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    What is it about Japanese camping gear that always seems to look so good? Chalk it up to a flair for good design and the ability to create practical furniture for small spaces. Case in point: Peregrine, a small Japanese outfitter that makes outdoor goods by hand. We've long been fans of the brand Snow Peak and are now adding this latest Japanese find to our camp purveyors list. And while Peregrine puts their furniture to the test in the great outdoors, its pieces look equally at home in the garden. Added bonus: All easily store flat when not in use. 

    Peregrine Folding Low Table | Remodelista

    Above: The folding Wing Table sits low to the ground and is made of walnut; ¥22,800 ($222). It's covered in a combination Tablecloth/Apron, ¥3,800 ($37), that is hand-stitched in Iwate by women survivors of the Japanese earthquake and tsunami of 2011.

    Peregrine Donkey Table | Remodelista

    Above: The Donkey Table is walnut and comes with a selection of leg sizes. The slatted top rolls up when not in use; ¥24,400 ($238). For information on the stools, see below.

    Peregrine Camp Furniture Settee | Remodelista

    Above: The lightweight Ecdysis Bench has cedar armrests that hold cups; ¥28,000 ($273).

    Peregrine Camp Stools | Remodelista

    Above: The oak-framed Tick Tuck Stool is adjustable to various heights and folds flat; ¥13,000 ($126.75).

    Peregrine Tote Bag | Remodelista

    Above: The Yes We Camp! Big Tote Bag has handles on all sides; ¥6,500 ($63).

    Peregrine Star Trivet | Remodelista

    Above: The Star Pot Stand is made of cedar, brass, and leather; ¥3,000 ($29.25).

    Peregrine Skillet | Remodelista

    Above:The Camel Potholder is leather; ¥3,800 ($37).

    Peregrine Printed Folding Settee | Remodelista

    Above:The Ecdysis Bench, patterned with a camouflage of trees and snow, is ¥28,000 ($273).

    To see the full line, go to Peregrine Furniture.

    Like the looks of camp furniture? Browse all our Camping posts, including 7 Classic Camp Cots for Summer Slumber and Hedge House Bedrolls.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Who isn't transfixed by flames? The winner of the Best Amateur-Designed Office Space in the Remodelista Considered Design Awards has a fixture that intrigued our readers: a portable wood-burning camp stove. Here are the hearth-warming details.

    The Shingled House Camp Stove | Remodelista

    Above: Located in a converted 10-by-10-foot backyard shed in San Francisco, the office is the work of Caitlin Long, mother of two, who chronicles her projects and family life in The Shingled House blog. Like everyone else, Long singled out the stove as her favorite element in the room: "I installed the wood stove (a portable camping stove) with my older son who loves to have a little fire going when he uses the office to study at night." 

    Denali Camp Stove | Remodelista  

    Above: The stove is from Kni-Co of Wallowa, Oregon, a company that specializes in a range of US-made lightweight, portable stoves (shown here) for use in tents as campfire alternatives. Long chose Kni-Co's Denali Camp Stove of 10- and 12-gauge steel, which it bills as the largest camp stove on the market (weight: 72 pounds).  Prices for the Denali start at $314.95.

    The Shingled House home office camp stove installation in progress | Remodelista

    Above: Long installed a fireproof cement board to insulate the wall behind the woodstove "so that we don't catch our shed on fire." She then spray-painted the board dark gray with Rustoleum—see the Before and After at The Shingled House.

    The Shingled House Denali Camp Stove | Remodelista

    Above: Here's the stove awaiting installation in the shed. Go to The Shingled House to see Long and her son put the pieces in place—and light the first fire.

    Winner of the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Best Amateur-Designed Office Space, Caitlin Long in San Francisco | Remodelista

    Above: The award-winning office, with a fireside stump (and a carbon monoxide alarm installed for safety). Says Long, "Obviously, it isn’t freezing here in San Francisco, so the woodstove isn’t a necessity for warmth, but it sure does add magic." 

    Anticipating an autumn chill? See 10 Easy Pieces: Freestanding Woodstoves for more options. And have a look at an Alpine Retreat for Rent in Switzerland—with a state-of-the-art kitchen and old-fashioned wood-burning stove that heats the whole house.

    Click here to see more winners in the Remodelista Considered Design Awards.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Small-space-living aficionados, take note of the versatility of the shepherd's hut, the UK's rustic answer to the Airstream. Last week we presented a vintage version converted into a traveling kitchen. Today we're visiting The Shepherds Hut Retreat, a "glamper's hideaway" on the grounds of an organic farm, pond included, in South Somerset. The four cabins in the compound are built in the style of Victorian shepherd's huts, which originally offered refuge to herdsmen during lambing season. Each of the 20-by-8-foot-wide units comes with its own compact kitchen, bathroom, double bed, and private deck. Inside and out, a natural and neutral palette keeps things simple while the thoughtful design maximizes efficiency. And if you're ready to try another version of nomadic living, check out the owner's Yurt Retreat down the road. 

    Images via The Shepherds Hut Retreat

    Shepherd's Hut Retreat, Somerset, UK | Remodelista

    Above: Each hut comes with its own private garden area. The structures are clad in vertical wood siding and horizontal shingles, and have corrugated tin roofs.

    Shepherd's Hut Retreat, Somerset, UK | Remodelista

    Above: Painted wood paneling adds a vintage feel to the kitchen, warmed by wood countertops. Compact backsplashes of stainless steel and tile protect the paneling above the stove and sink. Thinking of using wood counters yourself? Get the intel at Remodeling 101: Butcher Block Countertops

    Shepherd's Hut Retreat, Somerset, UK | Remodelista

    Above: All set for tea and toast—a small platform built into the corner of the countertop holds appliances.

    Shepherd's Hut Retreat, Somerset, UK | Remodelista

    Above: Vintage finds from the nearby market town of Bridport decorate the walls. 

    Shepherd's Hut Retreat, Somerset, UK | Remodelista

    Above: The platform bed cleverly combines a place to unpack and stash your bags.

    Shepherd's Hut Retreat, Somerset, UK | Remodelista

    Above: A flat-screen TV is perched on a ledge beside of the bed with storage underneath for books and sundries.

    Shepherd's Hut Retreat, Somerset, UK | Remodelista

    Above: Each hut has its own private eating area with views of the water.

    Shepherd's Hut Retreat, Somerset, UK | Remodelista

    Above: A slate sign marks the name of each hut. 

    If you're looking for other unusual places to stay, there's an Airstream trailer in the Boutique Lodging on Byron Bay and another at The Hotel Daniel in Vienna. And on Gardenista, take a look at a Tiny Retreat Built on a Boulder

    For more Small-Space Living ideas, peruse our archive. 

    Below: The Shepherds Hut Retreat is in South Somerset, near Devon and Dorset, a 2 1/2-hour train ride from London. 

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    We've long admired artist and designer Michelle de la Vega's low-cost kitchen. Situated in a 250-square-foot garage in Seattle that de la Vega converted for herself, it features a mix of new elements and reclaimed materials from local salvage yards.

    We also imagine this configuration installed in a garden shed, a barn, or any other outbuilding to create instant (and separate) summer guest quarters. See the rest of de la Vega's tiny home in the New York Times and in her portfolio at Michelle de la Vega.

    Above: The compact kitchen is situated on a wall of the main room, with a loft bedroom overhead. Photograph by Ira Lippke for the New York Times.

    The Basics

    Benjamin Sky Chief Porcelain Stem Mount Light

    Above: De la Vega's industrial overhead light is akin to the 12-inch Benjamin Sky Chief Porcelain Stem Mount Light; $208 at Barn Light Electric.

     

     

    John Boos Stainless Steel Kitchen Prep Table, Remodelista  

    Above: The John Boos Economy Stainless Steel Kitchen Work Prep Table measures 30 by 48 inches; $259 via Amazon.

    Enameled Cast-Iron Wall-Hung Sink

    Above: For an industrial-retro look, consider the American Standard Enameled Cast-Iron Wall-Hung Sink; $434.87 at eFaucets.

     

    Ikea Grundtal Wall Shelf, Remodelista

    Above: The versatile stainless-steel Grundtal Wall Shelf is $19.99 for the 31.5-inch-wide size at Ikea.

    Classic Wine Crates

    Above: Wine crates used as storage drawers and shelves are a great idea; contact your favorite winery to see about getting used wine crates. Other sources include your local wine store, Craigslist, or Wine Pine, which sells Classic Wine Crates for $20 to $35 each depending on size.

    Appliances

      Danby Compact Refrigerator, Remodelista

    Above: The compact Danby Designer Series (DAR125SLDD) 4.4 Cubic-foot Refrigerator includes glass shelves, a crisper drawer, and tall bottle storage; $245 at AJ Madison. For more ideas, see 10 Easy Pieces: Compact Refrigerators.

    Coleman Two Burner Propane Stove, Remodelista  

    Above: Not just for camping, the Coleman 2-Burner Insta-start Triton Propane stove offers 22,000 BTU in two independently adjustable, high-performance stainless-steel burners. It can cook for up to 1.1 hours with both burners on high (4.5 hours on low) on one 16.4-oz propane cylinder (sold separately). Make sure adequate ventilation is available; $59.95 at Amazon.

    Cuisinart Toaster Oven, Remodelista

    Above: The Cuisinart Toaster Oven Broiler with convection is $89.95 via Amazon.

     

    Waring Two Speed Bar Blender, Remodelista

    Above: A classic Waring Two-Speed Blender is $169 at Food Service Warehouse.

    Accessories

    Grundtal Magnetic Knife Rack, Remodelista   

    Above: We like the straightforward simplicity of the Grundtal Magnetic Knife Rack; $14.99 at Ikea.

    Snow Peak Cutting Board and Knife Set, Remodelista

    Above: Japanese luxury camping company Snow Peak makes a convenient, all-in-one Chopping Board and Knife Set; $39.95 for the medium size via Amazon.

    Pioneer Blue Enamel Campware, Remodelista

    Above: The 12-piece baked enamelware Pioneer Camp Set includes four place settings; $109.95 at GSI Outdoors. For more options, have a look at UK-made Falcon Enamelware and Barn Light Electric's Enamelware, made in the US.

    Sedlig Flatware

    Above: A 20-piece set of Sedlig Flatware from Ikea is $39.99.

    Picardie Glass Tumblers

    Above: A set of 24 assorted size Duralex Picardie Glass Tumblers is $72 at Williams Sonoma. Sets of six are also available ranging in price from $13.50 to $30 depending on size. See Object Lessons for more iconic cafe-ware made by Duralex.

    Simplehuman Steel-Frame Dish Rack

    Above: When there is no dishwasher, the Simplehuman Steel-Frame Dish Rack is very handy; $79.95 at Williams-Sonoma. Go to 10 Easy Pieces: Countertop Dish Drainers for more ideas.

    Wesco Singleboy Trash Can, Remodelista

    Above: A trash bin with a top is essential to an open-space kitchen; the German-made Wesco Singleboy 3.4-Gallon Trash Can is $129.95 at Crate & Barrel. Looking for cans that can also take on recycling? Margot rounded up 10 Recycling Bins worth considering. 

    For more camp style, see:
    • Form Meets Function in the Great Outdoors 
     
    High-Style Camping Gear from Japan
     
    10 Easy Pieces: Folding Camp-Style Chairs
     
    9 Folding Camp Stools for Parade Watching.  

    More looks to steal? See all of our Steal This Look features.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on June 22, 2010.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    The winner of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards Best Amateur-Designed Bedroom is Anne S. Holtermann of South Dartmouth, Massachusetts.

    Holtermann's project was chosen as a finalist by guest judge Gael Towey, who said that she likes "the overall summery feeling of the room—the tile floor and bright informal accessories, and the large windows that let in lots of light. The unmatching dressers that double as side tables are an excellent use of space and give the room style and personality. My favorite feature is the picture rail above the bed that echoes the rough beam overhead—it's like a drawing on the wall."

    Take a look at Holtermann's design and hear what she has to say about her hardest-learned lesson, travertine floors, and where she splurged and where she saved. 

    N.B.: This is one of a series of posts spotlighting the winners of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards. We'll be featuring one winning project each weekday for the next two weeks. Go to the 2014 Considered Design Awards to see all the entries, finalists, and winners. And have a look at the winners of the Gardenista Considered Design Awards, too.

    Winner of Best Amateur Bedroom in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Anne S. Holtermann | Remodelista

    Anne S. Holtermann's Design Statement: This is a little maisonette that I refurbished from top to bottom using local materials, found materials, old materials, and my own wits. I love a good mixture of color and calm, clean but interesting, and a design that can easily be changed with the smallest amount of effort—just move a vase or add a new bright pillow and change a room! I wanted the space to be quiet and romantic for a couple or perfectly peaceful for one. True calm. 

    Winner of Best Amateur Bedroom in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Anne S. Holtermann | Remodelista

    Q: Where do you live? 
    A: At present I spend my time between South Dartmouth, New York City, and the South of France. My place that I submitted to the competition is a small, short-term rental property that was a total shambles when I bought it. I wanted to create a stylish and practical environment for my guests.  

    Winner of Best Amateur Bedroom in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Anne S. Holtermann | Remodelista

    Q: What was your biggest splurge?
    A: The bed! It's an emperor-size DUX bed with a goose-down topper, and I bought outrageously expensive linens! My guests always thank me.

    Winner of Best Amateur Bedroom in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Anne S. Holtermann | Remodelista

    Q: What were the hardest lessons you learned along the way? 
    A: Spell out exactly what people who are working for you are supposed to do. Leave nothing to chance, such as bathroom tile pattern installation. Not everyone knows to stagger a subway tile!

    Winner of Best Amateur Bedroom in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Anne S. Holtermann | Remodelista

    Q: Did you cut any corners?
    A: Almost all of the furniture was stuff I'd had in storage for years. Some of it needed a bit of work—cleaning, repainting, etc.—but I was very happy that it all just kind of worked. I really didn't have to purchase any new pieces. 

    Winner of Best Amateur Bedroom in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Anne S. Holtermann | Remodelista

    Q: What is your favorite feature of the project?
    A: I'm very happy with the cathedral travertine floors that actually ended up being slightly less expensive than the wooden floors I was initially going to put in. They look as though they've always been there, plus they're lovely to walk on and easy to take care of.

    Q: What is your day job? 
    A: I'm an artist—large-scale abstract/color field paintings. 

    Q: What is your best secret design source?
    A: I love architectural salvage places all over the world. I also can never pass up a beautiful piece of driftwood, an interesting stick or branch, or a smooth lovely stone. I've carted rocks many miles! Nature is truly one of my greatest design sources.

    Q: What projects would you tackle if you had an unlimited budget?
    A: I'd love to take on a large-scale project; a small hotel would be ideal. I'm also addicted to textiles of all sorts, old and new, so it would be nice to have a project to use them all in.

    Q: Which architects or designers do you admire?
    A: Axel Vervoordt—who doesn't?

    Congratulations to Anne S. Holtermann! See all winners of the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards here:

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    It isn't until the power goes out that we consider what the average evening was like before electric light. The ill-prepared are plunged back in history to a time when candles served as the best form of illumination. The better equipped turn to the hurricane oil lantern, which provides the light of at least a half dozen candles. What is romantic to us now was miraculous back in 1783 when a Swiss physicist discovered a way to increase the flame's power with the use of oil, a wick, a glass funnel, and oxygen. With the turn of a small knob, the flame could be controlled according to the length of the wick—a luxury never before known. Today hurricane lanterns are as likely to be used for entertaining in the garden and camping as they are for use in storms. Here are some classic oil-burning examples.

    Above: Vintage and new lanterns are widely available on eBay and Etsy for less than $50 each. Photograph of a summer cottage in upstate New York by Leslie Williamson.

    Five to Buy

    Above: German company Feuerbrand have been manufacturing Backyard Oil Lanterns since 1902. This one is 10 inches tall and 5 inches in diameter, and burns for 20 hours. It's available in a galvanized finish (shown), white, aqua, yellow, pink, and orange; $68 at Terrain.

    Above: A detail of the Feuerbrand steel lantern shows the sardine-can-style key for adjusting the height of the wick, and the screw-top opening for oil. The glass is heat and frost resistant.

    Above: The Lampe Tempête is made by Guillouard of France, a rival to Fueurbrand. It's available in a variety of colors, as well as galvanized and brass finishes, and comes with a liter of lamp oil and three wicks; €58 at Guillouard. 

    Above: The Davy Lamp, was originally used in British coal mines before becoming popular for use on yachts. This solid brass version provides 30 hours of burn time and is 10 inches tall and 3.5 inches in diameter; $180 at Best Made Co.

    Above: The W. T. Kirkman No. 1 Little Champ has a rust-resistant galvanized tin finish on steel. It's 12 inches tall and offers "nine-candle power"; $19.95 at W. T. Kirkman Lanterns.

    Stelton Hurricane Lamp | Remodelista

    Above: Designed by Erik Magnussen, the Stelton Ship's Lamp is a modern take on the hurricane lamp; the 13.3-inch-tall Stelton Ship's Lamp Small is $549 and the Stelton Ship's Lamp Large is $689 from Fitzsu. (See it used as a hanging light fixture at Design Sleuth: Architect Craig Steely's Hanging Stelton Lamp.)

    For more Outdoor Lighting ideas, have a look at Gardenista's finds, including DIY Mason Jar Lanterns to Light Up the Night.

    Object Lessons columnist Megan Wilson is the owner of Ancient Industries and curator of the Remodelista 100 presented in the Remodelista book. Watch for her column every Tuesday, and have a look at her past lessons, including The Hudson's Bay Point Blanket and The Classic Canvas Tote Bag. We featured her Connecticut shop in our post Purveyor of the Practical and the Timeless.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    When did the dustpan get so stylish? Here are a dozen from around the world that are too handsome to relegate to the utility closet.

    Andree Jardin Dustpan | Remodelista

    Above: The Dustpan by Mr and Mrs Clynk for Andrée Jardin is made of French beechwood and galvanized steel, and is available in orange or blue; €24 from Andrée Jardin.

      Geoffrey Fisher Trook Broom Pan | Remodelista

    Above: Handmade in the UK by Geoffrey Fisher, the Trook Broom and Pan is $68 from Flora Grubb. In the UK, the Trook Dustpan and Brush is £39.50 from TwentyTwentyOne.

    Riess Dustpan | Remodelista

    Above: Made in Austria by a company that dates back to 1550, the porcelain enamelware Reiss Dustpan is $25 (down from $30) at Restoration Hardware.

      West Elm Dustpan Set | Remodelista

    Above: The Dustpan and Brush Set from West Elm is available in two sizes: the small is $19 (down from $24), and the large is $27 (down from $34).

    Japanese Dustpan No. 6 Objects of Use | Remodelista

    Above: The handmade galvanized steel Dustpan No. 6 from Tokyo is £8 at Objects of Use.

    R. Russell Dustpan | Remodelista

    Above: Made by R. Russell of Chesham, Buckinghamshire, Dustpan No. 1 is £8.50 from Objects of Use. The hand broom shown here is currently not available, but a similar design, Hand Broom No. 3, made of horsehair and beechwood, is £12.50.

    Stainless Steel Dustpan Labour and Wait | Remodelista

    Above: The aluminum Giant Dustpan is £36 from Labour and Wait in the UK. In the US, the Professional 17-Inch-Wide Aluminum Dust Pan is $24.68 from Home Depot.

    Patent Ochsner Dustpan Brush | Remodelista

    Above: From Swiss company Patent Ochsner, the stainless steel, beechwood, and horsehair Dustpan Set is SFR 45 ($49.50).

    Redecker Chrome Dustpan and Brush | Remodelista

    Above: The Redecker Stainless Steel Dustpan and Brush is £20 from Plain Useful. In the US, the Redecker Stainless Steel Dustpan is $25 à la carte at Nessentials.

    Red Dust Pan Crate and Barrel | Remodelista

    Above: The steel, powder-coated Red Dustpan is $9.95, and the Redecker Natural Dustpan Brush is $14.95, both at Crate & Barrel.

    Menu Sweeper Funnel | Remodelista

    Above: Designer Jan Kochanski's Menu Sweeper and Funnel is $49.95 from Huset Shop.

    Redecker Stainless Steel Dustpan | Remodelista

    Above: The stainless steel, beechwood, and horsehair Dustpan and Broom Set by Redecker is $68 from the Joinery.

    For more cleaning-related ideas, see our Domestic Science posts, including:
    The Only Two Ingredients You Need to Make a Refrigerator Smell Fresh
    DIY: 10 Ways to Use Vinegar in the Home
    A Magic Fly Repeller
    The Sheila Maid Laundry Rack 
    And weigh in on our Dyson vs. Miele Vacuum Cleaner Debate

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    At Peddler’s Creamery in downtown LA, the employees ride a stationary bicycle as part of their job description. Why? Because the bike is connected to the ice cream churner, and if the employees don’t pedal, the ice cream doesn't get made. 

    Founded by Edward Belden, an eco-conscious bike enthusiast with a passion for small-batch organic ice cream, Peddler’s Creamery started as a one-man, five-gallons-at-a-time operation. When business picked up, Belden was ready for his own ice cream parlor. Enter LA architect Oonagh Ryan (a member of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory), who immediately understood the most compelling aspect of the business: “By placing a stationary bike that's connected to the ice cream churner in the public portion of the shop, employees and customers produce ice cream by pedaling—reducing the shop's carbon footprint, getting some exercise, and understanding the process all at the same time."

    Photographs by Eric Staudenmaier, unless otherwise noted.

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: At Peddler's Creamery, the stationary bicycle powers the ice cream maker, which is enclosed in the multicolored shingled box, aka the dairy. As employees and customers pedal away, ice cream is churned—and the ceiling sculpture made of bicycle parts is activated.

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: "Set front and center in the dairy is a little shadow-box window that enables customers to see the ice cream churn in action," Ryan says. The dairy is clad in brightly painted shingles made from deconstructed wood pallets.

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: A detail of the kinetic sculpture made of old bicycle parts.

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: A look at the rainbow of shingles and the shadow-box window. Photograph by Oonagh Ryan Architects.

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddler's Creamery, Churning Ice Cream | Remodelista

    Above: Inside the dairy, the ice cream is churned in a classic, rock-salt-filled, wooden ice cream maker. Photograph via Cool Hunting.

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: "We studied several forms for the dairy. In the end, the simple colored box set on a white-tiled bar won," Ryan says. "The window gives it a little beauty mark."

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: The shingles are coated in VOC-free paint, using colors that create a visual connection to the ice cream on display. (To get a handle on eco-friendly paint, read Remodeling 101: All You Need to Know About Low-VOC Paint.) Photograph via Cool Hunting.

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: Peddler's Creamery is at 458 S. Main St., in downtown LA (see map below).

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: The layout of Peddler's Creamery by Oonagh Ryan Architects.

    Oonagh Ryan, Peddlers Creamery Ice Cream, Los Angeles | Remodelista

    Above: An axonometric diagram details the relationship of the bicycle, sculpture, and dairy. Drawing by Oonagh Ryan Architects.

    Want to make ice cream at home? See 5 Favorites: Fuss-Free Ice Cream Makers. For an inspired city-rustic dining room, see The Modern Farm Table in Sydney. And on Gardenista, goat milk rules in From Goat to Table: Harley Farms on the California Coast.

    Peddler's Creamery is in newly happening downtown Los Angeles. 

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Spotted in the portfolio of Swedish designer Katarina Grundstromer: a charmingly ad hoc wall clock featuring numbers cut out from vintage book pages.

    DIY Paper Cutout Clock | Remodelista

    Above: Katarina GrundstromerSwedish interior designer and stylist, created her DIY clock for a kitchen—but it would look at home in any room.

    Karlsson Floating Hands Clock | Remodelista

    Above: The battery-powered Karlsson Floating Hands Clock, made of thin stainless steel, is $50 from the Little Clock Shop. Cut out your own numbers from a castoff book, or source Paper Numbers on Etsy.

    Vintage Paper Pages | Remodelista

    Above: Etsy seller Pickled Cherry Paper sells vintage book pages; a batch of 40 Vintage Pages is $6.

    More ideas? Browse all our Clock finds, including 10 Easy Pieces: Simple Kitchen Clocks and, on Gardenista, 10 Easy Pieces: Outdoor Clocks.

    Go to our DIY Projects for dozens of inspired—and easy—ideas.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    The winner of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards Best Professionally Designed Bedroom Space is Hyde Evans Design of Seattle.

    The firm's project was chosen as a finalist by Remodelista editor in chief Julie Carlson, who said, "This aerie corner retreat overlooking the sea manages to channel a nautical vibe without veering into twee territory; I like the mix of humble grain sack pillows, rag rug, and stool bedside table."

    Take a look at the project below and read what firm principal Barbara Hyde Evans has to say about her favorite features of the remodel and her best design sources. 

    N.B.: This is one of a series of posts spotlighting the winners of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards. We'll be featuring a winning project each weekday for the next week. Go to the 2014 Considered Design Awards to see all the entries, finalists, and winners. And have a look at the winners of the Gardenista Considered Design Awards too.

    Winner of Best Professionally Designed Bedroom in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Hyde Evans Design | Remodelista

    Hyde Evans Design's Design Statement: This beachfront house was built in 1935. Metal platform twin beds for guests hold a casual assembly of linen and cotton stripes. Boards with hooks line the room and utilitarian metal wall sconces hang next to each bed. A painted-wood chest and stool from nearby antiques shops serve as bedside tables.

    Winner of Best Professionally Designed Bedroom in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Hyde Evans Design | Remodelista

    Q: What are your favorite features of the project? 
    A: What we love most about the room is the mix of textures: the pick-stitch quilt, the various heavy linens, the metal platform beds, etc. 

    Q: What solutions did you find to your design problems?
    A: The room doesn't have a closet, so the hooks aren't just for looks. Even the large linen bag was needed to store guest towels.

    Q: Where did you cut corners? 
    A: Nothing was custom except the window treatments; everything else came from retail shops. We ordered the grain sacks on Etsy, along with the fabric used to make the bag hanging on a hook. 

    Q: Who worked on the winning project?
    A: Barbara Hyde Evans, Amy Lassila, and Benni Adams of Hyde Evans Design all collaborated to complete the project.

    Q: Where do you get your design inspiration?
    A: From everywhere—but if we had to name one thing: travel. The first time I saw a grain sack pillow was in Oia, Greece.

    Q: What does your firm specialize in? 
    A: Hyde Evans Design is an interior design and interior architecture firm based in Seattle with an office in Palm Springs, California. We specialize in residential and commercial design and have experience on many scales, ranging from new construction projects to fully designed remodels to redecoration of existing spaces. So, basically, we do everything.

    Q: What is your best secret design source? 
    A: Haystack Antiques in Bellevue and Kirkland, Washington. We purchased several items for this home from them, including the bedside trunk.

    Q: What is your favorite local shop?
    A: Schoolhouse Electric in Portland, Oregon. The light fixtures next to the beds came from Schoolhouse. 

    Q: Who is your dream client?
    A: We love a client who is really excited about the project. That leads to some fun collaboration and a better outcome.

    Q: What's next? 
    A: We're just starting work on a midcentury modern house in Palm Springs that over the years has been “updated.” We’ve been given the opportunity to take it back to its original character.

    Congratulations to Hyde Evans Design! See all winners of the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards here:

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    Lyon Porter, the mastermind behind Williamsburg, Brooklyn's first B&B (by day he's a managing director of Town Residential, a Manhattan real estate company), calls Urban Cowboy "the definition of a passion project." Porter worked with designer Renee Mee on the interiors, which he says feature "an industrial Williamsburg/Adirondack cowboy sensibility, complete with scavenged potbellied stoves, exposed joists and brick, and wide-plank, rough-hewn white pine floors." 

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg Facade | Remodelista

    Above: The facade features a cheery red door.

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg B&B Living Area | Remodelista

    Above: There are four bedrooms in the main house as well as a parlor floor that's open to all guests.

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg B&B Living Area | Remodelista

    Above: The parlor floor features operable garage doors that open to the courtyard; at the rear is a cabin with additional bedrooms for rent.

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg B&B Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: The pristine kitchen is available for guests to use.

    Urban Cowboy Living Room | Remodelista

    Above: Another view of the communal living room space.

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg B&B Sofa | Remodelista

    Above: A Chesterfield sofa.

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg B&B Dreamcatcher | Remodelista

    Above: A dreamcatcher.

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg B&B Stairwell | Remodelista

    Above: A graceful staircase leads to four second-floor guest rooms.

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg B&B Bedroom | Remodelista

    Above: The Lion Master Den has an en suite bathroom/dressing room.

    Urban Cowboy Williamsburg B&B Bathroom | Remodelista

    Above: The Lion Master Bath is detailed with a porthole window in the shower.

    Urban Cowboy Cabin Williamsburg | Remodelista

    Above: The Kanoono cabin in the rear is an Adirondack-style space "with a bit of Western American Indian flair," Porter says.

    Urban Cowboy Kanoono Cabin | Remodelista

    Above: A staghorn chandelier illuminates the Kanoono cabin bedroom.

    Urban Cowboy B&B Tiled Bath | Remodelista

    Above: In the Kanoono bath, the sink's plumbing pipes are wrapped in rope. 

    The B&B is at 111 Powers St., in Williamsburg, Brooklyn, NY. For booking information, go to Urban Cowboy

    See more New York City hotel tips, as well as recommended restaurants and shops, in our City Guide. On Gardenista, have a look at an Aussie Cafe in Brooklyn.

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    Here's a countertop that's billed as combining the best that nature and man have to offer. Engineered quartz, as its known, is made of quartz and flexible resins, a combination that has the strength of granite counters—with better impact resistance and more forgiving installation options. When Remodelista's Izabella Simmons remodeled her kitchen, she opted for engineered quartz on her island. After two years of hard use by her young family, Izabella reports, "It still looks like new."  Too good to be true? Here's what we've learned.

    Silestone Lagoon Kitchen Countertop, Remodelista

    Above: This Shaker-Inspired Kitchen in London has engineered quartz counters with a marble look, Silestone in Lagoon. Photograph via deVOL Kitchens.

    What is engineered quartz?

    Engineered quartz (not to be confused with Quartzite, another appealing natural stone used as counters) is a manmade product created mostly from natural materials. It's made of 90 to 94 percent ground quartz and 6 to 10 percent resins and pigments that are combined into durable and nonporous slabs. The strength of quartz, even in a manufactured form, makes it naturally resistant to abrasion, scratches, dents, and even acids without the need for sealants. And the environmental impact of manufactured quartz is low: Quartz is an abundant material and the finished product is nontoxic and nonallergenic, and will last a lifetime, reducing the need for replacement.

    Unlike solid-surface, Corian-type manufactured countertops, engineered quartz is not made to order. The product, like natural stone, is created in slabs of set sizes and thicknesses that vary by manufacturer. Caesarstone, for example, offers one slab size (56.5 inches by 120 inches) and two thickness options (0.75 inches and 1.25 inches). The slabs are fabricated to fit your project's requirements (size, shape, and edge profile), and are installed in pieces. 

    Caesarstone Cinder Counter, Remodelista  

    Above: The concrete-look countertops in this Bay Area Eichler Remodel are made of engineered quartz, Caesarstone Cinder. Photograph by Mark Adams.

    What colors and other options does engineered quartz come in? 

    One of the appealing features of engineered quartz is its wide variety of colors, patterns, and textures. And the range is continuously expanding, spurred on by competition between brands. Note that the color and texture of engineered quartz are more consistent than natural stone—to some this uniformity is an appealing feature and to others it's a drawback.

    Colors: The palette leans toward natural shades, but ranges from bright whites (one of the most popular options) to reds and blacks. 

    Ceasarstone Counter Blakes London, Remodelista

    Above: Honed white engineered quartz countertops in a UK kitchen by Jamie Blake of Blakes London, a member of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory. "There's a big trend at the moment to use lighter worktops instead of the darker granites," Blake says. "This has created a huge opening for products, such as quartzes, that come in light colors."  Photograph via Blakes London.

    Patterning: The surface of manufactured quartz depends on how the quartz is ground: Coarsely ground stone produces a flecked appearance, while finely ground has a smooth look. Manufacturers have also created colors and patterns that mimic natural stone, such as marble and granite, and have even created cement lookalikes (an appealing option, since cement itself is prone to cracking, chipping, and staining).

    Caesarstone Colors, Remodelista

    Above L to R: Three color options from Caesarstone: Belgian Moon, Cement, and London Grey. 

    Finishes: The options include polished, honed/matte, and textured surfaces.

    Caesarstone Pebble Countertop, Remodeilsta

    Above: In a kitchen by Mark Reilly Architecture—winner of a Remodelista 2013 Considered Design Award—the countertops are made of honed Caesarstone in Pebble. To add heft, the architect introduced a 1 1/2-inch mitered edge on the front face of the counters. Photograph by Paul Dyer.

    Are there different brands of engineered quartz countertops?

    Silestone and Caesarstone are the best known, but other brands, including Cambria, Celador, LG Viatera, and Zodiaq from DuPont (creators of Corian) are making their mark. These companies use words and color tones to try to differentiate their brands, but the reality is that their products are more alike than different. They all offer good warranties (the finer details will vary) and have similar price points and product features. The choice usually comes down to availability and color options.

    Engineered Quartz Countertop Khanna Schultz, Remodelista  

    Above: In a Park Slope kitchen addition, architecture firm Khanna Schultz, a member of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory, used Walker Zanger Pietra Cucina engineered quartz countertops (this line has been discontinued but rumor has it that Walker Zanger is introducing a new engineered quartz countertop line). "Engineered countertops are great options for durability," says architect Robert Schultz, "and there's a consistent, quality-controlled supply." Photograph by Antoine Bootz.

    Caesarstone Espresso Countertop by Lauren Rubin, Remodelista

    Above: New York architect Lauren Rubin's go-to brands for engineered quartz are Caeserstone and Celador. "They both grind their stones very fine to create a pure color," says Rubin. "I've used many colors, including deep browns, grays, and whites. I change the thicknesses and the finishes for different applications." In this New York apartment renovation, Rubin used Caeserstone Espresso. See the whole project in Weekend Spotlight: Combining Two New York Studio Apartments. Photograph by Alyssa Kirsten.

    Where can engineered quartz be used?

    Engineered quartz is hard, dense, nonporous, nonabrasive, and nonreactive to acids—attributes that make it perfect for use as countertops, backsplashes, walls, and even floors. Keep in mind that, like natural stone, it's heavy. And it's not recommended for use outside because the resins aren't UV stable (warranties are voided for outdoor applications). In terms of heat resistance, the material is reportedly not affected by temperatures lower than 300 degrees Fahrenheit. That said, it shouldn't be used as flooring over radiant heat because of possible damage from long-term exposure to heat.

    Silestone White Zeus Integrity Sink, Remodelista

    Above: Silestone offers a one-piece seamless sink made of the same engineered quartz used for the company's countertops. The Integrity One Piece Sink is available in single and double models.

    What about cleaning and maintenance?

    Engineered quartz countertops are easy to clean and maintain. Warm water and soap are recommend for day-to-day cleaning. For a stubborn spill, you can use a nonabrasive cleaner like Soft Scrub. The polished finish will stay intact with no need for ongoing maintenance other than avoiding abrasive cleaners that could dull the surface. Note that honed surfaces show more fingerprints and other signs of use than other finishes and require more frequent cleaning.

      Silestone Lyra Quartz Countertop, Remodelista

    Above: Silestone Lyra engineered quartz looks like marble but is far more forgiving. Unlike marble, engineered quartz is nonporous and doesn't require sealing. 

    How much do engineered quartz countertops cost?

    Slightly more affordable than premium natural stone and comparable to medium-range granite, engineered quartz generally costs between $70 and $120 per square foot installed. Price variations depend on color choice, configurations, and your location. And, like natural stone, don't overlook the availability of remnants. That's exactly what Remodelista's Izabella Simmons did for her bathroom countertops and backsplash: "I paid half the price ($40 per square foot) for Silestone, since I was able to find leftover pieces from someone else's project," she says. "It's always a good idea to check out the scrapyard."

    Ceasarstone Kitchen Countertops, Remodelista

    Above: Solid white engineered quartz, such as Caesarstone's Pure White and Silestone's White Zeus Extreme, trumps marble for its stain resistance and beats out Corian in heat resistance. In this San Francisco kitchen by Jute, a member of the Remodelista Architect/Designer DirectoryCaesarstone counters are paired with custom marble tiles. See Rehab Diary: A Small-Kitchen Makeover with Maximum Storage to tour the full project. Photograph by Drew Kelly.

    Engineered Quartz Countertop Recap

    Pros

    • Consistent in color and texture.
    • Stain-, scratch-, and acid-abrasion resistant.
    • Does not require sealing.
    • Won't chip and or crack (thanks to resins).
    • Resistant to bacteria growth.
    • Comes with long warranties.

    Cons

    • Lacks variations in patterning and veining. 
    • Installed in slabs so seams are visible.
    • Not as heat resistant as stone; trivet use is a must.
    • Not recommended for outdoor use.
    • Cannot be used as flooring over radiant heat. 

    Researching new countertops? Read 5 Questions to Ask When Choosing Your Kitchen Countertops. And for more on the subject, see the following Remodeling 101 posts.

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    Audrey McLoghlin's shirt company, Frank & Eileen, is named after her Irish grandparents. And though her designs are sewn in California from Italian chambrays and other fabrics, Audrey's Irish roots are woven into her business. "My parents emigrated to the States in the late 1970s and were the first in our family to make a huge sacrifice for the American dream. It's something I'm so thankful for. And because of this, I felt the collection had to be made in the US—it's my way of paying it forward."

    To celebrate Frank & Eileen's five-year anniversary and burgeoning success, the company has just moved into a proper home—one that's spread over 6,800 square feet and designed to evoke an old Irish country house. The showroom/office is the work of New York interior designer Melody Weir, who went shopping for old windows and chairs, and proceeded to create an astonishing stage set of sorts. The space is located on the top floor of the 1914 Lady Liberty Building, originally a billiard table factory and now converted into raw lofts for fashion showrooms. Filled with clever DIY solutions and off-the-rack finds, Weir's "house" offers plenty of designs ideas worth replicating at home. Make yourself a cup of Irish breakfast and take a look.

    Photographs by Torkil Stavdal.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: The space started as a wide-open loft with exposed brick and a buckling Sheetrock ceiling. After ripping out the Sheetrock (and applying six coats of paint to cover the rusty beams), Weir divided the setup into rooms by creating walls out of old windows. The center attraction is this grand hallway.

    Weir scoured LA for large and small windows, and "hit the jackpot at the Pasadena Habitat for Humanity." She made the tables, shown here, from old zinc warehouse fire doors set on white sawhorses. The hardwood floors are original to the factory.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: "A lovely man in LA, Mr. Lester Anderson, makes benches out of old chairs," Weir says. "I worked with him and picked the chairs; we put three together, painted them gray, and made seat cushions out of Frank & Eileen shirt fabric." The benches can be ordered on request at Melody Weir.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: The grand hall is 11 1/2 feet wide and 40 feet long. The glass bottles, known as demijohns, were purchased on eBay, Etsy, and online shop Italian Demijohn.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: A 20-foot-tall olive tree stands in the center of the grand hall. It's positioned between the archive room and the showroom, both of which have doors built from extra-long windows.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: In the archive/design room, the full collection of Frank & Eileen's shirts over the years are displayed on hangers suspended on jute twine hung from hooks in the ceiling. "I wanted the shirts to have a museum installation feel," Weir says.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: Designers work in the archive room on Borges Zinc-Topped Tables by Zentique. Victory Pendant Lamps from CB2 hang from the 20-foot-high ceiling. The wall cabinets are made from Ikea's Pax Wardrobes and Risdal doors.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: The showroom is anchored by a Lenox Charcoal Wool Woven Rug from Dash and Albert. The Salvaged-Wood Round Trestle Table and Madeleine Side Chairs are both from Restoration Hardware.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: Frank & Eileen's latest women's and men's collections are displayed on wooden dowels suspended from 1 1/2-inch marine rope. Go to Frank & Eileen to see the company's designs.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista  

    Above L: A detail of the twine-tied rope. Weir made the hanging bars from closet dowels and capped them with wooden finials from a hardware store. Above R: Women's belts are showcased on an old ladder against two-toned painted brick walls.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: Buyers who come to Frank & Eileen's are offered tea and biscuits—and can take a seat at the in-house tea bar. "The counter is made from T111 plywood with eight-inch, on-center grooves," Weir says. "It's topped with Carrara marble." She found the apothecary shelves at Olde Good Things in LA and painted them and the bar in a Farrow & Ball gray called Down Pipe. The Tea Canisters came from ABC Tea; Weir made the labels out of "Frank & Eileen shirt labels that we blew up and adhered to the tins."

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: The cafe table is a Habitat for Humanity find that Weir painted gray and positioned against the two-toned brick. To work well with Frank & Eileen's pinstripes, Weir adhered to a palette of white, gray, and black throughout.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above L: A wall of the tea bar is a Frank & Eileen scrapbook of sorts, decorated with what McLoghlin describes as "family photos, love letters, wedding announcements, and old Irish sayings." Weir gathered the frames at flea markets. Above R: The metal and leather bar stools came from Olde Good Things.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: The dramatic dining room features a wall collage made from Frank & Eileen shirt fabrics mounted on poster board and glued onto two connected sheets of plywood. It's the work of designer/maker Don McLoghlin, brother of Audrey. The windows came from Pasadena Architectural Salvage. The table is another Habitat for Humanity find that Weir painted gray and is surrounded by vintage bentwood chairs from Olde Good Things. The galvanized light came from the Fairfax Flea Market, in LA.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: The bathroom has beadboard wainscoting and a floor of light Carrara marble tiles from Home Depot. The sink is the Structure Lavatory and Pedestal Combo from Home Depot. Weir found the mirror at the Rose Bowl Flea Market and flanked it with Edison Caged Sconces from Restoration Hardware.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA designed by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: Weir used old windows to build a house-like peaked entrance off the elevator.

    Frank & Eileen showroom LA by Melody Weir | Remodelista

    Above: Rows of ivy, succulents, and other greenery are displayed on scaffolding. Weir reports that she got the shelves from Cornerstone Scaffolding: "We painted the poles with a Rustoleum rust-colored spray paint and painted the boards a medium gray." The pots are tool and screw bins and wooden grout boxes from Olde Good Things. Presented in rows, they impart a country feel to the top of the loft building.

    Melody Weir is a commercial and residential interior designer. See more of her work at the WellNest Store in Sag Harbor, New York, and at Melody Weir.

    Go to our photo gallery to browse our favorite Loft Spaces. And for more plant display ideas, have a look at A DIY Hanging Garden and other Planters & Plant Stands on Gardenista.

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    I wish Barn Light Electric had been around when I was searching for lighting more than a decade ago, during the remodel of my Mill Valley, California, house. That was during the pre-Internet dark ages, though; I used to drive to distant lighting showrooms and despair at the offerings. (My lighting would look very different if I were doing it now.)

    Bryan and Donna Scott, the founders of Barn Light Electric, started their company in 2008 with a focus on bringing back high-quality industrial American lighting, which had all but disappeared from the landscape. "We wanted to revitalize the craft of hand-spun porcelain shades," Bryan says. "But we discovered that this particular manufacturing process had died out 50 years ago to make way for less expensive techniques." According to Bryan, porcelain enamel was the industry standard in the early 20th century, used in factories and warehouses thanks to its ability to withstand the high heat and chemicals of industrial conditions. In 2013 the Scotts opened a new manufacturing facility in Titusville, Florida, and installed a porcelain enamel oven from Italy. They now produce a line of commercial-grade porcelain, steel-spun lights in a variety of styles and configurations. Here are four standouts, available in a range of colors.

    Brisbane Pendant Barn Light Electric | Remodelista

    Above: The Brisbane Cord-Hung Pendant; $185.

    Ivanhoe Sinclair Industrial Pendant | Remodelista

    Above: The Ivanhoe Sinclair Porcelain Pendant; $175.

    Barn Light Electric White Enamel Shade | Remodelista

    Above: The Ivanhoe Bomber Porcelain Pendant; $148.

    Porcelain Enamel Barn Light Fixture | Remodelista

    Above: The Ivanhoe Sky Chief Warehouse Porcelain Pendant; $153.

    To see the full porcelain collection, go to Barn Light Electric. Have a look at the company's new Veronica Valencia–designed collection of powder-coated aluminum lights in our post Turn on the Brights.

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    The winner of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards Best Amateur-Designed Living/Dining Space is Theresa di Scianni of East Hampton, New York.

    Di Scianni's project was chosen as a finalist by guest judge Luke Hayman, who said, "I like the way the legs of the Eames chairs and the shape of the spiral stairs and stove pipe complement the extreme angles and structure of the A-frame, while the vintage chandelier, old rugs, and quilt add texture and color in a comfortable, inviting way."

    Take a look at the project and read what di Scianni has to say about the design challenges and rewards of life in an A-frame. 

    N.B.: This is one of a series of posts spotlighting the winners of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards. We're featuring one winning project each weekday for the next week. Go to the 2014 Considered Design Awards to see all the entries, finalists, and winners. And have a look at the winners of the Gardenista Considered Design Awards.

    Winner of Best Amateur-Designed Living/Dining Space in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Theresa di Scianni | Remodelista

    Theresa di Scianni's Design Statement: I love an A-frame; as challenging as they may be, they lift your spirits high. Before moving to the Springs in the Hamptons, we lived in an A-frame in the hills of Los Angeles. My vision was to create a casual living environment that embodies California ease by introducing a bit of nature, treasures from our travels, magical fragrances, colorful textiles, and whatever else opens my heart.

    Winner of Best Amateur-Designed Living/Dining Space in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Theresa di Scianni | Remodelista

    Q: What were your practical goals for the project?
    A: Having no straight walls, it was a challenge to keep the space open and light. To remedy that, we painted the floors white and brought in low furniture.

    Winner of Best Amateur-Designed Living/Dining Space in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Theresa di Scianni | Remodelista

    Q: What were the hardest lessons you learned along the way? 
    A: Not doing my homework when hiring a contractor.

    Winner of Best Amateur-Designed Living/Dining Space in the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Theresa di Scianni | Remodelista

    Q: Where do you get your design inspiration? 
    A: My design inspiration comes from the smells and treasures of Pablo Neruda's houses in Chile, especially his coastal home in Isla Negra. As a Chilean diplomat, he traveled the world and was a master at finding collectibles at flea markets: exotic woods, colorful bottles, masks, and a million little things. He meticulously curated his houses like his poetry. Isla Negra embodied who Neruda was and what he loved. It inspired me to make my own house very personal.

    Q: What is your next project?
    A: I want to build an addition to our A-frame. My hope is that I can integrate a dramatic entrance, a practical mudroom, and a serene meditation area all in one space.

    Q: What is your day job? 
    A: Buyer and merchandiser for Matta in New York City and Sag Harbor.

    Q: Which architects or designers do you admire?
    A: Luis Barragan for his mastery of space, light, and color.

    Q: What projects would you tackle if you had an unlimited budget? 
    A: I would buy a sweet hacienda in Mexico with lots of land overlooking the water (preferably near a surf break) and build a hotelito.

    Q: Favorite local shop?  
    A: Of course my shop, Matta, in Sag Harbor, but I also love Love Adorned, in Amagansett. I can spend hours in there.

    Q: Best secret design source?​ ​ 
    A: Meditation.

    Congratulations to Theresa di Scianni! See all of the winners of the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards here:

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    Is Belgian designer Michael Verheyden's G55 leather sling chair the "it" seating piece of the moment? We think so. It was only a matter of time before the copycats took note.

    Michael Verheyden Leather Sling Chair | Remodelista

    Above: A G55 leather sling chair by Michael Verheyden in his Genk, Belgium, home that he shares with wife and partner Saartje Verecke. Photograph by Tim Vad de Velde via Dwell.

    Michael Verheyden Sling Chair | Remodelista

    Above: The Michael Verheyden G55 leather sling chair is made by hand by Verheyden and Verecke in their Genk studio. Price upon request; go to Michael Verheyden for information.

    Roost Arlo Leather Sling Chair | Remodelista

    Above: The Arlo Sling Chair from Roost is $990 from Heaven's Gate Home and Garden.

    See more of our High/Low design discoveries, including 5 Scandi Classics and Cloud Pendant Lights, and, on Gardenista, Fermob for Less.

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    Discovered on The Common Pursuit: A rustic cabin in Echo Park worthy of Henry Thoreau (and available for $115 a night). Photographer Brian Ferry of The Blue Hour spent a week there and says: "I had my coffee in the morning on the porch, sent some emails or read at the table, and later in the day, watched the sunset from the back deck. Simply done, but really thoughtful and tasteful." To see the listing, go to Airbnb.

    Photographs by Brian Ferry

    Above: The kitchen includes a hot plate, refrigerator, electric kettle, and assorted teas and coffee.

    Above: A collection of vintage tableware.

    Above: Everything is within easy reach in the tiny cabin.

    Above: A table for two.

    Above: Vignettes.

    Above: There's a postage-stamp-size deck with seating.

    Above: The shower floor has Moroccan tiles.

    Above: Morning coffee on the deck.

    Heading to LA? Consult our City Guide for places to stay, shop, and eat. And go to Rental Houses for standout recommendations the world over.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on August 3, 2012, as part of our Cabins & Camping issue.

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    There is something universally appealing about the humble camp-style bath. Here are our favorites from far-flung places (Japan, Finland, Denmark, England, and the US).

    Above: A plywood-clad bath in Japan by mA-style Architects via Design Boom. Note the clever towel bar hung above the sink.

    Above L: Clean-lined rusticity from the portfolio of photographer Richard Powers. Above R: A sink in a house in Little Venice, London, by architects Wells Mackereth.

    Cabin Style Bath with Wood Paneling | Remodelista

    Above: A vintage sink in a bath in Sorrento Beach, Western Australia, by Shareen Joel Design of the website Share Design.

    Above: A bath in the UK by Mark and Sally Bailey of Baileys Home.

    MW Works Architecture and Design Bath | Remodelista

    Above: A wood-paneled bath overlooking the Puget Sound in Seattle by MW|Works Architecture.

    Above L: A rustic bath via Idlewild Designs. Above R: A log cabin bath via Danish magazine Femina.

    O'Connor-Houle-Melbourne-Mornington-Peak-wood-lined-master-bath-and-shower-outdoor

    Above three photos: In a Melbourne design by O’Connor and Houle, a floor-to-ceiling opening in the master bath and shower has the liberating effect of an outdoor room. Photographs from our post Slow House: A Serene Cabin in the Woods.

    Ardesia Design Gstaad Chalet Bath | Remodelista

    Above: Ardesia Design created an illuminated niche for a tub in a Gstaad chalet bath with wood paneling.

    Kobayashi Bathroom in Japan photo by Dean Kaufman | Remodelista

    Above: In the Kobayashi residence, a weekend retreat for a Tokyo couple, fiberglass doors open to the outside. Photograph by Dean Kaufman via Dwell.

    Freestanding or built-in bathtub? Figure out which is right for you in our recent Remodeling 101 post. See hundreds of inspiring Bathrooms in our Photo Gallery.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on August 27, 2012 as part of our issue The Last Gasp of Summer.

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    Like us, the Gardenista editors have been celebrating the Considered Design Award winners all week—while also hiding out in idyllic summery settings. Let's join them.

    Steven Harris Architects Napa Pool Considered Design Awards | Gardenista

    Above: The winner of the Gardenista Considered Design Awards Best Hardscape Project is Steven Harris Architects of New York City for this panoramic pool in the Napa Valley. Guest judge Neisha Crosland said she loves "the way the pool cuts through the natural landscape like a sneaky alligator."

    Heath Neutra House Numbers | Remodelista

    Above: "Everyone has a front door. No matter where you live, the elements you see when you approach your entryway should make you feel happy you're home," Michelle writes. See her 10 Easy Pieces: Tile House Numbers for these and other winning examples. Photograph via Alabama Chanin.

    New Eco Landscapes Brooklyn Garden | Gardenista

    Above: A concrete wasteland transformed. In Garden Designer Visit, Barbara tours a High-Line-Style, Low Maintenance Brooklyn Backyard. The astonishing news: It took only a month for New Eco Landscapes to enact the total makeover.

    Field Guide to Dahlias | Gardenista

    Above: "They compete to wear the loudest clothes in colors that range from spray-tan orange to bubble-gum pink. And they always travel in a pack." Learn all about these showstoppers in Field Guide: Dahlias.

    Rick Joy Woodstock Shingle Roof House | Gardenista

    Above: Wood shingles have an undeniable allure. But applying them to roofs isn't without complications. In Hardscaping 101: Wood Shake and Shingle Roofs, Janet delves into the pros and cons—and presents some very pretty pictures.

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    The winner of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards Best Professionally Designed Bath Space is Etelamaki Architecture of Brooklyn, New York.

    The firm's project was chosen as a finalist by Remodelista editor in chief, Julie Carlson, who said: "I love the mix of materials in this project: the original brick wall, the modern tub, the DIY Lindsey Adelman brass chandelier, the strip of wood used as a mount for the tub faucetry. It's a modern functional space but with plenty of character."

    Take a look at the project and read what firm principal Jeff Etelamaki has to say about introducing warmth to a featureless space and using inexpensive elements to create a cohesive whole.

    N.B.: This is one of a series of posts spotlighting the winners of the Remodelista Considered Design Awards. We're featuring one winning project each weekday for the next week. Go to the 2014 Considered Design Awards to see all the entries, finalists, and winners. And have a look at the winners of the Gardenista Considered Design Awards.

    Winner of Best Bath in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Etelamaki Architecture | Remodelista

    Etelamaki Architecture's Design Statement: Located on the top floor of a wood-frame townhouse in South Park Slope, Brooklyn, this master bathroom is connected to the adjacent master bedroom by an oversize doorway with a steel and glass sliding door that, when fully open, blurs the boundaries between the two rooms and creates an interconnected space. The fixtures are placed around a nonfunctional brick chimney and “hearth” focal point. The toilet is contained in its own private compartment.

    Winner of Best Bath in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Etelamaki Architecture | Remodelista

    Q: What were your practical goals for the project?
    A: 
    The challenge of the whole project, a gut renovation, was to create a modern and bright yet comfortable home for a family of four on a fairly limited budget. Throughout, a primary goal was to bring warmth into a space that was lacking in historical details or any real character, inside or out.

    Winner of Best Bath in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Etelamaki Architecture | Remodelista

    Q: What solutions did you find to your design problems? 
    A: 
    For this particular room, the design really took shape once demolition was complete and the brick chimney was exposed. It immediately stood out as a strong organizational element, both functionally and aesthetically. The thought of soaking in the tub across from a fireplace (even one that doesn't function) just feels very cozy, and with that relationship established, the other fixtures fell into place. Incorporating the chimney introduced a strong visual component, and the rest of the finishes were chosen as complements not only to the red-brown color, but also the rough-around-the-edges texture of the brick.

    Winner of Best Bath in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Etelamaki Architecture | Remodelista

    Q: What was your biggest splurge? Where did you cut corners?
    A: 
    There wasn't a lot of room in our budget for splurging, and rather than cutting corners we made an attempt to bring together basic, inexpensive elements to create a cohesive whole. Examples of this include retaining and bleaching the existing oak strip flooring, using an off-the-shelf Ikea vanity, purchasing all tile for less than $6 per square foot, and making the pendant fixture ourselves. Even for the nonstandard items, we managed to get good value: The custom steel door was made by a kitchen shop on the Bowery, and all of the teak millwork was built on site by our carpenter.

    Winner of Best Bath in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Etelamaki Architecture | Remodelista

    Q: What are your favorite features of the project?
    A: 
    It's a real luxury to have a shower large enough that a door or curtain becomes unnecessary! I was also happy to be able to have such a large window in this very private space by specifying acid-etched glass. We had debated closing off the window in favor of a skylight, but the window gives the space a more human scale, and it's nice to be able to crack the window and let in a little crisp, cool air while you take a hot shower.

    Winner of Best Bath in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards, Etelamaki Architecture | Remodelista

    Q: Who worked on the winning project?
    A: 
    Jeff Etelamaki oversees all projects for the firm, and was assisted on this project by Shenier Torres and Mayumi Tomita. Photographer Mikiko Kikuyama took all the photos.

    Q: What does your firm specialize in?
    A: 
    We've had the privilege of working on a very diverse range of projects—everything from a treehouse to a high-end urban spa.

    Q: What is your dream project or who is your dream client? 
    A: 
    Public projects are a lot of fun, but I find the scale and intimacy of residential projects, and the emotional investment those clients make in designing their own homes, very appealing. I've also been lucky to work with many intelligent, creative, and open-minded people who act more as collaborators than clients. 

    A dream project would be a home for a bibliophile, partially because a wall of books is one of my favorite design elements. It would also be an interesting challenge to explore how the current, rapid evolution of the way in which we read, from the physical book to the digital, informs the library as an architectural space and the book as an artifact.

    Q: What is your best secret design source?
    A: 
    There are many great online resources for inspiration, but there is no substitute for experiencing things for yourself—whether by traveling to see a new building or art exhibition, exploring an unfamiliar part of the city, or simply understanding how it feels to sit on a particular piece of furniture. I also try to maintain a sketchbook to record ideas or things that inspire me. The act of drawing leaves a much stronger impression in your memory than snapping a photo with your iPhone (even if the sketching is now done with a stylus on an iPad). 

    Q: What is your favorite local shop?
    A: 
    The Bklyn Designs and Factory Floor furniture shows in Brooklyn always have great new furniture and lighting designs.

    Q: What is your next project?
    A: 
    We are currently working on several townhouse renovations in Brooklyn, furniture design for a Manhattan apartment renovation we recently completed, and restoring an architect-designed midcentury modern home in the country.

    Congratulations to Etelamaki Architecture! See all the winners of the 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards here:

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