DIY: Pegboard Kitchen Organization Inspired by Julia Child. Also consider Wooden Storage Pegs and Shaker Peg Rails. Find more Storage & Organization ideas in our gallery of rooms and spaces.

      Remodelista Awards 2015 | Remodelista

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Every home needs a set of basic white dinnerware. And, in our opinion, one classic set should be sturdy enough for everyday use and graceful enough for special occasions. Here are our top 10 picks.

    Most pieces are sold individually or as a 5- or 16-piece set.

    Essential Dinnerware Crate Barrel I Remodelista  

    Above: The affordable Essential Dinnerware collection from Crate & Barrel is made of durable porcelain that's dishwasher, microwave, and warm-oven safe. An Essential Dinner Plate costs $4.95 from Crate & Barrel. 

    Teema Dinnerware Collection I Remodelista  

    Above: A Scandinavian classic designed in 1952 by Kaj Franck, Teema Dinnerware by Iittala comes in six colors, including white. The pieces are sold individually; dinner plates are $26 at All Modern. In Object Lessons, Megan explains the story behind Franck's design.

    Brasserie All-White-Dinnerware Place Settings by Williams-Sonoma I Remodelista  

    Above: The Brasserie All-White Dinnerware 16-Piece Place Setting from Williams-Sonoma costs $179. Each piece is also sold individually. 

    Billy Cotton Dinner Plate from March SF I Remodelista  

    Above: Billy Cotton's White Dinnerware is made of stoneware dipped in a white glaze. A Dinner Plate costs $15 at March in San Francisco. 

    jasper-conran-white-bone-china-remodelista  

    Above: The iconic everyday Jasper Conran White Bone China at Wedgwood features simple and classic lines. A White Bone China Dinner Plate costs $30 from Wedgwood. 

    Alessi Platebowlcup Line I Remodelista  

    Above: Jasper Morrison’s PlateBowlCup line of sturdy bone china dinnerware for Alessi is $55 for a five-piece-set from Didrik's. 

    Frank Dinnerware from CB2 | Remodelista

    Above: CB2's Frank Dinnerware line is "inspired by 1920s Bauhaus design"; a Frank Dinner Plate is $5.95.

    Chez Panisse Line Heath Ceramics I Remodelista

    Above: Named after the Alice Waters's Chez Panisse restaurant, this line takes its cues from classic porcelain restaurant ware. A five-piece Chez Panisse place setting costs $200 from Heath Ceramics, and is available in white, off-white, and gray. 

    Organic Shape Dinnerware from West Elm I Remodelista

    Above: West Elm offers several simple white dinnerware options. Their Organic-Shaped Dinnerware Set is made of pure white glazed porcelain; $32 for a set of four dinner plates. 

    John Pawson Dinnerware for When Objects Work | Remodelista

    Above: Designed by the British architect for When Objects Work, the John Pawson Ceramic Plates and Bowls start at $60 for the John Pawson Small Bowl from March in SF.

     See more Tabletop picks: 

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    One small step (maybe even a giant leap) for lamps, tables, and nightstands: designs from Ikea with built-in wireless charging for smartphones. The pieces have just arrived or are expected imminently in Ikea stores across the US and the UK.

    Ikea's new wireless charging furniture spring 2015 | Remodelista

    Above: The new Ikea Wireless Charging Range comes with built-in charging stations—just place your phone on the charging pad and juice up, no outlets or cables required. The hitch: Your smartphone has to have Qi wireless charging, which not all do—but Ikea also sells iPhone and Samsung Galaxy Wireless Phone Covers for $15 to $25 that make them compatible.

    Ikea's new wireless charging furniture spring 2015 | Remodelista

    Above: The Sellje (a nightstand or front-hall table) is made of powder-coated steel; $59.99, built-in wireless charger included.

    The collection is online at Ikea Great Britain, but has yet to launch on the US site.

    Ikea's new wireless charging furniture spring 2015 | Remodelista

    Above: The powder-coated steel and nylon Varv table lamp is $69.99. X marks the charging spot.

    Ikea's new wireless charging lamp | Remodelista

    Above: The painted steel Riggad work lamp, $79.99, has a birch charging pad.

    Ikea's new wireless charging side table | Remodelisat

    Above: The powder-coated steel Nordli nightstand (also shown in the first photo) is $109.99.

    Ikea's new wireless charging furniture spring 2015 | Remodelista

    Above: Noting that cell phones have infiltrated every part of the house, Ikea's designers came up with these portable single and triple charging pads, $27.99 and $64.99, that can be used on any flat surface. The gray and white boxes are Ikea Romma cord management containers.

    Ikea also sells Jyssen wireless chargers that can be inset into the cord outlets of some Ikea desk designs and, with a drilled hole, any furniture. A cautionary note from Gizmodo: "Wireless charging probably isn't the best thing for the lifespan of your device's battery. (It generates excess heat.) But it sure is convenient."

    Ikea portable wireless phone charger | Remodelista

    Above: The Nordmarke single pad for wireless charging; $27.99.

    Ikea Varv floor lamp with wireless phone charger | Remodelista

    Above: The Varv floor lamp is $119. See the full collection in Ikea's Wireless Charging announcement.

    Here are a few more of our favorite new Ikea designs:

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015  

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    Solve summer rental decor woes with these seven DIY projects involving nothing more than a couple of canvas painter's drop cloths. 

    Spruceton Inn Catskills | Remodelista

    Above: At the Spruceton Inn in the Catskills, the owners use laundered painter's drop cloths as summer bedspreads.

    Hitoshi Uchida Canvas Couch Cover | Remodelista

    Above: Wrapped in a drop cloth, a sofa becomes a Christo-like work of art; this one is in antiques store owner Hitoshi Uchida's home in Kamakura, Japan. Photograph via The Selby.

    DIY Dropcloth Curtain | Remodelista

    Above: The Five-Minute, No Sew Drop Cloth Curtain via Thoughts from Alice.

    Painters Drop Cloth Pergola | Remodelista

    Above: Jenny of Anything Pretty used drop cloths to create a shaded pergola.

    Modern Farmette Table Cloth | Remodelista

    Above: A laundered drop cloth as instant table cover via Modern Farmette.

    Canvas Chair Cover | Remodelista

    Above: Allison Bloom of Dehn Bloom Design used a painter's drop cloth to make an outdoor chair cover, see DIY: Paulistano Armchair with White Canvas Cover.

    DIY Drop Cloth Hammock | Remodelista

    Above: Replicate the Le Beanock Hammock with Gardenista's project: DIY: Instant Summer Hammock.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    Sarah Trotter, principal of Melbourne interior architecture firm Hearth Studio, has a special passion for kitchen design. An avid cook, she's one half of the popular Aussie food blog Trotski & Ash and a biweekly recipe contributor to The Guardian. She's also an architect, and carefully researches her clients' cooking habits before doing any designing. She's a stylist, too—so although function comes first for Trotter, beauty isn't far behind. 

    Here, she updated a 1970s kitchen, replacing its cork flooring and melamine cupboards with custom built-ins, intuitive organization, and an island with an incorporated marble pastry board.

    Photography by Christo Crocker.

    Black, Wood, and White Kitchen in Melbourne by Hearth Studio | Remodelista

    Above: Designed for two academics, one of whom is a dedicated baker and cook, the kitchen's central island offers generous counter space for making homemade bread, pastry, and pasta. It has storage on all sides, and the marble pastry board covers one end. The gray pendant lights are vintage Louis Poulsen from Danish modern showroom Grandfathers Axe of Melbourne.

    Black, Wood, and White Kitchen in Melbourne by Hearth Studio | Remodelista

    Above: The solid wood countertops are American oak, custom made by Alex Rains Furniture of Melbourne. A backsplash of white geometric tile from Academy Tiles blends into the rough plaster wall, and the window overlooks the weathered brick building next door.

    Black, Wood, and White Kitchen in Melbourne by Hearth Studio | Remodelista

    Above: Cooking knives, wooden spoons, and Dutch ovens are within easy reach of the modestly sized range. Cabinets and drawers are made of American oak veneer.

    Black, Wood, and White Kitchen in Melbourne by Hearth Studio | Remodelista

    Above: Trotter put every inch of available space to work, as demonstrated by the cabinetry surrounding the refrigerator and oven. The oak veneer cabinets neatly fit cutting boards and oven pans. The dark cabinets are birch plywood stained with a natural black finish. 

    Black, Wood, and White Kitchen in Melbourne by Hearth Studio | Remodelista

    Above: On the opposite wall, a full-height cabinet made of white-stained birch plywood offers generous storage.

    Black, Wood, and White Kitchen in Melbourne by Hearth Studio | Remodelista

    Above: Trotter's clients often work from home, so she designed a "tea-and-toast station" for daytime grazing. As a backsplash, she inset a star pattern using a blue version of the white wall tile. 

    Black, Wood, and White Kitchen in Melbourne by Hearth Studio | Remodelista

    Above: On the island, a meeting of Carrara marble, American oak, black-stained birch plywood, and brass. 

    See more by Hearth Studio in Steal This Look: A Brick Bathroom, Romantic Green Tub Included and Outbuilding of the Week: Garage Turned Studio Apartment

    Tour a few more of our favorite kitchens:

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    A testament to the power of white paint. Of the few pieces of furniture with me today, one of my favorites is the least expensive. A while back I found a coffee table on the street in SF (at first I dismissed it for its off-putting wood stain); after a coat of white paint, it was transformed. So when I received a hand-me-down set of high-quality kitchen knives from my family, complete with a yellowish wooden block, I applied the same painting principle and came out with something pretty decent.

    This DIY is less of a step-by-step tutorial and more of an idea: a way to transform tired, unappealing household items with a coat of white paint.

    White Painted Knife Block DIY | Remodelista

    Above: Photograph of my San Francisco apartment by Erin Boyle of Reading My Tea Leaves.

    J.A. Henckels International Classic 11-Slot Hardwood Knife Block | Remodelista

    Above: The wooden knife block my family deaccessioned is the J.A. Henckels International Classic 11-Slot Hardwood Knife Block, available for $19.99 at Bed Bath & Beyond. I wasn't very fond of the embossed logo on the front, so I applied an extra coat of paint to fill it in; now you can hardly detect it. These knife blocks come finished, so you can either sand them down or decide not to be too precious about nicks in the paint and apply touch-ups every few months as needed. A similar block for a few dollars less is the 13-Slot Wood Knife Block; $11.99 at Webstaurant Store.

    Benjamin Moore Ben Interior Paint in Eggshell | Remodelista

    Above: I used leftover paint from the walls of my apartment: Benjamin Moore's Ben Interior Paint in Steam. Its eggshell finish has proven useful for wiping down the block after messy countertop food prep. A gallon of the paint is $37.99 from Benjamin Moore.

    An example of the white-paint principle applied across the home comes from interior designer Michaela Scherrer. Her humble but stylish home in Pasadena, California, is gently whitewashed for spa-like effect—she even paints old cardboard boxes for collecting loose items. See a glimpse of her house in A Grecian-Inspired Guest Suite in LA and take a full tour in Remodelista: A Manual for the Considered Home.

    Also don't miss fashion and design company Totokaelo's Seattle Office, whitewashed down to the printers and pencil sharpeners.

    For more kitchen DIY projects, see our posts:

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

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    Honestly, I didn't know that cleaning your washing machine was a thing. I mean, it gets cleaned every time you wash your clothes, right? 

    Wrong. If you think about it, your washing machine is constantly bombarded with bits of food, fibers, and other organic materials that can get caught in the nooks and crannies. Also the wet, warm environment inside your machine is a perfect breeding ground for mildew and mold, especially in the hard-to-reach areas, which may never completely dry. Third, detergents and hard water can build up, which can dull your clothes and clog the mechanisms. In short, all this grime equals a less than pristine machine.

    To learn how best to naturally clean a machine, I turned to my friend Marnie, a laundry goddess who showed me the ropes in her own laundry room. 

    Photography by Justine Hand.

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, supplies, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: Just a few simple ingredients that you probably already have on hand are all you need to make your machine spic and span.

    Materials

    • white vinegar
    • baking soda
    • hydrogen peroxide (optional; use if you have mold)
    • rag
    • toothbrush

    Instructions for Cleaning a Front Loader

    (For top loaders see below.)

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, surface clean, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Step 1: Begin by wiping down the nooks and crannies outside the drum. Marnie is shown here using a rag dipped in a solution of 1 teaspoon of baking soda with 1/3 cup vinegar. Make sure you don't use anything abrasive on the glass or enamel as it can scratch. You can also soak any removable parts in a 2 to 1 water to vinegar solution.

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, unseen grime, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: Eeeeww! This is the grime we got from wiping the rubber seal around the glass.

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, cleaning hard to reach places, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: Most front loaders have a rubber gasket. Using a toothbrush, peel back these layers and really get into the hard-to-reach spots. (Note the little bits at the bottom of the photo. Yuck!) If this area has mold or mildew, use a rag or brush dipped in peroxide to kill it, and then wipe it away.

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, add baking soda, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Step 2: Once the outside is clean, tackle the inside. As an odor and soap scum fighter, add 1/3 cup baking soda to the drum.

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, add vinegar, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Step 3: Depending on the size of your model, fill the liquid detergent dispenser with 1 or 2 cups of vinegar. The acid in the vinegar will help break down any hard water and soap scum and will disinfect the machine.

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, sanitize 2, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Step 4: Set your machine on the sanitize or hottest cycle, full-load setting, and run—without any clothes in it.

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, final detail, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: When you're done, check the interior of the machine and wipe away any particles that may have come loose during the cycle. For best results, repeat this thorough cleaning process every four to six weeks. 

    How to Clean A Washing Machine, final long, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: That's it. Now Marnie's machine is truly clean.

    Instruction for Cleaning a Top Loader 

    First fill your machine with with hot water (no clothes). Stop the cycle after it's full and add 3 cups vinegar and stir or agitate the machine. Then add 1/2 cup baking soda, stir, and let sit one hour before you continue the cycle. While you're waiting, use the mixture inside the machine as your exterior cleaning solution. With a rag and toothbrush, wipe down the exterior and scour hard-to-reach areas. You can also soak any removable parts in this bath, while you clean the outside. When you're finished, close the lid and continue the wash cycle. 

    Other Tips for Keeping Your Washing Machine Squeaky Clean

    • When the machine is not in use, always leave the door open to ensure that the interior dries thoroughly.
    • Never leave damp clothes in the washer—transfer them immediately to the dryer.
    • Keep the top surfaces free of lint and detergent.
    • Remove lint from the dryer screen after every use.

    In the market for a washing machine? Here are 10 Front Loaders that we like. Go to Laundry & Utility Rooms for ideas, and take a look at Myles' $65 DIY Laundry Closet.

    For more green cleaning solutions, see 10 Ways to Use Vinegar in the Home.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015  

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    Karin Montgomery Spath of Auckland, New Zealand, is one of those designers whose name gets bestowed from one person to the next. We heard about her work from her son Matthew Williams (he's the Brooklyn-based photographer who shot all of the images in our book, Remodelista: A Manual for the Considered Home). Formerly a manufacturer of fashion textiles in Italy and Japan and founder of a bed linens company, Karin has an innate knack for pulling together rooms. Friends who admired her own house started asking her to reinvent their own quarters, and a new career was born. 

    Karin has designed projects in New Zealand and New York and a few points in between. While getting ready to overhaul a 1910s Auckland house, the owners, an ad exec and artist couple, had started looking for a place to decamp during the nine months of construction. "I suggested that I could make a loft apartment above the two-car garage for them to live in during the renovation, and that it wouldn't cost much more than a rental," says Karin. "They're busy people, so they told me to proceed and invite them to view it once finished." Here's what she unveiled.

    Photography by Matthew Williams

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: The studio is housed above a still-in-use two-car garage that Karin says was likely built in the 1970s, and was conveniently appointed with a peaked roof, finished walls, two windows, and two skylights. After securing building permits, Karin installed the loft floor, which is 32 square meters (approximately 344 square feet). A column-like wall in the center is fronted by the kitchen, and divides the bedroom from the living space. Note that the setup looks orderly because of its controlled palette: "It's so small that I felt a very simple, clean Scandinavian look would be the way to go," explains Karin.

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: Stairs made of recycled kauri, a New Zealand timber, lead to the apartment, where a small Artek Table and Stools, both Alvar Aalto classics, serve as "the dining area—if you pull out the table, it can seat four," says Karin. The pale floor is matai, another NZ wood. The space, including cabinetry, is painted "a soft, misty white" in a matte satin finish (Quarter Tea from New Zealand company Resene—see more in 5 Boutique Paint Companies from Down Under).

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: The custom-built kitchen is equipped with a Corian counter and "small but fully functional appliances," including a stainless steel sink with a faucet by Methven of New Zealand and an under-the-counter fridge by Fisher & Paykel (another NZ company) concealed behind a cabinet door. The white tiles are leftovers that the clients had held on to from a previous house. Storage cupboards on the wall next to the stove hold pantry goods and tableware. 

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: "A low futon bed was the obvious answer to cope with the lack of height by the wall under the pitched roof." Tolomeo Lamps provide adjustable bedside lighting. A full-size clothes closet stands at the foot of the bed (and adjacent to the kitchen). No crouching necessary in the space—the center of the room is about 13 feet tall.

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: The bathroom has a full-size shower lined with beige square tiles that Karin bought on sale from a tile shop for $1 NZD (about 88 cents) a square meter.

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: "There's no feeling of being petite," says Karin of the bathroom, which she appointed with a Duravit sink and toilet. The bathroom's skylight is part of the original garage. Under it, Karin inserted streamlined storage cupboards custom built from a compressed chipboard and hand painted: "I prefer hand-painting cupboards rather than spray painting—spraying gives a shine I am not happy with." 

    Garage Studio Apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: The custom painted-wood cupboards continue in the main room where they make masterful use of the low space along the perimeter (and are thoughtfully detailed with storage for suitcases; a cabinet even holds a pullout ironing board). They have reveal openings instead of hardware "to look like the walls, so that they disappear," says Karin. 

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: A pair of Artek Alvar Aalto 406 Armchairs with bentwood frames and webbing face a television tucked inside a cabinet. The lamp is the Italian Tzio Small Classic Table Lamp.

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: The designer, photographed by her son. "I am so surprised more people don't do this with roof space," she says."it's so easy and makes not just another bedroom but a whole living space."

    Garage studio apartment in NZ by Karin Montgomery Spath | Remodelista

    Above: The owners of the garage lived in the loft while their house was being remodeled, and it now serves as their guest quarters—"although they did say that they wondered why there were doing up a big house as the loft is all they really need," Karin says. She can be contacted at Karin Montgomery Spath

    For a similar project, see Backyard Bunkhouse, Hollywood Royal Family Edition. Also browse our archive of Storage & Organization and Small-Space Living posts, including 5 Favorites: Skinny Refrigerators and Little Giants: Compact Washers and Dryers.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

    This post is an update; it originally ran on February 3, 2014, as part of our Small-Space Living issue.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Friederike Deilius of Studio Berg, a recent graduate of the Berlin University of the Arts, is our kind of designer; interested in transforming the look and feel of everyday utilitarian household items. Case in point: her senior project, Foldwork, a brass folding drying rack. It's a prototype, but we hope it goes into production soon.

    Studio Berg Foldwork Drying Rack | Remodelista

    Above: "The initial idea was to transform disregarded functional products in our households and give them their own personality in order to get them out of the utility rooms into the central living areas," Friederike says.

    Framework Brass Rack by Studio Berg | Remodelista

    Above L: The Foldwork rack unfolded. Above R: A detail of the brass framework.

    Also see Drip Dry: 12 Kitchens with Wall-Mounted Dish Racks and 10 Easy Pieces: Countertop Dish Drainers.

     

     

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Andrew Glenn and Jonathan Rutherfurd Best are two Brits who, fed up with their careers in marketing and event management, escaped to Waiheke Island in New Zealand to open a boutique hotel.

    Glenn and Best enlisted the help of stylist and designer Katie Lockhart for the interiors and Special Group for graphics and branding. The result is the Oyster Inn, made up of just three guest rooms, a restaurant that seats 80, and a beach boutique. True to form, Lockhart's calm and minimalist interiors highlight some of our shared favorite designers, including furniture by Another Country and Falcon Enamelware in the guest rooms.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: The 80-seat restaurant offers veranda dining under the shade of surrounding palms, where worn metal chairs give a sense of the saltwater air of the island.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: Lockhart opted for cane seating in the main dining room with vintage Thonet Era Chairs and a few shelves displaying groupings of objects sourced from the sea: abalone shells, white coral, and seaweed.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: Era Barstools surround the bar where guests of the inn and wanderers from beyond can find sangria, lemonade, and a selection of wine chosen by sommelier Clare Dunleavy.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: A 20-seat private room called The Pearl is available for special events catered by chef Cristian Hossack (former head chef at London's Providores). True to its name, the Oyster Inn is the spot to find local Te Matuku oysters.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: Room One (of three) has a super king bed and a daybed from Another Country that can be converted to a child's bed.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: In the guest bath, white square tiles set into dark grout contrast with a large circular mirror and accompanying shaving mirror.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: Next to the apron sink, guests find white enamel Falcon tumblers and products from Aesop.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: Rattan ottomans and wicker furniture sit beneath a black barn pendant lamp and a wall-mounted Marlin.

    The Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lockhart, Remodelista

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: Graphics from Special Group add a whimsical note.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: The Shop at the inn is stocked with clothing and accessories for the beachgoer, including shirts from New York's Saturdays Surf, white-and-yellow Havaianas sandals exclusive to the inn.

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Oyster Inn in New Zealand, Designed by Katie Lochkart, Remodelista

    Above: The Oyster Inn on Waiheke Island is located just 40 minutes from Auckland by ferry. 

    For more of Lockhart's work, see our post on her shop, Everyday Needs. On the hunt for more antipodean design? Find our other favorite places to visit in New Zealand and Australia in our City Guide section.

    Enter the Remodelista Considered Design Awards 2015

    This post is an update; the original ran on April 22, 2013, as part of our Clean Sweep issue.

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    Learn how to create outdoor rooms with Michelle and the Gardenista crew this week—and consider entering your work in the just-launched Gardenista Considered Design Awards contest.

    Valerie Tran Lens Ass Architecten | Gardenista

    Above: Landscape on a Budget: 10 Quick Fixes to Add Personality to the Average Garden. Looking for shade? See DIY: Instant Painter's Drop Cloth Pergola.

    Peat pallets from This is Paper | Gardenista

    Above: 20 Under $20: Best Summer Garden Tools and Accessories.

    Enter the Gardenista Considered Design Awards content 2015

    Above: Gardenista's awards program is open to all readers—professional designers, home gardeners, and newbies alike. Get all the details here.

    Woodland garden in Massachusetts | Gardenista

    Above: Walk on the Wild Side: A New England Woodland Garden.

    Brass wall planters from Rowen and Wren | Gardenista

    Above: Brass Wall Planters from Rowen & Wren.

    Edible garden raised vegetable bed | Gardenista

    Above: Edible Garden: A Veg Weg on Legs.

    Garden ideas to steal from city gardens | Gardenista

    Above: Apartment Therapy: 11 Garden Ideas to Steal from New York City.

    Find a Landscape Design App for Home Gardeners, and more at Gardenista.

      For outdoor living design news, tips, and trends, sign up for the daily Gardenista newsletter

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    Read on to find out what grabbed our attention this week. 

    stadshem Johannesburg Apartment for Rent | Remodelista

    • Above: We're headed into a week of Scandinavian Blues. First stop: An apartment for rent in Gothenburg, Sweden, wallpaper included. Photograph by Jonas Berg. 
    • New York City's cheapest and most expensive neighborhoods. 
    • A guide to the American road trip

    Workstead Orbit Sconce | Remodelista

    Trulli Resort in Italy, Style Files | Remodelista

    DIY Rope Pillow from Martha Stewart | Remodelista

    • Above: Weekend project: Rope pillows for an outdoor space upgrade. 
    • We'll take two of these for a picnic at the beach. 

    Instagram and Pinterest Pick of the Week

    Remodelista Instagram Pick of the Week: @pholondon

    • Above: File this under: We need a Pho London (@pholondon) in the US. 

    Remodelista Pinterest Pick of the Week: Fine Life Co

    • Above: We're following Tuscan, Arizona's Fine Life Co., an online shop dedicated to independent designers and makers. 

    For more Remodelista, see our Summer Refresh issue. And don't miss Gardenista's week of DIY Landscaping

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    I'm a professional browser and if you ask me, Stockholm is the best shopping city in Europe. Why? Chock it up to notable fashion brands that have their roots in Sweden (among them, Acne, Hope, and &Other Stories) and a slew of inspired interiors shops. And they're located in some of Stockholm's most interesting historic buildings. Here are five spots where old mingles with edgy.

    A Customs House-Turned-Photography Museum

    Fotografiska in Stockholm | Remodelista

    Above: Every time I'm in Stockholm, I have to see what's on at Fotografiska, one of the leading photography museums in Europe. Located in a vast brick structure that once was a customs house, it's worth visiting for the building alone, not to mention its views over Stockholm. Photograph via Standing Ovation.

    A Hotel in a Former School for Girls 

    Miss Clara Hotel in Stockholm| Remodelista

    Above: The Miss Clara Hotel was once a school for girls, and Miss Clara was the principal. The Art Nouveau building's original steel staircase is preserved, and one of the suites was once a room where students went to pray. The rooms are decorated with elegant restraint—the conversion is the work of Swedish architect Gert Wingårdh—bentwood valets at the ends of the beds included. See more in our post Glamorous Comfort in Stockholm. Photograph via Miss Clara.

    Jeans for Sale in a Bank

    Acne Flagship Store | Remodelista

    Above: The Acne flagship store is housed in a former bank—a famous one: The Kreditbanken became known worldwide after a 1973 robbery in which the hostages developed a bond with their captors, hence the term Stockholm syndrome. While checking out the clothes, you get a firsthand look at the bank's big safe and steel bars. Photograph via Behance.

    A Garage-Turned-Vintage Shop

    Dusty Deco in Stockholm | Remodelista

    Above: Dusty Deco, a wonderful place for vintage Scandi modern finds, outgrew its original location in Stockholm's Sodermalm. The owners found the space they were after in a former garage in up-and-coming Hornstull. It's open on Saturdays and Sundays only and filled with not only great finds but charming room vignettes. Photograph via HD.

    A Restaurant in a Restored Electrical Building

    Restaurant Farang in Stockholm | Remodelista

    Above: The owners of Farang arrived in Stockholm last year after opening a trio of very good restaurants in Helsinki (Farang, Gajin, and Boulevard Social). Farang focuses on food from South East Asia and encourages guests to dine family style. The space is divided into a bar and a restaurant area, all located in an old electricity building. Photograph via Arch Daily.

    Our Weekend Guide columnist, Pauline Egge, is the founder and editor of the travel site Petite Passport. Pauline divides her time between the Netherlands and Spain, and spends much of the year crisscrossing the globe. She shares her favorite addresses with us city by city; have a look at some of her other guides:

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    The dreamy Scandi palette of sea and sky, fjord and stream has gotten even more interesting of late. This week we're taking a deep dive into the nuanced world of Nordic design right now.  

    Monday

    Frama Studio in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: Is battered and beautiful the look of things to come? In today's Architecture & Interiors post, Julie presents Copenhagen design studio Frama's atmospheric office/living quarters in a former pharmacy.

    Tuesday

    Camp Cots via Lonny | Remodelista

    Above: Looking for an instant daybed for summer? The simple canvas cot is being recruited for bigger things—watch for Tuesday's 5 Favorites. Photograph via Lonny.

    Wednesday

    Blue Wishbone Chairs | Remodelista

    Above: Thank you, Hans Wegner, for setting the standards for artful and enduring dining chairs. In 10 Easy Pieces, we present the high/low Scandi dining chair hall of fame.

    Thursday

    Karin Matz in Stockholm | Remodelista

    Above: We have our eye on Stockholm architect Karin Matz, who revived this time-warped apartment by "letting the previous layers and stories of the space live on." Explore the results in Thursday's Architect Visit.

    Friday

    Tiny Bedroom in Swedish Cottage I Remodelista

    Above: On Friday, our own in-house Swede, Izabella, leads us to the water and translates the Nordic way of seaside living. Watch for her 9 Ideas to Steal from Scandinavian Summer Houses.

    Modern Landscaping is the theme this week on Gardenista. Stay tuned for black box planters and gardening tips from Frida Kahlo.

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    Beyond Baltic birch: The home and studio/showroom of Frama director Niels Stroyer Christophersen merges artful decay with modernity. Christophersen describes his mission this way: "I want to create a dialog between two opposite poles, the classical and the contemporary." Working with a group of artists and designers, Frama produces a line of lighting and goods for the home and designs edgy commercial and residential spaces.

    The Frama studio, located in the historic Nyboder neighborhood, occupies a pharmacy dating back to the 1800s, original woodwork and architectural elements included. Christophersen's living quarters, a suite of rooms located off the studio, feature distressed walls and a selection of pieces from the studio's line of furniture and lighting. 

    Photographs via Frama unless otherwise noted.

    Frama Shop in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: The entryway to Christophersen's apartment is painted in St. Paul's Blue, a shade he developed for Danish paint company Jotun (as Em of Em's Design Blogg says, "Somehow it manages to be calm and dramatic at the same time; it looks like the sky when thunder rolls in"). Frama's 90 Degrees Floor Lamp provides illumination. 

    Frama St. Pauls Blue Color for Jotun | Remodelista

    Above: A view into the dining room.

    Frama Studio in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: Ghosts welcome—Christophersen originally planned to paint the apartment white, but reconsidered when he realized that the peeling paint added atmosphere. Photograph via Milk Decoration.

      Aja Otto Stoneware Studio Frama | Remodelista

    Above: Frama's Aja Otto Stoneware line is available with a black or white glaze.

      Studio Frama Kitchen in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: The flat's kitchen was the inspiration for Frama's kitchen line. Photograph by Ditte Isager and styling by Nathalie Schwer via Kinfolk.

    Frama Kitchen in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: A closeup of the cabinet detailing.

    Studio Frama Kitchen in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: A view of the kitchen with cobbled-together door. Photograph by Ditte Isager and styling by Nathalie Schwer via Kinfolk.

    Frama Studio in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: A countertop tableau. 

    Frama Studio in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: Christophersen's bedroom.

    Frama Studio in Copenhagen | Remodelista

    Above: The bath features Tara Tapware from Dornbracht.

    To see more of what's to come, take a look at our Top 15 Design Trends of 2015. And blue interiors fans, see Rhapsody in Blue: A Roundup of Our Favorite Color Posts.

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    Hung-Ming Chen and Chen-Yen Wei, founders of the Stockholm design studio Afteroom AB, are out to reinvent the wheel, or at least something like it. Their Q hook is a new twist on the S hook, longstanding storage staple of kitchen and closet, but not without its faults. "When you grab stuff from an S hook, the hook is often dislodged in the process," they point out. "With the addition of a loop, the S hook becomes a more stable storage solution."

    Afteroom Q Hook | Remodelista

    Above: The Q Hook will soon be available from NakNak Design.

    Afteroom Q Hook | Remodelista

    Above: The hook in action.

    Afteroom Q Hook | Remodelista

    Above: The Q Hook will be available in several finishes.

    Call us hook-obsessed:

    And take a look at Julia Childs' S-hook Pegboard Kitchen Organization (and the updated version here).

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    Time for a summer design refresh? An apartment update? A new set of bedding? ABC Carpet & Home's Annual Summer Sale runs from Sunday, June 14, to Sunday, July 19, 2015, with all furniture, rugs, lighting, bed linens, and bath on sale—in stores and online—at up to 60 percent off. And here's a deal sweetener: ABC is offering Remodelista readers the opportunity to win a $500 gift card to shop the sale online. 

    To enter, sign up for emails from ABC Carpet & Home and Remodelista by entering your email address by Sunday, June 21 in the box at the bottom of this post. 

    The winner, who will be notified by email by June 23, will be chosen at random and will receive an online gift code that can be used during the ABC Carpet & Home sale through July 19. See Official Rules for details and note that the gift card must be used by Sunday, July 19, 2015 (think: instant gratification). 

    Enter to Win $500 ABC Carpet & Home Summer Sale Gift Card | Remodelista

    Above: During the ABC Carpet & Home Annual Summer Sale, furniture will be discounted at up to 50 percent off, kitchen and tableware up to 30 percent off, and rugs up to 60 percent off.

    Enter to Win $500 ABC Carpet & Home Summer Sale Gift Card | Remodelista

    Above: Have your eyes on a dream rug from ABC Carpet & Home? All ABC rugs will be discounted at up to 60 percent off during the sale, so perhaps it's time to take the plunge. This 5-by-7-foot handwoven Textured Wool Rug will be on sale for $910 (down from $1,300). 

    Don't wait. Enter between now and June 21, 2015:

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    Star fashion stylist and shop owner Tiina Laakonen lives in the Hamptons surrounded by Finnish modern classics that remind her of home. In preparation for Midsummer Eve—this year the solstice is on June 20—she set her table with a spirited mix of patterns. Here's how to re-create the look.

    Table setting photographs by Heikki Aho for Remodelista.

    Tiina Laakonen's Midsummer table for Remodelista

    Above: Tiina sticks to a palette of black, white, and blue in every room, so we weren't surprised that she extends the scheme to her table. It also pervades Tiina the Store in Amagansett, New York, where she showcases fashion alongside Scandinavian household staples. (Tiina opened the boutique when she was furnishing her house and discovered a need to import so many of the Finnish designs she wanted to live with.)

    Tiina Laakonen's Midsummer table for Remodelista

    Above: The table is set with three different plate and napkin patterns: "By sticking to a simple color palette, you can mix patterns in a free way," she says. "The black and white Marimekko designs are all classics and most have a similar hand-drawn style. The blues add color and keep it all from looking too stark and cold." 

    Tiina Laakonen's Midsummer table for Remodelista

    Above: See A Finnish Design Fete: Tiina's Midsummer Table for Tiina's 10-course Midsummer menu.

    Tabletop

    Marimekko Yhdessa fabric from Tiina the Store | Remodelista

    Above: The tablecloth is Marimekko cotton yardage in the patchwork Yhdessä pattern; it's available at Tiina's shop for $48 per yard.

    Teema dinner from Iittala | Remodelista

    Above: Kaj Franck's Teema dinnerware, a classic from Finnish company Iittala, is available by the piece at Tiina the Store; Teema Dinner Plates are $26. Read the story behind the design and find other pieces and sources in Object Lessons.

    Paratiisa pattern from Arabia of Finland | Remodelista

    Above: The black-and-white plates are Birger Kaipiainen's 1970 Paratiisi pattern from Arabia of Finland (also available in a colored version). Paratiisi Dinner Plates are available from Rakuten Global Market for $51.63 each. Go to Arabia for more retailers.

    Lion pattern flatware by Hackman of Finland, a division of Iittala | Remodelista

    Above: Tiina's flatware is Bertel Gardberg's Lion Pattern by Hackman, a division of Iittala. A 24-piece set (six four-piece place settings) is $385 from the Finnish Design Shop.

    Iittala Valencia, a discontinued pattern available from vintage dealers | Remodelista

    Above: Iittala's cobalt-colored Valencia tableware was a wedding present to Tiina and her husband, Jon Rosen, from Tiina's family in Finland. Though production ceased in 2002, the pattern is available from vintage dealers, including Sataman Antiikki, Tiina's brother's antiques shop in Finland. It can also be sourced on Etsy and eBay.

    Tiina Hamptons House Blue Teema Glasses | Remodelista

    Above: Kaj Franck's Kartio colored glassware from Iittala is on display in Tiina's open kitchen. A set of two 7-ounce Kartio Tumblers is $22 from Tiina the Store and comes in several colors and other sizes. Didriks also sells the glassware. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista.

    Iittala Essence wine glass | Remodelista

    Above: Iittala's 2001 Essence wine glasses come in a range of shapes. The Essence White Wine Glass, shown here, is $40 for a set of two from Tiina the Store. All Modern also offers the collection.

    Iittala Kivi votives | Remodelista

    Above: Kivi Votives from Iittala are a 1964 design by Heikki Orvola; they're available in 10 shades of thick colored glass for $19 each from Amara.

    Suits napkins from Crate & Barrel | Remodelista

    Above: Linen Suits Napkins from Crate & Barrel are $39.95 for a set of four, each in a different stripe.

    Furniture

    Piet Hein Eek Scrapwood table from The Future Perfect | Remodelista

    Above: The biggest splurge in Tiina's open living room: her Piet Hein Eek table from the designer's scrapwood series. The 240 Canteen Table is $8,986 from The Future Perfect. (West Elm's Emmerson Reclaimed Wood Dining Table, $899-$1,200, was clearly inspired by the design.)

    Piet Hein Eek Scrapwood Canteen Bench | Remodelista

     

    Above: Piet Hein Eek's Canteen Bench in Scrapwood is $4,777 from The Future Perfect. (The Emmerson Reclaimed Wood Bench from West Elm is $499-$599.)

    O&G Studio Colt Lowback Side Chair | Remodelista

    Above: At the table, bench seating is paired with vintage Scandinavian dining chairs that Tiina's husband found on eBay. For a similar look, consider O&G Studio's ebonized ash Colt Low-Back Side Chair handmade in Rhode Island; $680 each.

    Tour Tiina's Hamptons compound in the opening chapter of the Remodelista book and Rhapsody in Blue: A Finnish Stylist at Home.

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    A summer essential: the canvas cot. Add a few pillows and throws and it becomes an instant daybed. Here are 10 we're admiring (plus sourcing details).

    Erin Boyle Canvas Cot | Remodelista

    Above: Gardenista contributor Erin Boyle of Reading My Tea Leaves (she's an expert on tiny apartment living) found her vintage army cot on eBay; it replaces a couch with a larger footprint and frees up valuable floor space. 

    OGK Safari Cot | Remodelista

    Above: Designed in 1962 by Ole Gjerlov-Knudsen for his son, who was embarking on a camping trip (Kundsen wanted him to travel in comfort), the OGK Safari Daybed is $620 from the Dwell Store. Photograph via French by Design.

    Topos Camp Bed | Remodelista

    Above: Athens-based Topos Workshop offers a Foldable Camp Bed; go to Topos to find a dealer.

    Camp Cots via Lonny | Remodelista

    Above: End-to-end camp cots in the Catskills home of Kiran and Stephane DiTullio create a long daybed. Photograph by Ball & Albanese via Lonny. For something similar, consider the Maine Heritage Cot from Byers; $99.

    Black Camp Cot | Remodelista

    Above: The OGK Safari Daybed is now available with a black-stained beech frame, black-dyed natural linen cover, and black-dyed sisal ropes via Goods We Love in NYC (it's newly available at The Line in NYC).

    Kara Roselund Cot Daybed | Remodelista

    Above: Australian stylist Kara Roselund tops a small vintage camp cot with slouchy pillows for an instant resting spot.

    Army Cots via WTF | Remodelista

    Above L: A camp cot as daybed in a photo by Stellen Herner via Desire to Inspire. Above R: An army cot via Bodie and Fou.

    Hedgehouse Throwbeds | Remodelista

    Above: LA outfit Hedgehouse makes down-filled covers for daybeds; go to Hedgehouse for more info.

    Marche St. Georges Cot | Remodelista

    Above: A vintage cot in a post called Places to Nap via Le Marche St. George

    Menu Daybed | Remodelista

    Above: Designed by Anita Johansen, the Menu Daybed is made of light oak with a felted wool cover (it's also available with a black-stained oak frame); $2,300 from Y Living.

    Can you tell we're mildly obsessed with cots? Further proof: 7 Classic Canvas Cots for Summer Slumber and High/Low Wood and Canvas Camp Cots.

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