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    Designer Arjan Lodder was inspired by German kitchen design when he started his company, Arjan Lodder Keukens, 20 years ago. He started small—Lodder's wife and brother were his first employees—but 25 people now design and manufacture Lodder kitchens in the middle of the Netherlands. Everything is custom made, from hardwood cabinets to hardware. According to Lodder, “We make kitchens and interiors for people with evolving taste; people with an eye for quality. This may sound arrogant, but I don’t mean it that way. Our customer sees our work and appreciates the craft.”

    Photography by Hendrick Biegs

    Lodder Keukens Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: This kitchen—called Amsterdam—is one of Lodder's newest, finished in the spring of this year. In his very first kitchen, Lodder had painted the cabinets in pale yellow. It was a fortuitous choice: the kitchen was published in several design magazines and Lodder's business took off. 

    Lodder Keukens Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: Many Lodder kitchens make use of full-height interior windows and doors.

    Arjan Lodder describes the aesthetic of his kitchens as "sober luxury." The company partners with high-end appliance manufacturers like Viking, Siemens, and Gaggenau. Arjan Lodder himself is mostly interested in color and loves to create new mixes—his most recent being a dark blue/black.

    Lodder Keukens Kitchen in the Netherlands | Remodelista

    Above: The Amsterdam kitchen is at the heart of the home, lofted above the main living space. 

    Lodder Keukens Kitchen in the Netherlands | Remodelista

    Above: Almost everything in the kitchen is cleanly tucked away in stainless steel cabinets. An open cart on the concrete floor displays handmade pottery worth keeping on view. 

    Lodder Keukens Kitchen in the Netherlands | Remodelista

    Above: Lodder calls the Amsterdam kitchen "a beautiful mix of traditional and sleek."

    Lodder Keukens Kitchen in the Netherlands | Remodelista

    Above: Framed by hand-cut tiles, there's just enough open shelving to keep the pretty things on display.

    Arjan Lodder notes that a refined eye can develop over time: “Our oldest mechanic has worked for us for 19 years. In the beginning, he once said of—in my opinion—a very dowdy kitchen: Stunning! Now he has a developed eye and it’s nice to see how he uses it in his own house.”

    Lodder Keukens Kitchen in the Netherlands | Remodelista

    Above: The company recently added "Interiors" to its name and expanded production to include doors, furniture, and closets. Says Arjan Lodder, "It's nice if you can see the same materials used throughout your home." 

    Keep exploring kitchens around the world. See:

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Here's an oven that mixes state-of-the-art technology with a stripped-down appearance, wood handle included. Called the Amica Zen, it takes inspiration from Zen teachings that focus on leading daily life mindfully. A design for people who aspire to maintain calm in their kitchen—could this be the start of a new trend? 

    Amica Black Zen Oven, Remodelista

    Above: Winner of the 2012 Red Dot Best of the Best design award, the Amica Zen Multifunction Oven is faced with glass.

    Amica White Zen Oven, Remodelista

    Above: Offered in white or black, the design is made by longstanding European appliance company Amica of Wronki, in Poland, and currently available only in Europe and the UK. It retails for £399 ($625.53). See Amica for store locations. 

    Amica Zen Oven With Wood Handle | Remodelista

    Above: One of the most appealing details is the round wood handle, which comes in a choice of birch, ebony, or oak.

    Behind the stove's simplicity is advanced technology. It purports to cut energy consumption by 20 percent, features rapid preheating, and earned an energy-efficiency rating of A. 

    Amica Black Zen Oven, Remodelista

    Above: What the Zen Multifunction Oven leaves behind are the complex controls: No alarms, timers, ringtones, or illumination to assault the senses (but you may need to break out an old-fashioned egg timer).

    Amica Zen White Multifunction Oven, Remodelista

    Above: The two control knobs pop out for use and push in to create a flush surface.

    Amica White Zen Oven in white kitchen, Remodelista

    Above: The Amica Zen Multifunction Oven in white integrates well in a white kitchen.

    Debating over whether to install a range or a cooktop-oven combo? Read Remodeling 101: Range vs. Cooktop, Pros and Cons. Short on cooking time? Consider whether a Speed Oven is for you.

    See all our Kitchen Ranges posts for more.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Who: Heidi Swanson of 101 Cookbooks fame launched her online store, Quitokeeto, with her partner Wayne Bremser, not long ago, offering a tightly edited collection of culinary goods.

    What: Kitchen finds, unique culinary offerings, and other things (like naturally produced perfumes) that catch their attention on their global travels.

    Insider Scoop: So far the Remodelista Market is the only place where Quitokeeto sells directly to the public. Come by on Saturday and check out the goods.

     Quitokeeto studio apron | Remodelista

    Above: Heidi collaborated with Remodelista Market favorite, Matt Dick of Small Trade Company, to create these Mason Studio Aprons. Sporting a low tie and roomy pockets, the apron is made from Japanese cotton twill for $120.

    Quitokeeto olive blossom honey | Remodelista

    Above: Olive Blossom Honey, a Northern Californian polyfloral honey harvested from a single unsprayed olive orchard, is $58. 

    Quitokeeto California sea salt | Remodelista

    Above: California Sea Salt, a rare find from the California coast, is $11.

    Quitokeeto aga casserole Remodeista

    Above: British company AGA is most noted for their ranges but these creamy off white Cast Iron Casseroles are equally noteworthy; $315 for a large size.

    Quitokeeto big sur bakery stollen | Remodelista

    Above: Anyone who has been to the Big Sur Bakery can attest to their delectable baked goods. I scored one of their Stollens last year and it was an immediate crowd pleaser. Get on the list for the next Quitokeeto delivery: Big Sur Bakery Stollen for $30.

    Both Sarah and Ambatalia will be at this Saturday's Market selling their goods, along with Heidi.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    "Drink well" is the motto at Super Whatnot, a popular watering hole in Brisbane, Australia, set in a former loading dock and storage area. The establishment fronts a fully operational service alley and takes its aesthetic cues straight from the street. Come slip in for an inspiring lesson in using what you've got. 

    Photography by Alicia Taylor

    Piviot-wheel-steel window and black leather sofas in Super Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: Super Whatnot owner, entrepreneur Simon Martin, came to architect Angus Munro of Brisbane's Marc & Co with a shoestring budget and asked him to keep the space largely as found. Munro complied by retaining and reusing existing finishes. And the new materials that he introduced are either salvaged or left raw. An example is the pivot-wheel window, shown here. Fabricated from unfinished, recycled steel, it fronts the bar's entry lounge.

     Exposed brick walls, reclaimed wood floors, three-legged stools, black leather banquette seating inSuper Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: When the steel door is in its open position, the lounge becomes an extension of the street.

    Black leather banquette seating, hanging greenery in front of white wall inSuper Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: Built-in banquette seating wraps around the sunken bar area. Hanging greenery softens the industrial look.

    Exposed brick walls, reclaimed wood floors, three-legged stools, black leather banquette seating inSuper Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: Three-legged stools do double duty as side tables and additional seating.

     Two rows of large cylindrical pendants hang above penny-round white tile fronted bar with stainless steel countertop in room with wood floors and exposed brick walls in Super Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: White penny-round tiles face the bar, creating a fresh and interesting contrast to the existing brick walls. In 5 Favorites: Penny-Round Tile Backsplashes, we show the appeal penny tile can have in the kitchen. 

    Gray aprons hang on natural wood finish Muuto circular coat hooks with exposed brick wall background inSuper Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: Bartenders' aprons hang on Muuto Coatrack Dots of different sizes. See what else this versatile hook can do in 5 Favorites: Muuto Dot Hangers Used in Unexpected Ways.

    View of sunken lounge with black leather banquette seating and wood panelled mezzanine above,Super Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: There are three levels: The sunken lounge and mezzanine area are shown here. The bar is situated behind this view.

    Wood panelled wall with horizontal stips and outdoor furniture in mezzanine of Super Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: Reclaimed wood panels, outdoor furniture, and potted plants lend an outdoor-deck vibe to the mezzanine.

    Tiled small black hexagonal tiled bathroom wall and concrete sink in Super Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: Tiling walls with black hexagonal tiles is a low-cost way to achieve a durable surface with a high visual impact. In Tile & Countertop: Basic Black Mosaic Tiles, we explore the LBD (Little Black Dress) of the bathroom.

    Rough-hewed rope covered columns and embossed raw steel panel as exterior of Super Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: On the outside, columns are wrapped in rough-hewn rope and the Super Whatnot logo is subtly branded on the raw steel plating.

    Rough-hewed rope covered columns and embossed raw steel panel as exterior of Super Whatnot in Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: Super Whatnot fronts a laneway (Aussie for "alley") and the exterior is a visual essay in urban camouflage.

    Super Whatnot letter press business card with blue and red ink in  Brisbane Australia, Marc and Co, Alicia Taylor | Remodelista

    Above: The bar is at 48 Burnett Lane in the middle of Brisbane's emerging city center (see map below).

    If you're planning a trip to Australia—where it's high summer now—have a look at our Australia City Guides for our favorite design haunts Down Under. And, on Gardenista, visit what might be the Greenest Coffee Shop in the World.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Thanks to Workshop Residence, a San Francisco organization that pairs visiting artists with local manufacturers, sculptor Gay Outlaw and woodworker Bob Schmitz undertook a foundry project in a material that was new to both: cast iron. Their long journey resulted in a Dutch oven that blurs the line between art and utility. It's at the top of all our wish lists. 

    Outlaw Schmitz Dutch Oven, Remodelista

    Above: Outlaw Schmitz Cast-Iron Dutch Ovens are available with a rounded or squared bottom and lid. They each hold three quarts and are $180 each, or $340 for the pair, at Workshop. (N.B. The duo are taking orders for their second batch, which is expected to be ready on December 17, with more to follow.)

    Outlaw Schmitz Dutch Oven Rounded Bottom, Remodelista

    Above: The cast-iron lids have a wood-grain pattern. 

    Outlaw Schmitz Cast Iron Dutch Oven, Remodelista

    Above: Each Dutch oven comes lightly oiled with canola oil and requires preseasoning, by being heated in a oven for three hours before use. 

    Outlaw Schmitz Dutch Oven In Process, Remodelista

    Above: The pots are cast in sand in small batches at AB&I Foundry in Oakland, California, and are made of 99 percent recycled iron.

    Outlaw Schmitz Dutch Oven, Remodelista

    Above: The bottom of the Outlaw Schmitz Dutch Oven proudly states its roots.

    For more products designed by Workshop Residence artists, go to the Workshop Online Store. Live in the Bay Area? Visit Workshop at 833 22nd St., in the Dog Patch neighborhood.

    Cast-iron cookware is having a renaissance. See:

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Michelle and team have been busy getting ready for Saturday's Remodelista Holiday Market in SF (with a Gardenista section and workshop). Take a look at their perfect-for-right-now DIY ideas, exotic drinks included.

    Amaryllis bulbs from Terrain | Gardenista

    Above: At the market, Michelle will be leading a Terrain-sponsored workshop devoted to Scandi-style holiday displays using bulbs and moss. Go to DIY Holiday Workshop for details and to reserve a spot.

    Candes at A New Leaf in Chicago | Gardenista

    Above: Tour Chicago's New Leaf in this week's Shopper's Diary, a flower shop set up for browsing. Make a beeline for the basement to find vases, ribbons, and candles in every color.

    Justine Hand's foraged holiday arrangements | Gardenista

    Above: In DIY Holiday Decor, Justine creates simple arrangements from ingredients gathered in her own backyard and enhances them with a touch of gold and silver paint.

    Bourbon and scotch shrub | Gardenista

    Above: The elixir that Martha and George Washington swore by, the vinegar-based shrub is making a comeback. In An Old-Fashioned Drink for Modern Times, learn about a new book of shrub recipes, plus how mix a shrub-improved Old-Fashioned.

    DIY foraged tree star by Justine Hand for Gardenista

    Above: Why buy what you can make? In A Star Is Born, Justine fills us in on how to fashion the perfect tree topper. And stay tuned for more of her God's-eye ornaments next week on Remodelista. 

    From World's Most Beautiful Potting Sheds | Gardenista

    Above: Are you wishing for a potting shed as your big present this year? For inspiration, see 10 Stylish Sanctuaries for Gardeners.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    A roundup of interiors books that we've covered this year, plus a few newly released titles.

    Commune Design Book | Remodelista

    Above: Commune: Designed in California; $42.45 from Amazon. From LA's arbiters of eclectic cool, Commune's first book features a look at the firm's projects, ranging from the American Trade Hotel in Panama City to a Japanese modernist farmhouse in LA.

    A Frame for Life by Ilse Crawford | Remodelista

    Above: A Frame for Life: The Designs of Studioilse by Ilse Crawford; $39.70 from Amazon.

    Plain Simple Useful by Conran | Remodelista

    Above: Plain Simple Useful: The Essence of Conran Style by Terence Conran; $25.81 from Amazon.

    Collected by Fritz Karch and Rebecca Robertson | Remodelista

    Above: Collected: Living with the Things You Love by Fritz Karch and Rebecca Robertson; $27.02 from Amazon. See Margot's review here.

      Artisanal Home by Casamidy | Remodelista

    Above: The Artisanal Home: Interiors and Furniture of Casamidy; $38.86 from Amazon. We're longtime fans of Casamidy, the design/furniture studio founded by husband/wife team Jorge Almada and Anne-Marie Midy; see their San Miguel de Allende house here, their Paris flats here and here, their Brussels shop here, and browse their products here.

    The Inspired Home: Nests of Creatives | Remodelista

    Above: The Inspired Home: Nests of Creatives, by Kim Ficaro and Todd Nickey; $37.05 from Amazon. See Sarah's review here.

    The Stuff of Life by Hilary Robertson | Remodelista

    Above: The Stuff of Life by Hilary Robertson; $24.86 from Amazon. See Sarah's review here.

    Vintage Industrial Book from Rizzoli | Remodelista

    Above: Vintage Industrial by Misha de Potestad and photographer Patrice Pascal; $32.14 from Amazon. See Meredith's review here.

    Modern Original by Leslie Williamson | Remodelista

    Above: Modern Originals: At Home with Midcentury European Designers by Leslie Williamson; $34.12 from Amazon. See Sarah's review here.

    Cape Cod Modern Book | Remodelista

    Above: Cape Cod Modern: Midcentury Architecture and Community on the Outer Cape, by Peter McMahon and Christine Cipriani; $33.34 from Amazon. See Julie's review here.

    Beautifully Small by Sara Emslie | Remodelista

    Above: Beautifully Small: Clever Ideas for Compact Spaces, by Sara Emslie; $22.18 from Amazon. See Christine's review here.

    The Furniture Bible | Remodelista

    Above: The Furniture Bible: Everything You Need to Know to Identify, Restore, and Care for Furniture by Christophe Pourny. The dashing Frenchman learned the art of furniture restoration in his father's atelier in the South of France. His book is a comprehensive guide to furniture care (how to clean leather, polish hardware, fix a broken leg); $23.37 from Amazon.

    See Gardenista's Required Reading selections for the horticulturalist and cook, including the Gardener's Garden book and Shrubs: An Old-Fashioned Drink for Modern Times.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Who: For those of you—make that us—who love under-the-radar fashion, Rene Friedrich of Bay Area–based online store Anaïse has been quietly gathering a band of devotees.

    What: Cult fashion mixed with jewelry and lifestyle goods that feature hard-to-find, under-the-radar brands. 

    Insider Scoop: Anaïse will be featuring goods from two Remodelista favorites: tableware from French ceramicist Cécile Daladier and boiled wool runners from A Détacher in NYC.

    Anaise Siri Siri Kiriko Ring and Sylvain le Hen ponytail barrette | Remodelista

    Above L: A Siri Siri Kiriko Ring made of sculpted glass; $439. Above R: A Sylvain Le Hen Ponytail Barrette in silver; $64.

    Anaise Maison de Vacances  Vice Versa throw and Auntie Oti quilted throw | Remodelista

    Above L: Maison de Vacances Vice Versa Throw of washed linen made in France; $294. Above R: Auntie Oti Quilted Throw from India; $436.

    Anaise Eatable of Many Orders Tin Bag and Jasmin Shokrian canvas compass bag | Remodelista

    Above L: Tin Bag of leather and wood, crafted by hand in Japan, from Eatable of Many Orders; $345. Above R: Jasmin Shokrian's Canvas Compass Bag; $298.

    Anaise Reinhard Plank Laila hat and The gentlewoman magazine | Remodelista

    Above L: Reinhard Plank's felted wool Laila Hat, made in Italy. Above R: The Gentlewoman Magazine; $14.99.

    Join us tomorrow at the Remodelista Holiday Market in San Francisco 2014. And for more, see:

    Not familiar with La Garçonne or Totokaelo? Read about them here:

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Today we're in San Francisco for the annual Remodelista Holiday Market at Heath Ceramics. Join us from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free and there's street parking.

    Heath Ceramics Holiday Event | Remodelista

    • Above: While you're at Heath Ceramics for today's market, don't miss the Design Series exhibit. A year in the making, the show features artists' interpretations of Heath's classic multi-stem bud vase.
    • A Christmas tree stand for the minimalist. 
    • Holiday lights that are kind to Mother Nature.  

    Elle Decoration Christmas, Photographed by Petra Bendel | Remodelista

    Rosewater Shortbread via 101cookbooks/Heidi Swanson | Remodelista

    • Above: Add this recipe for rosewater shortbread to your holiday party menu. Photograph by Heidi Swanson. 
    • Drape your Christmas tree in DIY copper stars
    • A truly contemporary take on the classic wreath

    Jenni Kayne Christmas Decor | Remodelista

    • Above: The definition of holiday chic: Jenni Kayne's recent lunch with The Chalkboard Mag. Photograph courtesy of Rip + Tan. 
    • Could movie theaters be more comfortable? Ikea thinks so. 
    • How to make good gift baskets.

    Instagram and Pinterest Picks of the Week

    Remodelista Instagram Pick of the Week: @wearetriibe

    • Above: Our latest Instagram obsession is We Are Triibe (@wearetriibe), a full-service interior and design studio. 
    • Jolly holly: Have a look at event stylist Tanisha Sczebel's Holiday board on Pinterest. 

    Seeking objects and projects that are as beautiful as they are practical? Take a look at our Utilitarian Glamour issue, and don't miss Gardenista's week of Utilitarian Glamour

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    This weekend Hugh Randolph, founding principal of Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects and a member of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory, talks to us about his renovation of a historic house in Austin, Texas. He will be available for the next 48 hours to answer any and all questions about his less-than-straightforward design solutions. Ask away!

    The Scenario: Seeking a lifestyle change, a creative Austin couple (he’s an inventor in the high-tech industry, she works in arts education) and their two teenage daughters trade their 4,800-square-foot home far from town for an 1,800-square-foot, one-story Greek Revival cottage in historic West Austin.

    The Challenge: The family aspire to what they term "less space, less waste" living, and yet their new place needs to be considerably rethought and enlarged to work for them. Architect Hugh Randolph has to find a way of adding another 1,000 square feet while maintaining the traditional character of the house and keeping its surrounding garden as large as possible.

    The Solution: Randolph can't extend, so he builds up. With some clever roof manipulation, he fits an entire teen suite (two bedrooms and a shared loft) into the eaves of what had been attic space. Meanwhile, he reworks the main floor so extensively that only one living room wall and the chimney and fireplace are in their original locations. 

    The Result: A light-filled modern house set in a traditional-looking cottage.

    Randolph’s Top Tips
    • Think on your feet and be open to design modifications during construction. Many of the features of this house evolved as we uncovered and improved while it was being built. 
    • Be brave and move walls or other existing features that no longer make sense.
    • New build does not have to look new—much of what we built has been mistaken for being part of the original house.

    Any questions? Ask away!

    Photography by Whit Preston, unless otherwise noted.

     Exterior of white 1935 Greek Revival house with green door, modern dormers and standing seam metal roof in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograph by Whit Preston | Remodelista

    Above: Randolph raised the roofline of the house by three feet, but from the street, the 1935 Greek Revival Cottage looks almost untouched. Three modern dormers that bring light into the shared common space of the teen suite are the only hint of change.

    Living roof of Palma Residence in Austin Texas with reclaimed wood ship lap siding by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograpy by Whit Preston | Remodelista

    Above: In the living room at the front of the house, one wall and the chimney and fireplace are the only architectural elements that remain in their original locations post-renovation. The wood shiplap siding is reclaimed from the interior walls of the house and the fireplace surround is plaster with a steel trim.

    Dark wood stairs with white rail and brick chimney, Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograpy by Casey Dunn | Remodelista

    Above: A new stair connects the ground floor to the upper bedrooms and loft. "The chimney is the visual anchor of the back of the house and its modern appearance is a contrast to the more traditional front room of the house," Randolph says. "We exposed the brick to reveal the history of the existing chimney and its construction." In the spirit of maximizing space, Randolph also managed to fit an office and closet underneath the stairs (see below). Ebony-stained oak was used on the stairs and floors. Photograph by Casey Dunn.

    Black and white modern kitchen of Palma Residence in Austin Texas with soapstone carrara marble countertops by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograpy by Whit Preston | Remodelista

    Above: Situated in the back of the house, the kitchen has modern windows that extend straight to the ceiling. A soapstone countertop contrasts with the Carrara marble used on the island. The building beyond is a garage now used as a workshop. 

    Black and white ktichen with soapstone and carrara marble countertops in Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograph by Casey Dunn| Remodelista

    Above: The stove wall backsplash is wallpaper depicting a black-and-white crowd scene; it's protected with a glass panel. The hood was custom made of MDF and painted to match the cabinets. Photograph by Casey Dunn.

    White molded plastic Eames chairs, vintage red chairs and black upholstered bench around rectantular wood dining table in Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photography by Casey Dunn | Remodelista

    Above: The dining area at the front of the house has a more traditional look, enhanced by a newly added exposed wood ceiling. Photograph by Casey Dunn.

    Storage underneath dark wood stairs with white rail and brick chimney, Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograpy by Whit Preston | Remodelista

    Above: "We evolved the design during construction to change from an open stair rail to the solid white panels we now have," Randolph says. "This allowed the storage closet door to be more fully integrated and also helped to make the stair more of a sculptural object."

    Desk and shelves underneath stairs in Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograpy by Whit Preston | Remodelista

    Above: The space under the stair is near the kitchen and an active area of the house. "It made sense for this to be the wife's desk area because she wanted to be near the rest of the family," Randolph says. "She has an amazing, eclectic sense of style and was the lead on the interior design decisions." The office dimensions are approximately 3 feet, 8 inches by 6 feet; the ceiling height goes from 5 feet, 10 inches at its lowest up to 8 feet.

    Half-glazed French doors and hall paneled with reclaimed wood ship lap in stair hall of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograph by Case Dunn | Remodelista

    Above: Vintage, half-glazed doors bring light from the stair hall, sheathed in shiplap siding, into the hall of the master bedroom suite. Photograph by Casey Dunn.

    Bathroom of Palma residence in Austin Texas with subway tiles on walls, patterned blue and white tiles on floor and double vanity,  by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograph by Whit Preston | Remodelista

    Above: Like the kitchen, the windows in the master bath run up to the ceiling. 

    Subway tiles and double vanity in Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograph by Casey Dunn | Remodelista

    Above: Randolph designed the custom vanity, and his client selected the subway tiles on the walls and the patterned tiles on the floor. Photograph by Casey Dunn. 

    Vintage wood headboard with pink orange bedside table in Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograph by Case Dunn | Remodelista

    Above: The headboard in the master bedroom ties into the shiplap paneling that appears throughout the house. Photograph by Casey Dunn.

    Two dark green velvet covered chairs on an yellow area rug contrasted with dark wood Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograph by Casey Dunn | Remodelista

    Above: The master bedroom is at the front of the house, which retains its original window proportions. A sitting area with twin club chairs makes good use of the light. Photograph by Casey Dunn.

    Detail of Chimney in Palma Residence in Austin, Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograpy by Patrick Wong | Remodelista

    Above: "The changing brick textures of the chimney act as a record of the changes that have been made to the house," says Randolph. "By preserving the old white paint on the upper portion of the chimney that previously went through the roof, we were showing another evolution of the old and new." Photograph by Patrick Wong. 

    Interior dormer detail, wood ship lap on slope of ceiling Detail of Chimney in Palma Residence in Austin, Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograpy by Patrick Wong | Remodelista

    Above: The new modern dormers on the front of the house bring shafts of light into the shared loft in the teen suite. Photograph by Patrick Wong. 

    Family sitting on front steps of  white 1935 Greek Revival house with green door, modern dormers and standing seam metal roof in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects, Photograph by Casey Dunn | Remodelista

    Above: Three of the four family members and their pets enjoy the front porch. The new standing seam metal roof has a paint-grip galvanized finish. In Hardscaping 101: Standing Seam Metal Roofs, learn about this option that's a favorite of architects. Photograph by Casey Dunn.

    Modern Rear elevation of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson  Randolph Architects, Photograpy by Whit Preston | Remodelista

    Above: In the back, the kitchen and one of the second-story bedrooms are stacked to form a double-height modern box within the existing footprint of the house.

    Above: A single-story block that holds the master bathroom is the only new build that breaks out of the existing footprint of the house. Randolph created vertical baffles made of square aluminum tubes and placed them on the new modern sections of the house. "We wanted to refer to the rhythm of the old horizontal siding without matching it," Randolph says. "Like the old siding, the baffles cast shadows on the walls and create visual interest and change throughout the day."

    Ground floor plan of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The ground-floor plan. The blue walls indicate new construction.

    Second story floor plan of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The floor plan of the upper level showing the teen suite with its two bedrooms and shared loft space at the front. 

    Section drawing of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: A diagram illustrates how Randolph found extra headroom in the attic by raising the roof in the front and creating flat roofs in the back.

    Section rendering of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The chimney becomes a dividing line in the house between the traditional and the modern.

    Before

    Before exterior image of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The house as it appeared when it was first purchased.

    Before attic space image of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The attic space into which Randolph fit two bedrooms and a shared loft.

    Before kitchen image of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: A 1980s image of the kitchen.

    Before living room image of Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: A view of the original living room paneled with shiplap siding.

    During construction image of two men installing wood paneling, Palma Residence in Austin Texas by Hugh Jefferson Randolph Architects | Remodelista

    Above: Installing the reclaimed shiplap siding during the renovation.

    N.B. All Before images are from Keeping the Pease, a blog the husband wrote to document the renovation.

    Hugh Randolph shares addidtional thoughts on the project in this video.

    Interested in more Austin-style design? See:

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    We're counting the minutes to the holidays, and devoting this week to decorating and festooning—with ease (and time to kick back and start catching up with family and friends along the way). Watch for inspirational interiors, simple DIY projects—including a pine-tasseled table setting by star event designer David Stark—and plenty of present ideas.

    Remodelista Table of Contents Holiday 101 December 2014

    Above: Photograph by Alexa Hotz from DIY: The Sawhorse Holiday Table for Less than $100. If you're expecting guests and in need of a dining table, Alexa has the answer.

    Monday

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Double Copper Sink,  Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: What does a chef at a Michelin-starred restaurant's own cooking setup at home look like? In today's Architecture & Interiors post, we're presenting the British Standard kitchen where you can find Skye Gyngell when she's not presiding over London's most beautiful new restaurant. 

    Tuesday

      Steel Menorah from March SF

    Above: For the first day of Hanukkah, we've gathered 5 Favorites: modern menorahs (some of which can put in appearances year round). This solid brass example comes with a matching brass tray.

    Wednesday

    New York star party planner David Stark's DIY place setting, pine needle tassels in progress | Remodelista

    Above: You'll have to wait until Wednesday to see David Stark's DIY Project, but here's a detail. Cost for the accompanying cotton napkins: about $2 each. Photograph by Corrie Hogg of David Stark Design.

    Thursday

      At home in Sonora, Mexico with the couple behind furniture and design firm Casamidy | Remodelista

    Above: On Thursday, Margot pays a House Call to Sonora, Mexico—where it snows, on occasion—to visit the ranch built by the Jorge Almada and Marie-Anne Midy, the couple behind design studio Casamidy. For an inkling of their capabilities, take a look at their San Miguel Homebase and their Waxed Canvas and Leather Furniture.

    Friday

    DIY foraged tree star by Justine Hand for Gardenista

    Above: Justine has been busy with string and twigs. We're unveiling her Scandi-inspired ornaments as Friday's DIY Project. Make sure you're got plenty of string on hand.

    The festivities continue: For Holiday Decor, Curb Appeal, Fresh Recipes, and more, head over to Gardenista. 

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    We're admiring the current crop of menorahs that are not only modern in form, but add a note of glamour, too. In time for the first day of Hanukkah (this year, it's December 16), here are five favorites:

    Steel Menorah from March SF  

    Above: From San Francisco kitchen emporium March, the MARCH Brass Menorah consists of nine individual candle holders and a matching tray (not shown) made from high polished brass, $2,500. The design is also available in Patinated Steel in a black or shiny silver finish with a tray, $2,000.

      Ascalon Menorah Carrara marble

    Above: The Ascalon Menorah with Candles is made from solid Carrara marble and has eight candleholders to correspond with the eight days of Hanukkah and one shamash (the candle used to light the others) on a different level. Left and right diagonals in the design create an 18-degree angle, which designer Brad Ascalon points out references the fact that in Judaism, the number 18 symbolizes chai or life. Available from Design Within Reach, it's currently on sale for $233.75 (regular price: $275), and includes 45 hand-dipped, 6-inch white candles.

    Modern Menorah by Marmol Radziner | Remodelista  

    Above: The Menorah from architects Marmol Radziner is handmade in Los Angeles from walnut and bronze; $140 (it's also available from the Dwell Store). 

    Fort-standard-marble-candle-holders

    Above: Make your own menorah using Fort Standard's simple geometric Marble Candleholders that can be easily stacked to create candles of different heights. They're available in black or white circles, pentagrams, and hexagrams and have a leather bottom that keeps them from scratching tabletops; $42 each. 

    Lindsay Adelman Nick and the Candlestick

    Above: The Nick and the Candlestick by Lindsey Adelman was inspired by antique brass weights and named after a Sylvia Plath poem. It has nine brass holders at varying heights that rest on a walnut tray; candles are inserted onto spikes, so they appear to float. The design is available from Matter for $1,905.

    For a more traditional looking menorah, check out a perennial favorite: Josh Owen's Menorah for Areaware.

    This post is an update; it originally appeared in November 2013 as part of our Giving Thanks issue.

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    Last month London-based chef Skye Gyngell opened her highly anticipated restaurant Spring to instant acclaim (we dropped in a couple of weeks ago for lunch and were smitten by the food and the decor).

    So what does the former head chef of Petersham Nurseries (where she earned a Michelin star) and previous food editor at Vogue UK do when the day is done? She heads home and cooks some more. "When it's freezing outside, cooking warming soups and stews gives me a reason to look forward to coming home," Gyngell says. "I like to relax in my kitchen, cooking and spending time with my two daughters." Join us for a tour of her kitchen and find out what she's cooking for Christmas. 

    Photography by Alexis Hamilton for British Standard, unless otherwise noted.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Double Copper Sink,  Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: Gyngell opted for a two-tone kitchen: Everything under the counter is dark, and everything above the counter is white. Her battered wood floors suggest a "working" kitchen and are in keeping with the spirit of cabinets from British Standard, Plain English's more affordable offshoot.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Double Copper Sink,  Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: The kitchen is on the ground floor of a west London terraced house and looks out onto the street. The tall cabinets on the left provide ample storage without looking too "kitchen-y."

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Double Copper Sink,  Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: A white Carrara marble backsplash running the entire length of the wall is matched by the same material on the countertop. The traditional cabinets, painted Hague Blue from Farrow & Ball, contrast with the clean details of the stainless steel Mercury 1000 Range Cooker and Hood. An open shelf continues the datum set by the height of the hood.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Double Copper Sink,  Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: The Deck-Mounted Goose Neck Faucet with Cross Hair Handles is from Perrin & Row.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Double Copper Sink, Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: Gyngell selected a copper sink for aesthetic reasons—she liked the way the copper looked with the Carrara marble worktop and the dark cabinets underneath.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Double Copper Sink,  Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: A shimmer of copper is glimpsed through a partially open cabinet door.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Double Copper Sink,  Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: Copper has essential antimicrobial properties, which has its advantages when it comes to kitchen sinks.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Black Glugell Ceramic Jug, Green Glass, Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above L: A Gurgling Cod Pitcher from the Gluggle Shop in the UK holds herbs. Above R: Gyngell introduces dark green to the palette through colored glass bottles. 

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: The chef's vintage cookbooks are easily accessible via open shelving on one side of the island. A painting propped on the counter is a warm addition to the Carrara marble backsplash. (Want to try this in your kitchen? See The New Art Gallery: Paintings in the Kitchen.)

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: A detail of a customized drawer pull provided by Plain English, British Standard's bespoke parent company. 

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: A wall-mounted white BL6 Light from Bestlite provides task lighting along the clutter-free worktop. "I don't have a food processor. I do everything in a pestle and mortar. I love hands, the connection with food," she told the London Times recently. Her arsenal includes "good knives from the Japanese Knife Company and Bourgeat pans."

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, Carrara marble countertop and back splash, Farrow & Ball Hague Blue Cabinets, Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: At the end of the kitchen, casual bench seating echoes the shape of the bay window.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, White Tall Cabinets with Leather Pulls, Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: The leather cabinet pulls are from Plain English, British Standard's parent company.

    Skye Gyngell kitchen by British Standard, White Cabinets with Brown Leather Pulls, Photography by Alexis Hamilton | Remodelista

    Above: Herbs are hung to dry from the tall cabinets with a wrought iron S hook. In 5 Quick Fixes, S Hooks with Style, we source some of our favorites.

    Skye Gyngell at Spring, Photograph by Amber Rowlands | Remdodelista

    Above: What's the chef cooking for Christmas? "On Christmas Eve, I'll cook with friends—something traditional like a big glazed ham," Gyngell says. "Everyone always makes a big fuss about desserts at this time of year, but I like to finish meals with just a few lovely fresh clementines." Photograph by Amber Rowlands.

    See more quintessentially British kitchens:

    And on Gardenista, we visit 10 Charming Carriage Houses.

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    To celebrate the season, we're teaming up with Healdsburg SHED—a market, cafe, and "modern grange" in Northern California—to give one Remodelista reader a $400 gift card to shop SHED's new Web store. Here are the details, plus a look at the festivities at SHED and a mandarin-orange drink recipe straight from the cocktail bar.

    Here's how to win:

    • Visit SHED's newly designed online shop.
    • In the Comments section below, tell us what you'd buy with a $400 gift card.
    • Submit your email address to the form at the bottom of this post.
    • The giveaway ends on Friday, December 19, at 11:59 p.m. EST. 

    Note: The sweepstakes is only open to residents of the United States. For more details, see the Official Rules. 

    This giveaway is now closed. The winner will be contacted shortly.

    Photography by Caitlin McCaffrey

    Healdsburg SHED and Remodelista Holiday Giveaway

    Above: Cindy Daniel, cofounder of Healdsburg SHED arranges a seasonal bouquet to anchor the cocktail bar. "There are few things that add as much color and happiness to a place as flowers and greenery," she says. "A natural palette incorporating marble, wood, cork, ceramics, and glass, is a great backdrop for flowers."

    Winter Mandarin Cocktail Recipe and $400 Giveaway with Healdsburg SHED and Remodelista

    Above: For easy entertaining, SHED offers a Cocktail Gift Set ($162) that comes with a shaker, strainer, jigger, bottle of small-batch Jack Rudy bitters, and a copy of Shake, a cocktail recipe book. 

    Winter Mandarin Cocktail and a $400 Giveaway on Remodelista

    Above: Handmade since the 1600s, Cindy swears by French Boxwood Paring Knives; $52 at SHED.

    Healdsburg SHED Drinks and Holiday Giveaway with Remodelista

    Above: Re-create the look of Cindy's cocktail bar with a Wooden Garden Trug ($58 to $86), Blackcreek Cutting Board ($180 to $225), and Yum Yum Ginger and Honey Tonic ($15). Cindy's entertaining tip to live by? "Parties are not about perfection. Enjoy your company and be at ease." We can drink to that. 

    Winter Mandarin Cocktail Recipe

    Created by Gillian Heiquist, Healdsburg SHED

    4 servings

    • 8 oz sweet vermouth, preferably Sutton Cellars Brown Label 
    • 1 cube La Perruche pure cane sugar
    • 6 shakes Scrappy's Aromatic Bitters
    • 2 kishu tangerines or 1 clementine, sliced with skin left on
    • 1 kishu tangerine, peeled and sectioned

    In a mixing glass, muddle sugar and peeled tangerines (muddle well to release the oils in the skin of the citrus). Add bitters and vermouth and stir. Fill pint glass with ice and stir or shake to chill; pour through a hawthorne strainer into aperitif glasses and garnish with citrus slices.

    Leave your email address in the form below. The winner will be contacted through the email provided.
     
     

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    Looking for something to thrill a hardworking host? Here are a range of everyday luxuries that you're almost guaranteed to find in use the next time you arrive.

    Handmade relish spoons from Sweet Gum Co of Tennessee | Remodelista

    Above: Relish Spoons are $40 each from Sweet Gum Co., which offers a range of handmade wooden spoons and cutting boards made in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

    Leather trivets by Ladies and Gentleman Studio from the Commons | Remodelista

    Above: Appétit Leather Trivets by Ladies and Gentleman Studio of Seattle come in three patterns and are $48 each. (They're also available from The Commons, see below.)

    Coffee Scoops from The Commons | Remodelista

    Above: Walnut Coffee Scoops are $24 each from The Commons, a new home goods store in Charleston, South Carolina.

    Mungo Napkins from Dara Artisans | Remodelista

    Above: Selveage Linen Napkins, designed and woven by Mungo of South Africa, are $18 each from global collective Dara Artisans, who are currently hosting a New York City pop-up shop at Atelier Courbet.

      Billy Cotton large mixing bowl from The Line NYC | Remodelista

    Above: Made by Brooklyn designer Billy Cotton, a Large Mixing Bowl—dishwasher and microwave safe—is $35 from The Line in NYC. (Read about The Line in A SoHo Dream Loft Where Everything Is for Sale.)

    Harvest bunch from the Kanorado Shop of Brooklyn | Remodelista

    Above: A goose and pheasant tail feather are included in this Harvest Bunch, $32, made by floral designer Eiko Fujii for Kanorado Shop, a Brooklyn-based online store run by a Japanese husband-and-wife team.

    Japanese pine-scented Bamboo Charcoal Incense from Anzu NYC | Remodelista

    Above: Japanese pine-scented Bamboo Charcoal Incense from Anzu New York comes in a wrapped wooden box with an incense stand in the shape of a bamboo branch.

    Klein vase from Golden Biscotti | Remodelista

    Above: Made of unglazed porcelain, the 13-centimeter-tall Vase Klein from Swiss studio Golden Biscotti is 48 SFr ($49.81).

    Charvet Editions Dish Cloth from Flotsam + Fork | Remodelista

    Above: Classic linen Striped Dish Towels from Flotsam + Fork are woven in Armentieres, France. More absorbent than cotton and ideal for drying glassware without leaving a trace of lint, they're $19.95 each.

    Portuguese Olive Oil Drizzler Can from Saudade of London | Remodelista

    Above: Saudade of London specializes in Portuguese staples, such as this Olive Oil Drizzler Can; £17.50 ($27.53) 

    Sugarloaf Candles by Pelle Designs | Remodelista

    Above: Peppermint-scented Sugarloaf Candles start at $24 each. They're made by Pelle Designs, a Brooklyn architecture and design studio run by husband-and-wife team Jean and Oliver Pelle.

    Ambatalia Furoshiki from Anaise SF | Remodelista

    Above: The Amabatalia Furoshiki in Charcoal Stripe—a kitchen cloth that doubles as a bag and an apron, among things—is $28 from Anaïse of SF. Yes, instructions are included. Learn more in our post DIY: How to Wrap a Furoshiki Cloth.

    Tallow Candles by Tineke Beunders and Nathan Wierink from Merci Paris | Remodelista

    Above: Tallow Candles, made by hand at the Eindhoven Studio in the Netherlands, are €15.90 ($19.80) each at Merci in Paris. For details about the shop, read Paris's Most Exciting Shop Is Now Online. And for more portable candleholders, see 10 Favorites: Modern Chambersticks for Making Your Way in the Dark.

    Doug Johnston Large Pencil Bucket from Totokaelo | Remodelista

    Above: Doug Johnston's Large Pencil Bucket, handmade of rope and thread, is $45 from Totokaelo of Seattle. (Take a look at Totokaeolo's Fashion-Forward Office.)

    Porcelain Table Lanterns from Herriott Grace | Remodelista

    Above: Toronto-based father-daughter workshop Herriott Grace offers these no-two-alike Porcelain Table Lanterns that are perfect for tea lights; $35 each. 

    We have everyone on your list covered. For more ideas, go to Gift Guides and browse Gardenista's Finds too.

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    Many years ago, I read On Persephone's Island, a journal by New York native Mary Taylor Simeti that chronicles her life in Sicily. Ever since then, I've thought of her charming account of using lemon boughs in place of evergreens to deck the halls of her home.

    This holiday season, as the cold descended on New England, where I live, I decided to take a page from Simeti's book and conjure the feeling of balmier climes with a Meyer lemon and mistletoe garland fleshed out with hardy greens from my own backyard.

    Photography by Justine Hand for Remodelista.

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, mistletoe, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: According to a NY Times article, mistletoe is less toxic than many believe, however it can cause stomach irritation and other symptoms if ingested in large quantities. Therefore, it should be kept out of reach of small children and pets. 

    Materials

    • A good bunch of mistletoe. I ordered 2 lbs of freshly cut mistletoe from eBay, which was enough to create my bough and more; $18.95. (For people with small children mistletoe fig is another good live option. People with cats should use fake mistletoe.)
    • 6 or 7 Meyer lemons preferably with leaves. I purchased mine at my local Whole Foods.
    • Any hardy green that won't immediately wither indoors. I used andromeda foraged from a shrub in my yard. Bay leaves are another good choice.
    • Clippers
    • Wire

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, meyer lemons, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: More richly colored and smoothly textured than their common cousins, Meyer lemons are perfect for holiday decor.

    Instructions

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, trimming andromeda, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Step 1: Begin the base of your garland by trimming your andromeda (or other leafy green) into small sections, leaving the bottom several inches of the stem bare.

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, andromeda base, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Step 2: Lay the andromeda stems in an alternating pattern, so that the leaves of each successive branch face the opposite direction. This technique will create a small space in between the leaves on each side.

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, adding in mistletoe, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Step 3: Tuck sprigs of mistletoe into the gaps of the alternating andromeda.

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, tying off, by Justine Hand for Remodedlista

    Step 4: Once you have your mistletoe laid out, secure it to the andromeda with some wire. Continue to work along the garland, connecting all loose ends, until the entire length is free of loose parts. If you're constructing your garland in a different place than where you plan to display it, now is the time to move it.

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, adding lemons, by Justine Hand for Remodedlista

    Step 4: Because of their weight, lemons are difficult to secure to the garland, so I simply placed them loosely along the sides.

    The Finished Look

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, finished, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: Voila! My mistletoe and Meyer lemon garland on my holiday table.

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, finished detail, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: The buds of andromeda nicely complement the white mistletoe berries.

    mistletoe meyer lemon garland, finished with candles 3, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: As a final touch, I added small glass votives along the length of the garland.

    mistletoe meyer lemon garland, finished with candles, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: Since citrus leaves, mistletoe, and andromeda (and bayberry, too) tend to dry without losing their color and form, your garland should last at least a week.

    mistletoe and meyer lemon garland, finished detail 2, by Justine Hand for Remodelista

    Above: The low profile of the arrangement allows room to pass the potatoes—and to lean across and give the cook a complimentary kiss.

    N.B. Looking for more easy, outside-the-box holiday decor? Try these DIY projects inspired by nature.

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    Furniture maker Mark Tuckey and his wife, stylist Louella Tuckey, are known for pulling together rooms that are at once perfectly composed and enviably laid-back. Case in point, their beach house off Sydney's northern coastline and its simple living room with white walls, wood furniture, and just the right number of red and orange accents that have us wanting to try the same mix at home. Here's a look at the design, followed by all of the essentials for re-creating the look. 

    Mark and Louella Tuckey in Australia | Remodelista

    Above: The Tuckey's light-filled living room, spotted on Design Files. The couple have a well-known shop, Mark Tuckey Home, with locations in Sydney and Melbourne, and their living room features Mark's own pieces mingled with design classics and a few well-chosen objects. Photograph by Sean Fennessy via Design Files.

    Mark Tuckey Box Day Bed I Remodelista  

    Above: The Mark Tuckey Box Day Bed comes in a recycled hardwood that Tuckey calls Oregon or an oak finish and can be upholstered in any fabric. Contact Mark Tuckey for pricing.

    Mark Tuckey Oxo Coffee Table I Remodelista  

    Above: The Mark Tuckey Oxo Coffee Table is available is American oak, ash, and Oregon. Contact Mark Tuckey for pricing. 

    pigeon-holes-mark-tuckey-remodelista  

    Above: The Pigeon Holes bookshelf is freestanding and can be used on its own or stacked (as shown here) and works well as a room divider. It's made of Oregon and is also available in a lighter 25-millimeter plywood with lacquered or white-painted panels. Contact Mark Tuckey for pricing. 

    Borge Mogensen Spanish Chairs in Oak and Natural Leather I Remodelista

    Above: Børge Mogensen's Spanish Chair in oak and natural leather, a classic designed in 1958 after a trip to Spain, is $3,852 from the Danish Design Store. It's also available in black leather and natural oak, and black leather and ebonized wood.

    Tolomeo Mega White-Floor Lamp I Remodelista  

    Above: The Tolomeo Mega Terra White Floor Lamp by Artemide is $937.50 from Ambiente Direct. 

    Australian Artist David Band Red Glass Silkscreen Print | Remodelista

    Above: The Red Glass, a print by Australian artist David Band, is one of an edition of 12; inquire about availability. Another Band print of a trumpet, A Night in Tunisia, hangs on the living room wall.

    Felt Chakati Cushions from Mark Tuckey I Remodelista

    Above: The Tuckey sofa is layered with Megan Park's cushions, along with Felt Chakati Cushions, shown here, that are handmade in Nepal; $110 AUD ($90.34 USD) each via Mark Tuckey's online shop.

    Mongolian Lamb Pillow Cover in Pebble from West Elm I Remodelista  

    Above: For a third sofa texture, the Tuckeys introduce a single furry pillow. The Mongolian Lamb Pillow Cover in pebble is $169 from West Elm. The cover measures 14 by 36 inches and is also available in white and platinum.

    Cow Hide Rug from West Elm I Remodelista  

    Above: Cowhides make durable, low-maintenance throw rugs. This example, a Cowhide Rug from Argentina, is $549 at West Elm.

    Senegalese knitting basket from Connected Artisans | Remodelista  

    Above: The Tuckeys use a basket to hold throw blankets and as a side table. This Knitting Basket handwoven in Senegal, is $55 from Connected Artisans, which offers baskets in a range of sizes and styles.

    Hank and Hunt DIY wood bunting | Remodelista

    Above: Wooden bunting hangs casually around the living room's French doors. Consider making your own: Learn how at Hank & Hunt, whose DIY Wood Bunting is shown here.

    Explore more of Mark Tuckey's designs in our post A Surfer Sets Up Shop. Curious to see what the rest of the Tuckeys' place looks like? Visit The Design Files. And see more Steal This Look features on Gardenista and Remodelista.

    This post is an update; the original ran on March 25, 2014, as part of our Spring Forward issue.

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    Our roundup of the best (nonplastic) Christmas tree stands of the year, heritage edition.

    Ferm Living Tree Stand | Remodelista

    Above: The powder-coated iron Christmas Tree Foot from Swedish company Ferm Living; €43.20 ($53.75).

    Bowlings Last Christmas Tree Stand | Remodelista

    Above: Bowling's Last Stand Christmas tree stand is available in several sizes; prices start at $90. Handmade in Bear Lake, Michigan, by Floyd Bowling Jr. and Sr. since 1989, the stands are made of heavyweight powder-coated steel with T-bolts for securing the tree and tripod legs to prevent wobbling on uneven floors. One happy customer wrote, "It belongs in the permanent collection at MoMA."

    Turbin Christmas Tree Stand | Remodelista

    Above: The lacquered steel Turbin Christmas Tree Stand, $125, is available in white, red, green, and black from Scandinavian Design Center. 

    Swedish Tree Stand | Remodelista

    Above: The Danish Trip Trap Christmas Tree Holder made of wood and metal is 1,395 DKR ($233.27) from Design Klassiker Shop.

    Horne Christmas Tree Stand | Remodelista

    Above: The Christmas Tree Holder from Born in Sweden is made of recyclable aluminum and available in red, graphite, and black; $249.95 from Horne.

    Manufactum Christmas Tree Holder | Remodelista

    Above: The hand-sanded cast-iron Christmas Tree Holder from Manufactum features solid brass holding spikes and a zinc-painted interior to protect against rust; €275 ($342).

    Go to Holiday Decor for more ideas, including:

     

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    When it comes to decorating the holiday table, we say: the simpler, the better. Start with natural basics (leaves, persimmons, boughs of pine), add lights (by string or candle), and keep the rest neutral. Here are 10 that followed the recipe to great success. 

    Remodelista Holiday Table Rue | Remodelista

    Above: One of our all-time favorite holiday tables, Remodelista’s 2010 collaboration with Rue Magazine applied the 100-mile sourcing rule to everything from beeswax candles to dinner plates. Find all the elements to re-create the look in Steal This Look: Remodelista's Holiday Table for Rue Magazine

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: The Berlin dining room of blogger Katrin from Taking Notes needed only a few pieces to add holiday cheer. (Katrin sourced her dining chairs on eBay for about €20 ($25) each and painted an unfinished credenza in Farrow & Ball's Down Pipe.)

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: We like this table's black-and-white stripes and copper pipe chandelier overhead; spotted on Styling Pics

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: We appreciate this table by Amsterdam-based design blogger Desiree Groenendal of Vosges Paris for its ability to deck the halls from October through December. Find the elements in Steal This Look: A Versatile Holiday Table Arrangement.

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: The centerpiece of this table hangs from the ceiling. Photograph via Plant Hunting, the blog of NYC plant delivery service The Sill

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: We love the details on this holiday table by photographer and stylist Kara Rosenlund: feathers from molting chickens, olive branches, place cards taped to plates, and a hanging drinks bucket. Get the whole look in Steal This Look: A Rustic Holiday Table from Australia

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: This tablescape by Ariel Dearie Flowers for Sunday Suppers features jasmine and other vines “to create a feeling of nature quietly creeping in.” Photograph by Karen Mordechai

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: A petite Christmas tree on a Hans Wegner table sits alongside a mix of greens—pine and succulent—in glass vases. Photographs by Kira Brandt for Danish managzine Bo Bedre

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: Designer Jenni Kayne collaborated with The Chalkboard to create this foliage-filled holiday table. Photograph via Kayne's blog Rip + Tan. Find this and more in Current Obsessions: To Market, To Market

    Favorite Simple Holiday Christmas Tablescapes | Remodelista

    Above: On his black, gray, and brown holiday table, Norm Architects designer Jonas Bjerre-Poulsen tucked pine boughs under glassware by Sarah Böttger for Menu interspersed with tea lights by Tom Dixon. Photographs by Lise and Kristian Septimius Krogh for Bo Bedre.

    For more holiday decor inspiration, see:

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    Before Queen Victoria of England married a German prince, Christmas decoration was a very casual affair: A few branches of evergreen might be brought into the house and hung on the wall or placed on the window ledge, and a sprig of mistletoe might be suspended above a door. But when the young Victoria (whose mother was also German) became queen and started a family of her own, she adopted her husband's version of Christmas, and the Germans celebrated in a very big way. Famously, an engraving appeared in the Illustrated London News of the young royal family standing around a small decorated tree at Windsor Castle in 1848. The tree was lit and densely decorated with glass baubles. The British population saw it, gasped with awe, and that, as they say, was that.

    A glassworks had been established in the German town of Lauscha for about 250 years by the time Victoria married Albert. It produced flasks, bowls, and even the first artificial glass eyes prior to making glass ornaments for the Christmas tree. These were blown into clay molds and "silvered" on the inside before being painted on the outside. The earliest shapes were fruits and nuts, then pinecones, vegetables, and animals. This tradition spread further afield as the German borders changed after the Second World War, and today these ornaments are as likely to be made in Poland as they are in Germany. There are now such a variety of shapes available (at dramatically different prices) that we decided to focus on the birds and beasts that are still made in their traditional shapes. Here are some favorites.

    Five to Buy

    Glass ornament from Barneys New York | Remodelista

    Above: The Owl Ornament, made in Poland of glass with resin feet, is approximately 6.75 inches high from top hat to toe. It's $82 at Barneys; 25 percent of the proceeds are donated to Room to Read, an organization dedicated to promoting literacy.

    Above: A 4.5-inch-long, hand-painted Glass Trout Ornament is currently $4 (marked down from $8) at West Elm.

    Above: This shiny Gold Pig is fabricated by third-generation artisans in Germany using a restored original mold. It's $24 at ABC Home.

    Glass weasel ornament from Terrain | Remodelista

    Above: The Wind in the Willows-ish three-inch tall Glass Weasel from Poland is $16 at Terrain.

     

    Above: A tremendous range of glass ornaments are available at John Derian in NYC. This three-inch tall, hand-silvered and hand-painted Rabbit is made in Poland; $84. 

    Object Lessons columnist Megan Wilson is the owner of Ancient Industries and the curator of the Remodelista 100, a collection of essential everyday objects presented in the Remodelista book. Watch for her column every Tuesday, and have a look at her past lessons on iconic design, including Wall Calendars with a Design Pedigree and Kaj Franck's Teema Dinnerware.

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