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    There was a period a while back when my favorite summer sleeping accommodations were relegated to camping's dark ages by the emergence of ultra-engineered gear. But for those of us who still prefer canvas, the good old cot is back. And it's more stylish (and, yes, a bit more high tech) than ever. 

    beechwood folding cot: Remodelista

    Above: Designed by the director of a Danish technical college to be "as comfortable as a real bed," Manufactum's Beechwood Folding Bed is also one of the most stylish cots we've seen. It has a solid wood frame with a linen flax bed and carry bag; €380.

    Peter Hofer cot: Remodelista

    Above: A reproduction of the classic British army cot in sophisticated, leather-trimmed black canvas, Peter Hofer Jagdwaffen's Camp Cot is a made of solid rosewood with brass brackets and hinges; €833.

    Tobago cot: Remodelista

    Above: Teak with a Batyline cloth cover, Tectona's Tobago Folding Bed represents the height of cot luxury; $1,910.

    Small Camp Bed

    Above: The Small Camp Bed measures 44 inches long and costs €190 at Serendipity, in Paris. 

    Maine Heritage Cot: Remodelista

    Above: A more economical yet still stylish take on a classic, Byer's Maine Heritage Cot features a hardwood frame and durable polyester cover; $129.

    Alps Lightweight cot: Remodelista

    Above: Reminiscent of vintage steel-framed army beds, the Alps Lightweight Camp Cot weighs in at only 11.5 pounds. Available at Sportsman's Warehouse; $49.99.

    Slumberjack cot: Remodelista

    Above: Slumberjack's Tough Cot has a 350-pound capacity; $69.99 on Amazon.

    Of course, there are always vintage options—I bought my own wood-framed cot with sun-bleached white canvas on Etsy.

    Want more essentials for life under the stars? Browse all our favorite Camping Classics. And have a look at Gardenista's recent roundups of Canvas Tepees and Nap-Worthy Summer Bunkhouses.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on July 11, 2013, as part of our issue The Summer Bedroom.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote in each of the 17 Considered Design Awards categories, on both Remodelista and Gardenista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 8.

    In the Best Office Space/Amateur category, our five finalists are Tessa Neustadt, Caitlin Long, Corinne H., Rebecca Hepburn, and Jane C.

    Project 1

    Tessa Neustadt | Los Angeles, CA | Bungalow Office

    Design Statement: "My office is a cozy 30 square feet, and was a tiny kitchen before I took over the unit next door and joined it to mine. We took out the countertops, kept the built-in cabinets, and unfortunately had to leave in the laminate flooring. I work from home so I was really excited to finally having a real office. I wanted to create a warm environment filled with some of my favorite objects, so I would want to spend time there. As a young professional with a mountain of student loan debt, I am always designing my house on a budget and gleaning objects from the different environments I find myself in. Other than my desk, I sourced everything for under $50. As much as I drool over designer pieces, I like the uniqueness of the spaces I create with my found objects: a crystal dug up in a garden, a sea worm shell from a walk on the beach, an old brass porthole found in the desert. In addition to that, there’s a lot of 'sidewalk shopping' and thrift-store hunting!"

    Chosen by: Guest judge and fashion designer Jenni Kayne, who said, "I could see myself happily working here. I love how simple, bright, and natural it feels. I am most inspired and relaxed when I'm in a clean, minimal space, but I also love being surrounded by beautiful things. All of the details in this space—from the plants to the family photos and heirlooms—felt thoughtful, balanced, and truly special."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Mirror from Anthropologie and straw hat from a thrift store.

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "The collection of framed photos and prints on the wall above my desk includes a print of my love (top left) that I had made by Artifact Rising, a snapshot of my grandmother in the 1940s, and a postcard of a horse."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "A faux sheepskin rug from Etsy for my vintage wire chair. White desk and jute rug from Overstock."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "I scored this wood shelf for $10 at a thrift store. It holds books, small ceramic pieces that I made, my found brass porthole, and plants."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "Odds and ends—the photo strip is of my dad in the early sixties."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "Woven wastebasket from Target, lucite drawers from Muji that's barely visible on left side of my desktop, a leather and gold mouse pad from Freshly Picked, and my puppy, Olive."

     


    Project 2

    Caitlin Long | San Francisco, CA | Office Shed

    Design Statement: "I converted this 100-square-foot backyard garden shed into an office space for late-night studying and early morning business calls. I paneled an existing concrete wall with cedar, installed a portable camping woodstove for coziness, and painted the remaining trim a dark gray."

    Chosen by: Jenni Kayne, who said: "I was drawn to this office immediately. I love the mixture of dark-painted wood walls and exposed cedar, as well as the warmth and coziness that the plaid pillows, sheepskin, and layered vintage rugs bring. I like the fact that the interior feels as if it's exactly what the exterior calls for."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: The west wall in Benjamin Moore Lead Gray, eggshell finish. Ikea wall sconce.

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Flea market art and a pillow handmade from Burberry wool.

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Cedar paneling and a Restoration Hardware leather chair. The Andy Davis poster is from Mollusk Surf Shop, in San Francisco.

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: The Burberry pillow is paired with a flea market vintage Pendleton pillow.

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Shed entrance.

     


    Project 3

    Corinne H. | Dartmouth, Canada | Converted Mudroom Office

    Design Statement: "The office area was created out of an old mudroom. We were able to rip up multiple layers of linoleum and plywood to expose 140-year-old original pine flooring. The computer and printer sit beside a window that’s over seven feet tall, so there's a lot of natural light. We decided to accent the computer area by painting the wall Benjamin Moore’s Galveston Gray. The hanging light is a modern black industrial piece, and there's a cool industrial light that also serves as a sculptural piece over an antique chair with a kilim seat and pillow. The antique oak fireplace mantle, found on Kijiji, was a perfect fit for the space. It was stripped to achieve the beautiful natural patina. The antique glass above the mantle adds even more character. We decided to tile the inside area of the mantle to give it an interesting look. The cube that sits below the mantle is a modern reference to fire. It can change color and adds a warm element to the room. It can also become a strobe disco cube for parties. Files are kept in an old Dutch pie cabinet. Finally, a passageway that had been closed off was opened up for better light and flow. This study is a unique and inspiring space to work in."

    Chosen by: Jenni Kayne, who had this to say about the project: "This office took me back to another time in the best way. I fell in love the minute I saw the old pine floors, which really set the tone. And while everything from the antique mantel to the cabinet to the corner chair catches your attention, I love how effortless and minimal the space feels."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

     


    Project 4

    Rebecca Hepburn | Vancouver, Canada | Home Office

    Design Statement: "My home office was designed to be a creative and clean space for work as an interior design student. The shelves are mounted at arm's reach, and goods such as pens and drafting tools are accessible. A mixture of boxes are organized so that my reference materials and odds and ends can be stowed away but aren't so out of sight that I forget about them. It was important that the boxes have lids to maintain the clean lines and organized look and feel of the space. The desk is the focal point, and I wanted to make sure that it's well displayed and that the surface is kept open for drawing and drafting. The desk is a special piece that my husband and I had locally made after selecting black walnut slabs dried for five years from a nearby farm. I look forward to seeing how the wood matures and naturally wears, and expect it will become more beautiful with age. Living in Vancouver, we see our fair share of gray and rainy days, so I wanted to make sure to freshen and brighten the area with greenery, which is such a complimentary contrast to the white walls and objects in the room. With Vancouver’s lighting and robustly green landscape, bringing green into the home and workspace feels like a natural fit."

    Chosen by: Remodelista editor in chief Julie Carlson, who commented: "Rebecca achieved a nice modern/organic balance in her home office. I love the live-edge black walnut desk paired with the crisp white shelves; everything is in its place, but the space doesn't feel too perfect or over designed."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

     


    Project 5 

    Jane C. | Waban, MA | Light-Filled New England Office

    Design Statement: "We transformed our dilapidated, three-season sunroom into a flexible, indoor-outdoor office space. We went for a clean, Scandinavian-influenced look inside, and a modern, New England look outside."

    Chosen by: Julie Carlson, who said: "Lighting is so important in a workspace, and this home office is flooded with natural light, which encourages creativity, in my opinion. I like the simplicity and modesty of the space, and the fact that Jane repurposed her childhood desk chair. And I'm all for rooms that serve a dual purpose; this one manages to be an office by day and a media room by night, keeping the TV out of the main living space—one of my pet peeves."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: An exterior view of the office.

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: The office door opens onto a small deck with a built-in planter.

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "Windows are on three sides of the room overlooking our garden. At night, the office becomes a media room."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "Close-up of my desk, with works in progress on the wall."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "To make the small space feel airy, we opened up the ceiling and stained it white."

    Best Amateur Office Space Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "My desk area. I chose the Helix desk from CB2 for its openness and clean lines; the chair is my desk chair from childhood."

    Start voting—and vote daily, now through August 8, on both Remodelista and Gardenista. Winners will be announced on August 9.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    London's "it" florist Hattie Fox moved her Shoreditch studio, That Flower Shop, from a nearby former blacksmith's digs to a street-front shop at the new Ace Hotel. We can see why.

    Ace Hotel in Shoreditch, London | Remodelista

    Above: To see more of the Ace's signature Pacific Northwest grunge-industrial vibe, go to our post Design News: Ace Hotel Opens in Shoreditch. Photograph by Mark Leary, via Flickr.

    That Flower Shop in the Ace Hotel, Shoreditch | Remodelista

    Above: Florist Hattie Fox, known as "That Flower Girl" in London, has an eclectic client list. Fox designed headpieces for a Wall Street Journal fashion spread (no, that's not an oxymoron), planted the VIP area at Wimbledon, and maintains the container gardens on her clients' Shoreditch rooftops. Photograph via Stamp.

    That Flower Shop in the Ace Hotel, Shoreditch | Remodelista

    Above: Fox got her start working for her dad's landscape design business; now she arranges flowers for weddings, delivery, and passersby. Photograph via Flowerona.

    That Flower Shop in the Ace Hotel, Shoreditch | Remodelista  

    Above: When asked by Flowerona to describe her style, Fox responded: "Organized chaos: I like to keep things as raw and natural as possible, with lots of berries, seed pods, and British foliage." Photograph via Stamp.

    That Flower Shop in the Ace Hotel, Shoreditch | Remodelista

    Above: Grown on a rooftop in Shoreditch. Photograph via That Flower Shop.

    That Flower Shop in the Ace Hotel, Shoreditch | Remodelista

    Above: Follow the cobblestones to Fox's shop. Photograph via That Flower Shop.


    View Larger Map

    Headed to London? Visit more of our favorite UK Florists, Hotels, Restaurants, Shops, and Gardens.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    My accommodations in architecture school came with windows but no window treatments. Living on a student budget, I did nothing, a solution that suited me just fine—the purist in me strongly believed that windows should be allowed to do their job of letting light in unfettered by the messiness of curtains or the clutter of Venetian blinds. And then one day a friend pointed out that while I may be comfortable exposing myself for the sake of architecture, those with a view into my room at night might not feel the same way. The owner of the local hardware store suggested roller blinds. I installed them myself—my first DIY—and have been committed to their simple effectiveness ever since. Read on to see why roller blinds have been my one and only window treatment everywhere I've lived.

    What is a roller blind?

    A roller blind is a rectangular swath of material attached to a wooden dowel or metal tube, and mounted between two brackets. A chain pulley system or a spring mechanism rolls the fabric up and down. Automated roller blinds are available, but automation seems to unnecessarily complicate things. That said, hanging cords and loops present a bona fide hazard in house's with young kids; read this New York Times report on the subject before selecting the right model for you.

    Ikea Enje Roller Blind | Remodelista

    Above: The Ikea Enje Roller Blind filters light and reduces glare on computers and televisions; it's available in a variety of sizes. The Enje Roller Blind UK comes with a pulley cord and is priced at £14 to £22, while the Enje Roller Blind US comes cordless for increased child safety, $17.99 to $34.99.

    Why are roller blinds my favorite window treatment?

    I like for the dimensions of my windows to be fully exposed, and in their open position, roller blinds disappear in a way that curtains, shutters, Venetian blinds, and Roman shades never do. And when I have to lower them, roller blinds have a visual consistency that allows them to become part of the architecture as opposed to an added layer of decoration. Though, conversely, curtains can add a grandeur that shades lack, and they can keep out drafts. 

    Sheer roller Blinds in white living room | Remodelista

    Above: Simple roller blinds in a white setting become part of the architecture. In a room with a series of same-size windows, roller blinds lined up at the same height appeal to those of us who appreciate precision. Image via DBA Blinds.

    How much light can roller blinds let in or block out?

    There are scores of roller blind fabric options, from sheer to opaque, to provide the degree of control you're after. In our house in London, we wanted two extremes: to let in as much light in as possible during the day but to black out all early morning light. We needed blinds on all our windows because on the street front we have a privacy issue, and throughout the windows cause computer glare. For visual consistency, we chose the same sheer fabric for all windows, and our solution in the bedrooms was to install a double roller blind with sheer fabric on one roller and a blackout shade on the other.

      Double roller blinds | Remodelista

    Above: Double roller blinds are used to cover a wall of windows: During the day, sheer blinds filter and diffuse the light coming in, while blackout blinds keep the room dark at night. Image via Ati Shutters and Blinds

    Double roller blind hardware | Remodelista

    Above: On a double roller blind, two rollers can accommodate two different fabrics, allowing sheer and blackout options. Image via Sunlight.

    What type of settings do roller blinds work well in?

    In their simplicity, roller blinds have a neutral appearance and go with all styles of decor, from traditional to contemporary. They can be mounted a number of ways: in between the window frames (but beware that some light may leak in from the sides), in front of the window frames, or even from the ceiling. The mounting options, of course, depend on your existing conditions. When roller blinds are mounted between the frames, the windows stand out; if they're mounted in front of the window frames, they typically mask the frames; and a ceiling mount can make a room feel taller.

    Sheer roller blinds in traditional window frames | Remodelista

    Above: The roller blinds have been mounted to the underside of these traditional wooden window frames; when rolled up, the shades form a barely noticeable horizontal line. Image via Solid Frog.

    Sheer roller blinds in white diining room, white ceiling pendants | Remodelista

    Above: This modern setting has a roller blind that's been mounted to roll down and fully cover the window and its frame. Image via Slijkhuis-Interieur.

    Do roller blinds require upkeep?

    It's recommended that roller blinds be cleaned once a year (curtains, because they harbor dust mites, require more frequent cleaning—three to four times a year depending on how prone your family is to allergies). Cleaning roller blinds is relatively straightforward: Remove them from their brackets, roll them out on the floor, and towel them off with a mild cleaning solution. Curtains, on the other hand, need to be dismantled, washed, and pressed—or dry-cleaned—and then remounted. In my time-pressed schedule, maintaining roller blinds doesn't fill me with nearly dread that cleaning curtains does, increasing the likelihood that it may happen.

      Cleaning Venetian Blinds | Remodelista

    Above: The process of cleaning each individual blade of a Venetian blind rules them out for me. Image via The Blinds Review.

    How much do roller blinds cost and where can I get them? 

    Roller blinds come in a wide range of sizes and prices, from ready-made versions you install yourself to designs that are made to measure. At Home Depot, a Bali Cut-to-Size White Light Filtering Vinyl Roller Shade costs 50 cents a square foot, while made-to-measure roller blinds from Levolor, The Shade Store, and Smith & Noble cost around $9 to $15 a square foot, depending on fabric and accessories. The Shade Store offers trained installers who will come to your house to measure and later hang your shades at an additional cost—Margot tried this and was happy with the results. Well-known brands such as Levolor and Hunter Douglas may be ordered online or through window covering specialists in your area. In the Bay Area, Julie uses Burris Window Shades.

    Roller Shade Recap

    Pros

    • A clean look that becomes part of the architecture.
    • More cost-effective than curtains.
    • Easier to clean and maintain than other window treatments.

    Cons

    • Roller blinds with cords present a safety hazard for young kids.
    • Not as effective as curtains at keeping out drafts.
    • When installed between window frames, a bit of light seeps in through the tiny gap between the blind and the frame.
    • Less formal or elegant than curtains.

    For more window treatment ideas, see Five Ways to Cover 50 Windows on a Budget. And, on Gardenista, learn The Secret Ingredient to Make Windows Shine Bright Like a Diamond. Contemplating a remodel? Have a look at all of our Remodeling 101 posts.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on March 6, 2014, as part of our Velvet Underground issue. 

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    A find from LA designer and world traveler, Cynthia Carlson: Lokal in Mitte, Berlin.

    German Maren Thimm and her American partner, Gary Hoopengardner, had initially set up a temporary restaurant called Kantine in the courtyard of British architect David Chipperfield's Berlin office (with the promise that Chipperfield could always get a seat). Then two years ago, Chipperfield received permission to build on his firm's lot, so the couple took Kantine's floorboards with them and opened Lokal, a permanent cantine serving locally sourced ingredients. 

    Photography by Cynthia Carlson, except where noted. 

    Lokal Restaurant in Berlin, Germany | Remodelista

    Above: Mismatched chairs at a recycled wood table made by German architect Katja Buchholz. Photograph via Lost In Cheeseland.

    Lokal Restaurant in Berlin, Germany | Remodelista

    Above: The painted tabletop. For variations on this theme, see Five Favorites: Tables Transformed by Stencils.

    Lokal Restaurant in Berlin, Germany | Remodelista

    Above: Tapered glass pendant lights hang over more tables designed by Buchholz. Hoopengardner himself finished the whitewashed walls and stone flooring and painted a group of chairs white.

    Lokal Restaurant in Berlin, Germany | Remodelista

    Above: Open shelves behind the counter display Lokal's own preserves.

    Lokal Restaurant in Berlin, Germany | Remodelista

    Above: For big groups, tables are pushed together and neatly surrounded by white chairs. Photograph via Lost In Cheeseland.

    Above: Live piano music, which had been a popular feature at Kantine, has carried over to Lokal, where an alcove is just big enough for an upright.  

    Lokal Restaurant in Berlin, Germany | Remodelista

    Above: Mismatched chairs add a casual note. Photograph via Foodie in Berlin.

    Lokal Restaurant in Berlin, Germany | Remodelista

    Above: Fur throws and candles add warmth. For more information, go to LokalPhotograph via Foodie in Berlin

    If you like the look of Lokal, see our Reclaimed Wood archive, and for similar chairs, consider The Windsor Chair Revisited. Heading to Germany? Allow our City Guides to lead the way.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on October 11, 2012, in our Oktoberfest issue.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Last spring Gardenista spotlighted the Blueberry Café, a combination shop, restaurant, and wedding venue in the KwaZulu-Natal midlands of South Africa. The unusual setup had been given a makeover by Anatomy Design, and one of my favorite new details is the cafe's hanging plant baskets suspended from a glass atrium. Modeled on vintage vegetable baskets, the planters manage to be playful and whimsical without feeling twee. They've got me plotting a DIY version, and I've rounded up the goods to re-create the look.

    Above: Hanging wire planters at the Blueberry Café. Photographs by Samantha Maber.

    Above: For starters, a 12-inch Traditional Coco Basket comes with a molded coco fiber liner that can easily be removed; $5.93 at Home Depot.

     

    Above: To re-create the coppery shine of the wall-mounted planters and copper lights hanging throughout the store, I'd use a metallic spray paint. An 11-ounce bottle of Rust-Oleum's Metallic Spray, Copper is $11.27.

    Above: I prefer the clean lines of the wire hangers used in the Blueberry Café design, so I'd remove the chains from my hanging basket and replace them with 20-Gauge Hobby Wire; $14.12 at Tool King.

     

    Above: To complete the clean look, I'd use aluminum wire Crimping Sleeves to secure the wires to the basket; 50 for $6.84 on Amazon.

    Above: The multipurpose Leatherman Super Tool is handy to have around for all sorts of craft projects, and it includes a wire crimper tool; $69.99 at Amazon.

    Above: The cafe's hanging wire planters hold what appear to be small astilbe starts still in their nursery pots. Two of my favorite astilbes are the Astilbearendsii Peaches and Cream and Astilbechinensis Serenade; both $8.95 (and seasonally available) at Bluestone Perennials.

    What do you think? A passable hack or a DIY project with potential to go haywire?

    Not convinced that metallic spray paint would do the trick? See Izabella's recent Remodelista DIY: The $7 Pendant Light Redo featuring a faux brass finish.

    Prefer not to go the DIY route? Browse our featured Hanging Planters on Gardenista.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    The classic German beer garden table is more versatile than you might think: It can function as a desk, craft table, and dining table, and is especially ideal for narrow apartment spaces. Here are five smart ways these outdoor tables have been put to use indoors.

    Where can you buy a biergarten table? Oktobefest Haus offers an authentic Biergarten Folding Wood Table and Bench Set for $479.99.

    Above: A classic biergarten table in the dining room of a Scandinavian-inspired UK home. Photograph by Simon Eldon for Heart Home Magazine, spotted on Desire to Inspire.

    Above: An antique biergarten table is the gathering place in the Brooklyn apartment of director and photographer Poppy de Villeneuve. Photograph by Sam Horine for Refinery 29.

    Above: A German beer table is used in an indoor/outdoor living space by Melbourne designer Shareen Joel of Shareen Joel Design and Share Design.

    Above: London shop owner Amanda Cox uses a painted biergarten table as a desk; see more at Secrets of an Urban Sleuth, London Edition.

    Above: Justine Glanfield, a designer at children's clothing company Cotton and Milk, uses a biergarten table in her arts and crafts area. Photograph via Milk Magazine. Looking for an excuse to set up an at-home art studio for yourself and your children? See our wellness guru Jackie Ashton's 10 Reasons to Craft with Kids.

    For more indoor-outdoor designs, see Steal This Look: Biergarten Table Setting and our recent 10 Easy Pieces roundups: Folding Dining Tables and Folding Chairs.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on October 15, 2012, as part of our Oktoberfest issue.

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    In Berlin's artsy Neuköllna neighborhood, an über-cute hostel awaits the adventuresome.

    Huettenpalast owners Silke Lorenzen and Sarah Vollmer set out to create a business where they could fully exercise their passions for design, art, cooking, and socializing. They found a home base in a former vacuum cleaner factory and soon started dreaming of rooms within rooms.

    Huettenpalast now welcomes visitors to its six creatively refurbished campers and cabins nestled closely together in an indoor campground, replete with birch trees, picnic tables, and lanterns. Bedrooms are private but bathrooms are shared. Lorenzen and Vollmer host what they describe as "wild mix in generations and nationalities," and the two often join guests in the evenings over a bottle of wine. If privacy is a priority for you, Huettenpalast also offers six hotel rooms that the owners say are "really quiet." To book, visit Huettenpalast.

    Photography by Jan Brockhaus.

    Huttenplast Hotel in Berlin, Germany | Remodelista

    Above: The Kischwester (or "Little Sister"), a 1970's Mercurial Junior that came from East Germany. The yellow lightbox atop the camper supplies a starry night sky (pictured below).

    Above: The interior of the Kischwester was designed by Yoraco Gonzalez, who lined it with handmade wooden bricks. Kischwester's nighttime sky is strewn with flowers, seahorses, and musical notes amid the stars.

    Above: Huettenpalast's vegetarian cafe is open to guests and nonguests alike for breakfast, lunch, and afternoon tea; dinner service is in the works.

    Above: The cafe bar is built from discarded glass blocks that Lorenzen and Vollmer found in the building.

    Above: The cabins and caravans are all close neighbors. From left, the Alterpalast, Kischwester, Berghuette ("Mountain Cabin"), and Talhuette ("Valley Cabin").

    Above: The Schwalbennest caravan (or "Swallow's Nest"), built in the 1960s, is the only West German camper of the bunch.

    Above: The Heartbreaker needs no translation.

    Above: Each unit features its own "patio" lounge area.

    Above: Once a storage space for factory refuse, the garden makes good use of reclaimed bathtubs and old furniture.

    Berlin seems to lead the pack in novelty overnight digs: See The Urban Rental: Berlin's Most Aquatic Accommodation. Go to our City Guide to see more of our Berlin discoveries, including A Hotel Built from Salvaged Materials and, on Gardenista, A Moveable Feast: Berlin's Portable Garden.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on April 30, 2012, as part of our Beyond Bauhaus week.

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    Shortly after Abby Weintraub and Matt Manfredi bought their 1941 Hancock Park house, they watched it gobble up their savings: a new roof, furnace, pipes, wiring, and air conditioning filled their punch list. All other remodeling would have to wait—or would it? Faced with a cramped kitchen last touched in 1984 by Laura Ashley lovers, Abby and Matt waved an SOS sign and architect Barbara Bestor came to their rescue.

    Bestor didn't flinch at their request for a total transformation on a relative shoestring. Instead she took a look around the house, which Abby terms "Hollywood Georgian," and made some masterful room reassignments. She designated the unneeded formal dining room as the family room—the couple have two young kids and a casual, all ages approach to entertaining. Meanwhile, a small den morphed into the dining room, and by taking down a wall between it and the kitchen, Bestor created an open-plan cooking and eating setup that makes both spaces feel bigger and brighter.

    Lastly, she oversaw a gut renovation of the kitchen itself, mindful of Abby and Matt's desire for a clean, high-functioning setup that looks at home in a period house: "We took the elements of a lovely 1940s kitchen and rebuilt them for now," Bestor says. The couple—Abby is a graphic designer specializing in books; Matt is a screenwriter and an avid cook—are East Coast transplants who thoroughly appreciated the new old-fashioned details and practicality. "Barbara is known for her California look, but she grew up in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and she has a real New England sensibility," Abby says.

     Photography by Jessica Comingore for Remodelista.

    Bridge faucet and Carrara marble counter in Barbara Bestor kitchen, Remodelista

    Above: Barbara Bestor preserved the kitchen's original steel-framed casement windows and added more. This one is new—it came from Torrance Steel Window Co.—and opens up views to the expansive backyard. "It's true that steel windows are more expensive than wood," Bestor says, "but they offer a very different effect in important ways: the size of the mullions, flat profile, and continuity with the period of the house." As for the kitchen faucet, after a long hunt for the right design that wouldn't take months to arrive, Abby found their Axor Montreaux bridge model by Hansgrohe on Amazon. 

    Barbara Bestor classic kitchen design, Remodelista

    Above: Instead of a space-hogging island, the new kitchen has a Carrara-marble-topped peninsula that serves as a breakfast counter and holds a six-burner Aga stove (surprisingly less expensive, the couple found, than the equivalent from Viking or Wolf). The FlowerPot Pendant Light is a 1969 Verner Panton design from LA's A+R Store that comes in 10 colors.

    Barbara Bestor LA dining room, Remodelista

    Above: The kitchen is open to the new dining room carved out of what had been a tiny den with too many doors (some were closed up and all remaining door frames got streamlined). The bentwood Bento Chairs are by Swedish group Form Us with Love and came from the A+R Store.

    porthole window in Barbara Bestor designed dining room, Remodellista

    Above: On a dining room wall, Bestor inserted a porthole window that frames the dining room's Tom Dixon Bronze Copper Shade Pendant and provides a glimpse of the backyard from the front foyer. "I wanted to create a visual connection with the outside, but a traditional window would have looked like a mistake," Bestor says. "The circle reads like a mirror and preserves a sense of privacy. It's more Magic Castle than Barcelona Pavilion."

    black mantel stillife with Duncan Hannah painting, Remodelista

    Above: A detail of a ship painting by Duncan Hannah rests on the mantel, the lone feature from the den that was preserved. Barbara Bestor-designed white kitchen cabinets, Remodelista

    Above: White-painted poplar cabinets were designed to look, as Bestor puts it, "sort of old-new." The upper cabinets have glass fronts that lend a lightness and prevent the tight space from feeling crowded. In keeping with the traditional look, the counter is polished Carrara marble. 

    White kitchen cabinets with square craftsman knobs, Remodelista

    Above: Faceted Mission/Arts + Crafts Wooden Cabinet Pulls were sourced from Nice Knobs. 

    Steel framed kitchen windows, Remodelista

    Above: The steel-framed windows are painted Black Bean from Dunn-Edwards Paints.

    Outsized subway tiles in Barbara Bestor kitchen, Remodelista

    Above: The walls are tiled in outsize subway tiles—6-by-12-inch Northern Lights tiles in Dover White from Mission Tile West.

    Barbara Bestor small white kitchen remodel, Remodelista

    Above: A washer and dryer are sequestered at the far end of the kitchen, where they're on hand but not visible from most views. The oak flooring matches the original floors in the rest of the house. Architect and owners both credit the final success of the remodel to the work of the crew headed up by contractor David King of DTK Builders, in Los Angeles.

    Barbara Bestor designed ktichen desk and microwave niche, Remodelista

    Above: Whenever anything was deemed too expensive, Bestor pulled a new trick out of her bag. This desk is made from Ikea dark butcher block sanded and stained to look like teak. "It's one of the most commented-on features in the kitchen," Abby says. "Everyone loves the wood and asks what it is." The cabinet above it has a built-in nook for a microwave. 

    Barbara Bestor kitchen with outsized subway tiles, Remodelista

    Above: A detail of the Carrara-topped counter.

    Barbara-Bestor-LA-kitchen-remodel

    Above: The peninsula that extends from the counter is detailed with a bookshelf for cookbooks.

    Barbara Bestor-LA-kitchen-remodel

    Above: The fridge—a 48-inch Kitchen Aid—stands discreetly at the back of the kitchen. See our posts How to Choose a Refrigerator and 10 Easy Pieces: Built-In Refrigerators for ideas.

    Before-view-Barbara-Bestor-Kitchen

    Above: A glimpse of the setup B.B.B.—Before Barbara Bestor.

    Black painted back stairs with yellow handrail, Remodelista

    Above: Formerly sectioned off behind closed doors, Bestor opened up the back stairs. They're painted a glossy black and outfitted with a pole banister in Benjamin Moore Bumble Bee Yellow—no-nonsense New England, points out Abby, with a hit of sunny California.

    The other room that Abby and Matt tackled with Bestor's help is the master bath—see Steal This Look: A Barbara Bestor–Designed Master Bath in LA. More kitchen takeaway? Browse our Kitchen Gallery for inspiration and advice. Thinking of doing away with your dining room? Read Michelle's Gardenista post, The Death of the Dining Room.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on August 19, 2013, as part of our issue The Summer Kitchen.

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    It's a challenge picking the perfect kitchen faucet. Who knew? My husband and I looked at endless options during our recent remodel. We narrowed down the choices to two German designs: the Grohe Concetto Faucet and the Dornbracht Tara Logic Single-Level Basin Mixer. One at $376.35, the other at $1,656. Which one won us over? If money were no object, our top choice would have been the Dornbracht, but we went with the Grohe. After all, the products are almost identical.

    Grohe Concetto Faucet in Izabella's Kitchen

    Above: We installed a Grohe Concetto Faucet in our kitchen; $376.35 from eFaucets. It's available in super steel (our choice) and in polished chrome.

    Tara Logic Faucet, Remodelista

    Above: The Dornbracht Tara Logic Single-Level Basin Mixer, a modern classic, is $1,656 at Faucet Supply. 

    Looking for the perfect kitchen faucet? For more of our favorites, see Janet's 10 Easy Pieces: Editors' Favorite Faucets. And if you like German-engineered products, check out Why I Love My Miele Vacuum.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran May 2, 2013.

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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote for the finalists in each of 17 Considered Design Awards categories, on both Remodelista and Gardenista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 8.

    In the Best Bath Space/Professional category, our five finalists are WE Design, Etelamaki Architecture, Medium Plenty, Steven Harris Architects and Rees Roberts & Partners, and Schappacher White Architecture D.P.C. 

    Project 1

    WE Design | Brooklyn, NY | Greenpoint Townhouse Bathroom

    Design Statement: "The design of this townhouse renovation focuses on the integration of salvaged materials. Exposed copper piping in this half bathroom helps to reinforce the reclaimed and repurposed look. Combined with a vessel sink and gold-framed mirror, the look is eclectic yet elegant and curated. The details are consistent with the overall approach to the renovation—using off-the-shelf items paired with custom detailing from reclaimed materials."

    Chosen by: Guest judge and design journalist Suzanne Slesin, who commented: "This is a successful use of reclaimed materials to update a bathroom. What I like: the straightforward rectangular porcelain sink that sits on the long—very convenient—counter, the matching shelf that is set off the floor for easy overall maintenance of the bathroom, the high-tech look of the exposed copper pipes, the gray subway tile grout that creates a subtle yet graphic look, and the use of the vintage mirror on the door—the latter elements give a sense of place and act as counterpoints to the modern fixtures."

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: A view into the half bath showing exposed piping, salvaged door, and wood timber vanity.

     


    Project 2

    Etelamaki Architecture | Brooklyn, NY | South Brooklyn Townhouse Bathroom 

    Design Statement: "Located on the top floor of a wood-frame townhouse in South Park Slope, Brooklyn, this master bathroom is connected to the adjacent master bedroom by an oversize doorway with a steel and glass sliding door that, when fully open, blurs the boundaries between the two rooms and creates an interconnected space. The fixtures are placed around a nonfunctional brick chimney and “hearth” focal point. The toilet is contained in its own private compartment."

    Chosen by: Remodelista editor in chief Julie Carlson: "I love the mix of materials in this project: the original brick wall, the modern tub, the DIY Lindsey Adelman brass chandelier, the strip of wood used as a mount for the tub faucetry. It's a modern functional space, but with plenty of character."

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

     


    Project 3

    Medium Plenty | San Francisco, CA | Cow Hollow Bathroom

    Design Statement: "A new bathroom designed for an art collector. The goal was to create a light and muted palette while still integrating texture. The photograph of the diver is from the owner’s collection and was reproduced directly onto the cabinetry."

    Chosen by: Julie Carlson, who said: "Open and airy, with subtly textured tile and a custom photo mural, this bathroom exudes understated glamour."

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Custom-printed photograph on millwork with vanity.

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: View of the steam shower and freestanding tub. Floor-to-ceiling tiles cover the entire wall.

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: A freestanding tub is positioned against a tile wall.

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: A detail of the Phenomenon tile, designed by Tokujin Yoshioka for Mutina.

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Detail of the Dechirer floor tile from Mutina, designed by Patricia Urquiola.

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Printed image over custom millwork. Operable cabinets appear as seams in the image.

     


    Project 4

    Steven Harris Architects and Rees Roberts & Partners | New York, NY | Upper East Side Townhouse

    Design Statement: "The master bedroom suite of this house is a procession of rooms that ends in this unexpected aerie. Stepping stones lead over a carpet of living moss to a shower underneath a vaulted skylight. Here the mundane ritual of taking a shower is elevated to the highest level. The moss and the flowering camellia shrub give the space the feel of a secluded garden, and even on cloudy days, sunlight pours in. The soapstone bath and white walls are solid, simple forms against the plantings and the glowing light, anchoring this otherwise ephemeral room."

    Chosen by: Suzanne Slesin: "I love the outrageous fantasy of the space. The light from the skylight, the feel underfoot of the moss, and the perfume of the camellia blossoms create a modern, year-round oasis."

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: This shower room blurs the boundary between indoors and out with its vaulted skylight, living moss carpet, and camellia tree.

     


    Project 5

    Schappacher White Architecture D.P.C. | Shelter Island, NY | Wallace K. Harrison Modern Historic Preservation 

    Design Statement: "In 1931, architect Wallace K. Harrison designed a summer-use extension to Aluminaire House adding a series of circles. The estate, listed on the National Register of Historic Places, represents the leading edge of the International Style. It has now undergone a complete restoration and expansion that honors the architect’s original design intent while satisfying the needs of a 21st-century family."

    Chosen by: Suzanne Slesin: "What I like is the simplicity and minimalism. The bathroom is a seamless and modern space that fits in perfectly with the notion of classical minimalism. The materials—wood, polished marble, chrome hardware— help create a calm and functional space."

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Vanity with ceiling-hung floating mirror.

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Best Professional Bath Finalist in 2014 Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Fireplace at bathtub.

    Start voting—and vote daily, now through August 8, on both Remodelista and Gardenista. Winners will be announced on August 9.

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    Urban gardeners, get growing. This week, Gardenista presents far more than trees sprouting in city settings.

    Julie Farris Brooklyn roof garden | Gardenista

    Above: Sophia explores Julie Farris's low-maintenance rooftop in Cobble Hill, and presents tips for creating a metropolitan meadow in Garden Designer Visit.

    Growing a kids' garden with Christine Chitnis | Gardenista

    Above: In Garden Visit, blogger Christine Chitnis of Providence, Rhode Island, details how to grow a kid-friendly urban vegetable garden—chickens (and end-of-the-day chicken wrangling) included.

    Steal This Look | Gardenista

    Above: Michele presents a black and white trellis garden that can be built from recycled pallets—see how in Steal This Look.

    DIY mosquito remedies |  Gardenista

    Above: A peppermint poultice is one of Erin's seven DIY remedies for taking the itch out of mosquito bites. Who knew? Tea bags also work.

    Antwerp garden designers Bart Haverkamp and Pieter Croes | Gardenista

    Above: In Radical Urban Gardens from Antwerp, Michelle introduces us to a pair of garden designers who specialize in delivering trees to apartments by crane and other whatever-it-takes green tactics.

    Tough perennials for urban gardens | Gardenista

    Above: Perennials that thrive just about anywhere, including the hellstrip—"the problem area between your sidewalk and the street"—are the subject of Justine's 10 Easy Pieces. Shown here, fragrant Gray Santolina or Lavender Cotton. We plan to commit the list to memory.

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    Drawn to the industrial loft look but concerned it might be too rough and open for you? See how LA's Simo Design helped their client remodel an open-plan setup to create a loft on a residential scale.

    “Our client liked the look of his local restaurants and shops in Venice, California; he gravitated to their informal and industrial aspects, but he also wanted a to live in a clean, more refined space,” says Alexi Renalls, cofounder of Simo Design. “The industrial style is appealing but doesn't always directly translate to the home. We were worried it would quickly become dated, and so we set out to interpret the look in a way that's less fleeting and more inviting." 

    Photography by David Gilbert

    American black walnut kitchen island by DM/DM and Sawkille oak stools in Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: The designers created a moveable kitchen island on wheels, lending flexibility to the open plan of the kitchen, dining, and living room. Concrete Heavy Light pendants from Decode London hang over the kitchen island.

    American black walnut kitchen island by DM/DM and Sawkille oak stools in Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: Horizontal and vertical subway-style tiles from Mission Tile West in South Pasadena form a clean-lined backdrop to the kitchen cabinets and open shelving. Sawkille Tall Stools sit on an engineered solid oak floor from Provenza Floors. For a primer on white subway tile patterns, see our recent Remodeling 101 post. And if you like the look of the stools, check out more of Sawkille's designs.

    American black walnut kitchen island by DM/DM in Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: "We collaborated with furniture designer David McCollough of DM/DM on the kitchen island, which is made of American black walnut," Renalls says. "The top is lacquered so that it can be used as a working surface." A Kohler Parq Faucet in an oil-rubbed bronze finish hints at an industrial aesthetic, while simple Belgian Sheer Linen Curtains from Restoration Hardware diffuse the strong Californian light.

    Jon Rou photograph, Workstead lamp in Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: A photograph by Jon Rou gives the living area a Venice Beach vibe.

    Fabric linen headboard with striped sheets and Hedge House bedside table in Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: A mix of striped bedding and cushions complements the washed linen headboard; a Solid Quarter Sawn White Oak Bedside Table by Hedge House adds a natural note to the assemblage.

    Black Cord Sconce, Brendan Ravenhill in Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: The designers kept the palette neutral when introducing key furnishings and accessories, including the master bedroom's Black Cord Sconces by Brendan Ravenhill and a midcentury chair and ottoman found through 1st Dibs. 

    Carrara marble slab vanity in Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: A double sink vanity made out of Carrara marble slabs is detailed to appear monolithic.

    Carrra marble tiles in Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: The wall tiles behind the bathtub were cut down from larger floor tiles to achieve the desired texture and pattern variation.

    Before

    Before image of Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: The open-plan kitchen, dining, and living area prior to the renovation.

    Before image of Venice apartment by SIMO Design | Remodelista

    Above: The pre-renovation master bedroom. 

    Simo Design, members of the Remodelista Architecture and Designer Directory, are professional remodelers. See their tips on getting the most out of your remodel with paint, and have a look at another of their projects, A Masculine Midcentury Revival in LA.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on September 23, 2013, as part of our issue The Nonchalant Kitchen.

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    Here's what's on our radar this week.

    Opening Ceremony in Shoreditch | Remodelista

    Bamboo Steamer on Quitokeeto | Remodelista

    • Above: On our wish list: Quitokeeto's new interpretation of the bamboo steamer
    • The new book Living in Style Ibizia offers an inside look at some of the island's most memorable houses.

    Kauffman Mercantile Extra Large Tote Sarah Lonsdale | Remodelista

    • Remodelista editor at large and markets director Sarah Lonsdale has teamed up with Kaufmann Mercantile to design the extra large (and extra sturdy), four-pocket canvas Market Tote for the vagabonds among us.

    Freunde von Freunden Stephanie Akkaoui's Apartment in Amsterdam | Remodelista

    • Above: Beirut-born, Amsterdam-based architect Stephanie Akkaoui Hughes takes Freunde von Freunden on a tour of her canal house.
    • 60 ways to update your rooms for next to nothing

    Scenes from the Kitchen via Food52 | Remodelista

    For more from this week on Remodelista, see Urban Escape, and don't miss Gardenista's week of city gardens

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    Come on over to our place. This week we're hanging out in the kitchen (the easy, breezy, produce-filled kitchen that feels like an oasis, that is). Join us for foraged bouquets, peak-season tabletop ideas, and, yes, inspired kitchen designs.

    Summery Kitchens Remodelista Issue

    Monday

    Jacob May cutting board from Quitokeeto | Remodelista

    Above: We have a weakness for cutting boards—and you will too after seeing Alexa's latest find in today's Kitchen Accessories post. Also, watch for Julie's roundup of Kitchen Storage Tricks stolen from the bathroom (hint: tiled soap niches aren't just for showers).

    Tuesday

    Louesa Roebuck qunce and thyme arrangement for Remodelista

    Above: In Tuesday's Floral Arrangements post, Bay Area renegade florist Louesa Robuck gathers some backyard bounty and shows us how to make her signature foraged bouquets. 

    Wednesday

    Eatrip in Japan  shot by Aya Brackett| Remodelista

    Above: This simple farm cafe in Tokyo—also shown in our cover image—is filled with kitchen design takeaway. Watch for Wednesday's Restaurant Visit. Photograph by Aya Brackett for Remodelista.

    Thursday

    SF Noe Valley kitchen remodel by Jute | Remodelista

    Above: A skillful overhaul (with Before and Afters): Thursday's Rehab Diary presents a small, closed-in kitchen turned open and airy. 

    Friday

    Hilary Robertson summer fruit tabletop for Remodelista

     Above: In Ask the Expert, star stylist Hilary Robertson—aka Mrs. Robertson—offers advice on setting an inspired summery table, no-fuss edition. Take a look at Hilary's new book.

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    Founder of the blog House Tweaking and mother of three, Dana Miller has a thing for renovating houses that she classifies as "underdogs." With two hands-on renovations under her belt, the former pharmacist and her husband, Steve, an engineer and DIY expert, opted for a simpler life when they traded their 2,700-square-foot McMansion for a 1,600-square-foot dilapidated 1950s ranch house in Cincinnati. “It was the worst house on the street,” she says. "It's not our dream house, but, rather, the house in which to pursue our dreams."

    Three years later the nearly completed project features a game-changing kitchen—Ikea cabinets included—that's the Miller family hub and, no doubt, one of the nicest rooms in the neighborhood.

    Photography by Dana Miller.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea Black Kitchen Cabinets. Tolix Stools | Remodelista

    Above: When the couple bought the house, the kitchen was enclosed and the ceilings were only eight feet high (scroll down for Before shots). Doing much of the work themselves, they began by removing the walls that separated the kitchen from the dining and living rooms, and during the process part of the plaster ceiling came down. Staring at the underside of the roof, Dana and Steve came up with the idea of introducing a vaulted ceiling and installing skylights, completely transforming the look of the space. 

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea Black Kitchen Cabinets, Tolix Stools | Remodelista

    Above: The new design is anchored by a nine-foot-long, walnut-topped island. Above it, Dana suspended a trio of clear Glass Globe Pendants from West Elm. "I wanted something that would punctuate the island but not impede the view of the kitchen from the adjoining living space," she says. Backless stools also help keep sight lines uninterrupted. The vaulted ceiling is paneled with tongue-and-groove pine.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea Ramsjö Black Kitchen Cabinets, White Subway Tile Backsplash | Remodelista

    Above: Dana knew that she wanted a "tuxedo" kitchen: dark lower cabinets to ground the space and white upper shelves and cabinets to keep things light. A vintage rug adds a layer of coziness.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea  Black Kitchen Cabinets | Remodelista

    Above: The kitchen is in constant use—that's Dana and her young daughter.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea Ramsjö Black Kitchen Cabinets, Red Persian Area Carpet on wood floor | Remodelista

    Above: The island's walnut counter provides a warm contrast to the Kashmir white granite counters in the rest of the kitchen. "The island sees as much Play-Doh, crafting, and homework as it does meal prep, entertaining, and casual dining," Dana says. "Guests always comment on the island and wood top, saying they feel like they’re at a bar. We take it as a compliment." The appliances are all from Ikea; the fridge is Ikea's Nutid model.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea Black Kitchen Cabinets, Tolix Stools | Remodelista

    Above: "I really wanted the kitchen to feel like an extension of the living space instead of a kitchen thrown into a living room," Dana says. "To achieve this, we continued the engineered hardwood flooring into the kitchen."

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea Ramsjö Black Kitchen Cabinets | Remodelista

    Above: The Ikea cabinetry is a mix of two styles: Ramsjö base cabinets and Lidingö solid and glass-fronted upper cabinets, both with Värde nickle-plated pulls. "We fell hard for the Ramsjö black-brown base cabinets, but were disappointed with the slightly pink tone of the coordinating white wall cabinets," Dana says. "In the end, we used three different door styles. I was a little worried about the mix on paper, but in actuality I think it goes a long way toward helping the kitchen feel less generic."

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Desk Space | Remodelista

    Above: One end of the kitchen serves as a home office. The base cabinets hold a printer, office supplies, and the kids’ crafting supplies. In the upper glass-fronted cabinets, Dana uses an assortment of baskets, bins, and boxes for storage.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea Ramsjö Black Kitchen Cabinets | Remodelista

    Above: On the back wall, to keep the room from feeling crowded, Dana introduced open shelves instead of upper cabinets. A sleek range hood and minimal backsplash add to the open feel, while all the wood notes lend warmth to the design.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea  Ramsjö Black Kitchen Cabinets, Tolix Stools | Remodelista

    Above: French doors—added in place of a window—connect the kitchen to the backyard. Learn all about French doors in our recent Remodeling 101.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Ikea Diagram | Remodelista

    Above: Dana worked closely with the staff at her local Ikea in Cincinnati to design the kitchen. See House Tweaking: "Installing Our Ikea Kitchen" for more.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Ranch House | Remodelista

    Above: The Millers' 1958 ranch house. "In 2011 we ditched our McMansion in our desire to live more simply," Dana says. "It's one of the best decisions we ever made."

    Before 

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Before Image | Remodelista

    Above: The kitchen was originally walled off from the living and dining areas. The brown shag carpeting (with termite trails) was one of the first things to go.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Before Image | Remodelista

    Above: A view of the kitchen looking toward the front door. "If the cabinets had been in better shape, we might have tried to work with them," Dana says.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Before Image | Remodelista

    Above: A view looking toward the dining area.

    House Tweaking, Dana Miller's Kitchen, Before Image | Remodelista

    Above: "One thing we liked about the kitchen was the window above the sink that looks out onto the backyard," says Dana. "We kept the sink in the same position." Go to House Tweaking: "The Kitchen" to see more.

    For more kitchen success stories, peruse our Rehab Diaries, including A Respectful Eichler Remodel in Marin. And if you're envying Dana's home office, see 10 Favorites: The Niche Workspace. Tuxedo kitchen admirers might want to try Gardenista's Steal This Look: A Black and White Deck, Herb Garden Included

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    In celebration of Remodelista's Considered Design Awards, we're partnering with Staub, a longtime Remodelista kitchen favorite, to give away a four-piece, cast-iron cookware set to five Remodelista readers. 

    Five lucky winners will receive: 

    • 12-inch grill pan.
    • 5 1/2-quart round cocotte (a Dutch oven) with lid.
    • 10-inch fry pan.

    How to enter: 

    • Starting today and continuing through August 8, vote for your favorite projects in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards.
    • After voting, visit this post to submit your email address below.
    • Winners will be selected in a random drawing, so participants may vote and submit their email address once a day until August 8 at 11:59 p.m. ET. 
    • Five winners will be chosen on August 9 and contacted through the email address provided. 

    Note: The sweepstakes is open to residents of the United States, United Kingdom, and Canada (excluding Quebec). For more details, see the official rules

    4-piece Staub Cookware Giveaway on Remodelista | Remodelista

    Above: The four-piece, cast-iron cookware set (a $500 retail value) is available in five colors: sapphire blue (shown here), graphite (shown below), basil (shown at bottom), emerald, and red. Each winner will receive a set in the color of his or her choice. Photograph courtesy of Staub. 

    Julie Carlson Pot Filler Faucet | Remodelista

    Above: Remodelista editor in chief Julie Carlson is a Staub devotee. Here's her 9-quart round cocotte in graphite. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista. 

    Clarisse Demory and Lucile Demory in Paris, Remodelista

    Above: Alexa visited designer Clarisse Demory's apartment in Paris and coveted her Staub collection. Here's Clarisse's oval cocotte in basil. Photograph by Alexa Hotz for Remodelista.

    After you've voted for your favorite spaces in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards, submit your email address below to enter the sweepstakes. Good luck!

    Please enter your email address to enter the sweepstakes.*
    Please enter a valid email address.
    *Required 

     

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    Our judges have selected the finalists, now you choose the winners. Vote for the finalists in each of 17 Considered Design Awards categories, on both Remodelista and Gardenista. You can vote once a day in each category, now through August 8.

    In the Best Amateur Living/Dining Space category, our five finalists are Alison Laxdal & James Hopper, Heather Jorde, Camille Eddera, Edmund Lam, and Theresa di Scianni.

    Project 1

    Alison Laxdal & James Hopper | Saskatoon, Canada | Home to Rest

    Design Statement: "As furniture designers, we spend our days helping clients improve their spaces. It's vital that we come home to a space that is relaxing, uncluttered, and functional. It's also a place for us to experiment with prototypes. Our rooms have changed many times over the years as designs improve. Our own furniture is mixed with my collection of vintage finds. When we travel, I love scouring shops for Scandinavian treasures. We both have Scandinavian heritage and it shows in our shared aesthetic. This room may not be original or edgy, but it feels great to be in it."

    Chosen by Remodelista editor in chief Julie Carlson, who commented: "Any interior featuring a Dala horse catches my attention—Scandinavian alert. I love the casual mix of midcentury pieces and the unfussiness of this space."

    Alison Laxdal & James Hopper Finalists in Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Alison Laxdal & James Hopper Finalists in Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Alison Laxdal & James Hopper Finalists in Remodelista Considered Design Awards

    Alison Laxdal & James Hopper Finalists in Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Alison Laxdal & James Hopper Finalists in Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Alison Laxdal & James Hopper Finalists in Remodelista Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Project 2

    Heather Jorde | Indianapolis, IN | Breakfast Nook Gets a Makeover

    Design Statement: "When we moved from New York to Indiana, I had high hopes of finding an older home with lots of character. While there were a lot of older options, none of them fit our requirements and price range, so we ended up with a newer home. I was ready for the challenge of making a cookie-cutter place unique. I found the chairs and hutch on Craigslist, bought a tulip table, and added a part-black accent wall. The matte black wall adds a lot of character to this corner of our house. In addition to being the family dining area, it's become one of my favorite spots for reading and emailing."

    Chosen by: Guest judge and graphic designer Luke Hayman, who said: "The mix of simple shapes—the black-and-white wall painting, floor tile, and tulip table—and the organic color and forms of the chairs and chest offer the feeling of an organized and serene space. I could easily sit there with a glass of wine and a good book."

    Heather Jorde Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "The light is from Ikea spray-painted a mint green—I love that subtle hint of color."

    Heather Jorde Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "The hutch is one of my favorite Craigslist finds. My husband added some supports in the back and introduced a new, sturdier shelf, but we were able to match the stain of the other shelves." 

    Heather-Jorde-Finalist-Remodelista-Considered-Design-Awards-2.jpg

    Above: "The chairs were another inexpensive Craigslist find."

    Project 3

    Camille Eddera | Los Angeles, CA | Living Room

    Design Statement: "The weather in California is so amazing all year long that I wanted a true indoor/outdoor living room. Bifold windows make this possible—the deck became a part of the living room."

    Chosen by: Julie Carlson, who said: "You can tell that an artist lives in this space; it's eclectic, interesting, and full of character and personality. I love the palette: the green velvet couch, and the ochre chair and settee, all against a unified white-painted background. I especially like the pale floor."

    Camille Eddera Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "The green velvet couch is from Organic Modernism on La Brea and the little orange couch is a vintage midcentury piece. The white table on the left is a vintage Knoll design."

    Camille Eddera Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "I designed the walnut coffee table and had it built by local wood artist Neil Rasmussen."

    Camille Eddera Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "The little midcentury couch was given to me as a gift. The round table and the little lamp are both from West Elm. Most of the paintings and drawings are from my painter mother, Emmanuelle Toesca."

    Camille Eddera Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: Bookshelves from Ikea.

    Camille Eddera Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Camille Eddera Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "The view from the yard. The deck has one large step that doubles as a sitting area."

    Project 4

    Edmund Lam | Montreal-West, Canada | Colonial Modern in Montreal-West

    Design Statement: "Our Montreal-West house was built in the colonial style in 1892 and updated by an Expo '67 architect in the late sixties. The resulting mix of midcentury and colonial is surprising yet perfectly intuitive. What you see here is the unique double living room that begins with the original space from 1892 and transitions into the 1960s addition that looks out onto the back deck. We wanted to complement the house's unique look by furnishing it with a mix of midcentury, industrial, antique, and homemade DIY and hacked Ikea pieces."

    Chosen by: Luke Hayman, who had this to say about the space: "A quirky mix of furniture and decorative styles creates an easy, casual space in which to relax and create."

    Edmund Lam, Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "The original 1892 section of the house is decorated in an eclectic style that combines midcentury, industrial, colonial, and DIY."

    Edmund Lam, Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Edmund Lam, Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "A DIY wood palette coffee table is set against a midcentury sectional couch."

    Edmund Lam, Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "An old Ikea floor lamp was spray-painted to complement the color palette."

    Edmund Lam, Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "A DIY Lindsey Adelman brass chandelier suspended from antique moulding sums up the theme nicely."

    Edmund Lam, Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards | Remodelista

    Above: "The old section of the house connects with a modern extension. We want the two spaces to complement one another but be unique."

    Project 5

    Theresa di Scianni | East Hampton, NY | Deep Six A-Frame

    Design Statement: "I love an A-frame; as challenging as they may be, they lift your spirits high. Before moving to the Springs [a small artist hamlet in the Hamptons], we lived in an A-frame in the hills of Los Angeles. My vision was to create a casual living environment that embodies California ease by introducing a bit of nature, treasures from our travels, magical fragrances, colorful textiles, and whatever else opens my heart."

    Chosen by: Luke Hayman: "I like the way the legs of the Eames chairs and the shape of the spiral stairs and stove pipe complement the extreme angles and structure of the A-frame, while the vintage chandelier, old rugs, and quilt add texture and color in a comfortable, inviting way."

    Theresa di Scianni: Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards

    Theresa di Scianni: Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards

    Theresa di Scianni: Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards

    Above: "Vintage Indian dowry blankets from Matta and a Jodhpur pouf."

    Theresa di Scianni: Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards

    Theresa di Scianni: Finalist in Remodelista's Considered Design Awards

    Above: "The art wall is filled to capacity—one of the trials of living in an A-frame house."

    Start voting, and vote daily, now through August 8, on both Remodelista and Gardenista. Winners will be announced on August 9.

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    Spotted (and admired) on the table at a recent dinner party: a sturdy, handmade butcher block with a patchwork-like pattern. The boards are the work of Dave Ball, owner of Oakland, California, design studio Jacob May. Using domestic wood from local lumberyards, Ball meticulously hand assembles end-grain tiles—wood cut at right angles to the grain—to form a solid surface. The benefit of using end-grain wood as a cutting board goes beyond aesthetics: The softness of the end grain helps to preserve knife edges. The boards are made of white oak or walnut and come in three sizes. They're available through Jacob May and Quitokeeto.

    Jacob May Cutting Board at Quitokeeto | Remodelista

    Above: The Small White-Oak Heirloom Cutting Board measures 16 inches by 9 inches and is 1 5/8 inches thick. It weighs in at a hefty 6 3/4 pounds; $300 at Quitokeeto.

    Jacob May Cutting Board at Quitokeeto | Remodelista

    Above: The short sides of the cutting boards are detailed with finger grooves.

    Jacob May Cutting Boards | Remodelista

    Above: The white oak boards in Large ($500), Medium ($400), and Small ($300) sizes. All come with a booklet explaining the benefits of end-grain wood and the simple care instructions.

    Jacob May Cutting Board at Quitokeeto | Remodelista

    Above: The Black Walnut Cheese Board measures 15 inches by 4 1/2 inches and is a collaborative piece exclusive to Quitokeeto; $120.

    Jacob May Cutting Board at Quitokeeto | Remodelista

    Above: Each board has a brass plug on the back embossed with the Jacob May emblem. The emblem is recessed just enough to use as a hanger.

    Jacob May Cutting Boards | Remodelista

    Above: The black walnut boards in Large ($500), Medium ($400), and Small ($300). The Small Black-Walnut Heirloom Cutting Board is also available at Quitokeeto.

    Can't have enough cutting boards? We know the feeling. See more of our favorites in 10 Easy Pieces: Display-Worthy Wooden Cutting Boards and 10 Easy Pieces: Wooden Cutting Boards with Cutouts for Hanging. Butcher block is also one of our favorite kitchen counter materials—and it's economical, too. Go to Remodeling 101 to learn if it's for you.

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    From towel bars to medicine cabinets repurposed as spice cabinets to recessed soap niches, here are 11 ideas for tidying up the kitchen.

    Medicine Cabinet in the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: A medicine cabinet over the kitchen sink provides storage for dish soap, sponges, and sink accessories in a renovated German farmhouse. Photograph by Benjamin Antony Monn for the New York Times.

    Martha Stewart Enamel Soap Dish in Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: Martha Stewart uses a wall-mounted soap dish to store kitchen brushes (see more at 15 Life-Changing Storage Ideas for the Kitchen).

    Recessed Soap Dish in Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: A soap niche in a tiled backsplash provides a handy storage spot. Photograph by Nicole Franzen.

    Elizabeth Roberts Soap Niche in Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: In a Carroll Gardens, Brooklyn, kitchen by Elizabeth Roberts of Ensemble Architects, a shower-like niche provides off-the-counter storage. Photograph by Dustin Aksland.

    Alistair Hendy Kitchen with Medicine Cabinet | Remodelista

    Above: A mirrored cabinet in Alistair Hendy's kitchen (see more at Revolution Road: A Groundbreaking Kitchen in London). Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista.

    Dean Isidro Kitchen with Soap Holder | Remodelista

    Above: A wall-mounted schoolroom soap holder in the Flanders, New York, kitchen of Dean Isidro (see more at Vote for the Best Kitchen in the Remodelista Considered Design Awards/Amateur Category). For sourcing ideas, go to Design Sleuth: Pro Ven Di Revolving Soap Holder.

    Towel Bar as Drawer Pull | Remodelista

    Above: In a kitchen in Visby, Sweden, by Leva Husfabrik, towel bars double as drawer pulls (see more at Design Sleuth: Towel Bars as Drawer Pulls).

      Wall Mounted Soap Dispenser in Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: A wall-mounted soap dispenser in the kitchen of Alina Preciado of Dar Gitane via the Kitchn. (for something similar, consider the Chrome Wall-Mounted Soap Dispenser from Habitat).

    Kitchen with Mirror | Remodelista

    Above: Kristan Cunningham and Scott Jarrell, owners of Los Angeles design firm Hammer and Spear, added a bathroom-like mirror to their kitchen to make it feel roomier. Photograph by Jessica Sample for Lonny.

    Devol Shaker Kitchen Drying Rack | Remodelista

    Above: In a Shaker-inspired kitchen in London by DeVol, a pulley-system drying rack (often used in English bathrooms and laundry rooms) provides an over-the-range venue for tea towels and kitchen accessories. See more at A Shaker-Inspired Kitchen in London and Object Lessons: The Sheila Maid Clothes Airer.

    Chinese Apothocary Drawers | Remodelista

    Above: Chinese apothecary drawers in a rustic kitchen.

    For more inspiration, browse our Kitchen Gallery, and have a look at our Trend Alert posts 11 Kitchen Islands Gone Glamorous and 10 Kitchens with Brass Accents.

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