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    If you grew up spending summers (and sometimes winters) in Wellfleet, it was normal to run into architectural giants like Serge Chermayeff at the grocery store, to sweep the floors of Lilian Saarinen's modernist cottage, to babysit Charles Zehnder's children, and to watch your mother drive off to a cocktail party in a Marimekko dress. It wasn't until later, when I was taking architectural history classes in college, that I realized how unusual the design scene was on the Outer Cape, where more than 100 modest modern holiday retreats were built over a 40-year span, merging Bauhaus ideals with New England fishing town building traditions.

    The catalyst for all this architectural innovation? Jack Hall, a Princeton grad and self-trained architect, who bought a 180-acre swath on Boundbrook Island in Wellfleet from Katie Dos Passos (the widow of John Dos Passos). Hall sold the land to friends (a 12-acre parcel to Chermayeff, for instance) and went on to design the Hatch Cottage for Robert Hatch, the then-editor of the Nation, and his wife, Ruth, an artist. The house—the setting for innumerable summer soirees—is available to rent; go to the Cape Cod Modern House Trust for information.

    Hatch House Exterior Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: The Hatch Cottage hovers above ground, perched on concrete pilings. Photo by Anna Moller via Kinfolk.

    Hatch House Living Room Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: A wood burning stove is set into a circle of beach stones. Photo by Anna Moller via Kinfolk.

    Hatch House Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: A built-in banquette with rattan chairs. Photo by Don Freeman via Artists' Handmade Houses.

    Hatch Cottage Living Room Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: A framed Matisse print, rice paper lantern, and vintage chair, design elements typical of modern houses of the era. Photo by Don Freeman via Artists' Handmade Houses.

    Hatch Cottage Living Room Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: Sliding doors connect the house to the beach and fill the room with sea air. Note the mismatched dining chairs; photo via the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.

    Hatch House Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: The tiny galley kitchen features open shelves, a common feature in modernist summer cottages. Photo by Don Freeman via Artists' Handmade Houses.

    Hatch House Fishing Lure Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: Fishing decoys as decor; photo by Anna Moller via Kinfolk

    Hatch House Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: Beach stones collected by Ruth Hatch. Photo via Salt Cellar Shop.

    Hatch Cottage Entry Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: A Bertoia chair positioned in the entry. Photo via the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.

    Hatch House Entry Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: A series of working shutters, operated by a rope and pulley system, allows the cottage to be closed off in winter. Photo via the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.

    Hatch House Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: A simple stone-edged path leads to the house. Photo via Salt Cellar Shop.

    Hatch House Porch Wellfleet | Remodelista

    Above: A deck overlooking the bay. Photo via the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.

    Hatch Cottage Wellfleet Exterior | Remodelista

    Above: Sunset at the Hatch Cottage. Photo via the Cape Cod Modern House Trust.

    Cape Cod Modern Book Cover | Remodelista

    Above: Interested in learning more? Order a copy of Cape Cod Modern: Midcentury Architecture and Community on the Outer Cape ($30 from Amazon), by Peter McMahon and Christine Cipriani.

    See a 1970 Charles Zehnder house that's part of the Cape Cod Modern House Trust (and also available for rent) in our post Pilgrim's Progress. On Gardenista, tour Architect Sheila Bonnell's Cape Cod Kitchen Garden.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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     Jasper Morrison calls his design philosophy "super normal," and describes it as a celebration of ordinary house objects. "Things which are designed to attract attention are generally unsatisfactory," Morrison says in the International Herald Tribune. "The objects that really make a difference to our lives are often the least noticeable ones, that don't try to grab our attention. They're the things that add something to the atmosphere of our homes and that we'd miss the most if they disappeared. That's why they're 'super normal.' " His PlateBowlCup line of sturdy bone china dinnerware for Alessi is a case in point and takes you from breakfast and lunch to dinner.

    breakfastmorrison2.jpg

    Above: A set of four Platebowlcup Dessert Bowls is $38 at A+R in Los Angeles.

    lunchmorrison.jpg

    Above: A set of four Platebowlcup Dinner Plates is $38 and a set of four Platebowlcup Soup Bowls is $38; both from A+R in Los Angeles. The Platebowlcup Salad Serving Bowl is $38.

    dinnermorrison.jpg

    Above: A set of four Platebowlcup Dinner Plates is $38 and a set of four Platebowlcup Soup Bowls is $38; both from A+R.

    Browse our Gallery of Rooms and Spaces for more Tabletop ideas. And on Gardenista, see 10 Easy Pieces: Outdoor Dining Plates.

    This post is an update; the original ran on June 16, 2008.

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    I like to see how other people store their kitchen knives. It's a detail I often zero in on when visiting a new kitchen or looking at photos of kitchens. Are the knives tucked away in a stealth in-drawer block? Or are they out in the open in a traditional countertop block, or suspended from a magnetic strip?

    Recently, I spotted a knife storage solution that, after hours of online searching, I realized is entirely bespoke: a leather knife rack mounted to the side of a kitchen island. I had to have one, so I made my own—and discovered that with a pliable piece of leather, it's a pretty simple thing to create. And you can tailor each loop in the rack to fit your own needs—no advanced knife skills necessary.

    DIY Leather Knife Rack for the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Materials

    • A piece of wood cut to the desired length. I used a 12-inch by 2-inch by 1-inch piece of poplar (choose a soft wood if you plan to use pushpins)
    • Leather hide, at least 14 by 7 inches (enough to generously wrap the entire piece of wood).
    • A handful of pushpins
    • Sandpaper, scissors, a hammer, and an awl (such as the General Tool 818 Scratch Awl; $4.34 from Amazon)

    Instructions

    DIY Leather Knife Rack for the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Step 1: Flip the piece of leather over so that the inside of the hide faces up. Place your sanded piece of wood on top and eyeball how you'll wrap it with the leather; measure, mark a pattern, and then cut to your liking.

    DIY Leather Knife Rack for the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Step 2: On each end of the wooden block, trim the leather so that it can be wrapped tightly against the wood. If your leather is on the thinner side, you can wrap the ends of the wood as you would a gift box, folding it over itself. If your leather is a thicker cut, as mine was, you'll want to make L-shaped cutouts so that you don't have unnecessary excess. If you're using soft wood and leather, you can secure each section with a simple pushpin. If the wood is hard and leather is thick, you'll want to puncture your leather with an awl and use a nail to create a hole before applying a pushpin.

    DIY Leather Knife Rack for the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Step 3: Once you've pinned down each end of the wood, fully wrap the block overlapping the leather on the side that won't show (and trimming as necessary). Secure the leather in place with a series of evenly spaced pushpins (I used three).

    DIY Leather Knife Rack for the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Step 4: Flip over the block to the display side. To create the knife holder, cut a strip of leather that is about one inch thick (or adjust as desired; leave extra length so that there's room for error). Pin down one end of the strip in the center of the block about an inch from the end.

    DIY Leather Knife Rack for the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Step 5: Push the leather against itself until it makes a loop. Secure the loop in place with a pushpin, and then continue making loops and pinning then down, adjusting each to your liking, until you've reached an inch from the end. Consider customizing your knife rack to your own set of knives and kitchen tools: I created one large loop to hold my kitchen scissors, and smaller, tighter loops for my knives.

    DIY Leather Knife Rack for the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Step 6: To mount the finished rack on the wall, there are a variety of options: you can hang it like a picture frame using a length of wire and a pushpins on the back, or you can nail the entire piece to the wall, or nail two sawtooth hangers on the back and hook them onto the wall (the approach I took).

    The Finished Look

    DIY Leather Knife Rack for the Kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: The knife rack hangs next to my stove for easy access to kitchen shears and paring knives. An alternative option is to nix the wooden block altogether and create an all-leather knife holster that hangs directly on the wall—something I hope to try in my next apartment.

    Photography by Alexa Hotz for Remodelista.

    What to do with leftover scraps of leather? Have a look at 10 DIY Projects Using Leather and Erin's recent DIY: Braided Leather Drawer Pulls. Looking for a place to store garden tools? On Gardenista, have a look at a Powder-Coated Steel Tool Rack

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    After working 10 years in IT, Pretoria, South Africa, native Zane Figueiredo decided to shift gears. He quit his job and enrolled in Pretoria's Pru Leith Chefs Academy, from which he graduated with distinction. After further honing his skills at some of the best restaurants in Cape Town, Figueiredo returned home to Pretoria, where, with the help of KA.AD Architects and Studio Number 19, he opened his own place, Ginger and Fig. Much like the artisanal menu, which Figueiredo describes as “small but with much attention to detail,” the design of Ginger and Fig is fresh, pared-down, and very inviting.

    Ginger and Fig Restaurant seating 2 by KA.AD arch and Studio 19, Remodelista

    Above: KA.AD (KA + Architecture and Design) of Pretoria was responsible for the design and styling of Ginger and Fig, which includes floors tiled in an outsize herringbone pattern, and custom furniture and lighting by Studio Number 19 in Johannesburg. (Learn more about herringbone and chevron floors in our Spot the Difference post.)

    Ginger and Fig Restaurant by KA.AD arch and Studio 19, Remodelista

    Above: The black and white interior is contemporary and spare but alive with geometric patterns. It's an appealing backdrop for Zane's updated comfort food, such as Eggs Royale, a hand-cut ribeye burger with secret sauce.

    Ginger and Fig by Marsel Roothman via THe Pretty Blog, Remodelista

    Above: Simple materials, including standard white tiles and wooden food bins (plus a friendly staff), add up to a very inviting counter. Photograph by Marsel Roothman. You can see more of Marsel's images and read more about Ginger and Fig at The Pretty Blog.

    Ginger and Fig Restaurant table by KA.AD arch and Studio 19, Remodelista

    Above: A spot for two with stools and Prouvé-esque lighting designed by Studio 19.

    Ginger and Fig 2 by Marsel Roothman via The Pretty Blog, Remodelista

    Above: The interior is peppered with bit of lush greenery. Image by Marsel Roothman via The Pretty Blog.

    Ginger and Fig with Zane Figueiredo by Marsel Roothman, Remodelista

    Above: Chef and owner Zane Figueiredo himself adheres to the black and white palette. Image by Marsel Roothman via The Pretty Blog.

    Ginger and Fig Restaurant dining by KA.AD arch and Studio 19, Remodelista

    Above: A wider view of the dining area reveals witty detailing by KA.AD, such as electrical wiring used to create a striped wall graphic.

    Ginger and Fig Restaurant goods by Studio 19, Remodelista

    Above: More details by Studio 19; the wire shelving echoes the grid pattern of the wall tiles.

    Ginger and Fig Restaurant counter by KA.AD arch and Studio 19, Remodelista

    Above: Materials and goods were locally sourced when possible and present a fresh take on industrial modern design. 

    N.B. Heading to Pretoria, Cape Town, or other parts of South Africa? Have a look at the posts in our South Africa Travel Guide. Gardenista, too, has some lively spots for you to visit, including the Hanging Seashell Gardens in Cape Town.

    Below: Ginger and Fig is located at Shop no 5, Brooklyn Centre, 751 Jan Shoba street (corner Lynnwood and old Duncan), Brooklyn, Pretoria.

    Ginger and Fig, So. Africa map

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    When we surveyed members of the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory for their favored roofing material, they readily responded. Did the recommendations vary: NO. Were we surprised: YES. Hands down, the go-to roofing material was standing seam metal. Here's the low-down on their choice.

    Tiina Laakonen house Amagansett Matthew Williams | Remodelista

    Above: A standing seam zinc roof on Tiina Laakonen and Jon Rosen's Hamptons compound featured in the Remodelista book; architects Tim Furzer and Nandini Bagchee worked closely with the Tiina and Jon on the design. Photograph by Matthew Williams for Remodelista.

    What is Standing Seam Metal?

    Standing seam metal roofs are made of metal panels that extend from the top of the roof to the eaves. Each panel has a high lip or rib running up each side. The ribs overlap and fit together, concealing the fasteners and creating raised seams (thus, the name) that are visible from top to bottom. Standing seam metal roofs are not new. On the contrary, this style of metal roofing was used as early as the mid 1700s, and became more common in the mid 1800s thanks to the increased availability of copper. Today, the most common metals used are steel, aluminum, and copper (the most expensive). 

    The Benefits:

    • Standing seam metal roofs are energy efficient, and reduce home energy costs especially in hot climates.
    • Sustainable: most metal roofing contains a significant amount of recycled content, and metal roofs are 100-percent recyclable.
    • Long lasting and durable (not to mention fire and wind resistant). While the upfront cost may be higher than composite shingles, metal roofing lasts upwards of three times longer (and maybe more). Most carry a 30- to 50-year warranty.
    • Lightweight, reducing load-bearing structural costs. Metal roofs can often be installed directly over an existing roof, eliminating removal and disposal expenses and waste. 
    • Metal roofs look trim and tidy, and are equally suited to barn-style, modern and traditional structures. 

    Above: At a cabin in Hansville, Washington, Rohleder Borges Architecture used a simple, gutterless, galvanized standing seam metal roof. The rainwater drips down to a bed of river rock below, providing storm water infiltration. Image by Cynthia Grabau Photography.

    Here's what the architects had to say:

    "Metal roofs are always a great, low-maintenance high-aesthetic option," says architect Andrew Borges. "We love metal for its crisp aesthetic and long-lasting functionality. Metal roofing has been around for quite some time and hasn’t really changed much in its application. The under layers have gotten more advanced, but in the end the metal itself is there for the ages—and recyclable when it has reached the end of its useful life." 

      

    Above: A historic Dutch colonial house in Ghent, New York, has an antique standing seam metal roof in black. Architect James Dixon matched the roofing material on the lower addition that his firm designed.

    "Our favorite standing seam metal roofs are galvanized aluminum and (when budget allows) copper," says architect James Dixon. "Not only do these look great, but they're extremely durable. Many of the old barns throughout the Northeast have these roofs, and when I redid my 18th century farmhouse, it was my top choice. Because of its durability, metal roofs make a great green choice. Shake roofs are lovely, but the material available today only lasts about ten years or so, compared to thirty-plus for metal."

     

    Above: Metal roofing can be partnered with existing shake or composite roofs. Here, a porch with a galvanized aluminum standing seam metal roof stands below a shingled roof. James Dixon notes that standing seam metal are a great choice for porches, which often have flatter pitches: "the snow just slides right off." 

    Above: Todd Hansen of Albertsson & Hansen in Minneapolis uses a variety of materials for roofing, including Galvalume or Bonderized standing seam metal roofing, as shown in this cabin on Cable Lake in Wisconsin. The firm also uses asphalt and metal in combination, applying the metal to the low pitched area.

    In areas where heat is a consideration, like California's wine country, seamed metal roofing is the first choice for architect Amy Alper. Metal roofing reflects sunlight, preventing the roof from absorbing heat into the house, and, as a result, less energy is required to cool the indoor space. 

     

    Above: Lake Flato Architects of San Antonio often use standing seam metal roofs (as pictured in this Pine Ridge cabin) because they're long lasting, require little maintenance, and are available in a wide range of material options: in addition to the familiar steel, aluminum, and copper, these include weathered steel and zinc. Image by Paul Hester.  

     

    Above: This Austin hillside house by Lake Flato Architects features a standing seam metal roof made with paint grip steel. Image by Aaron Leitz.

    "Since we often work in mild climates, we love the look of uncoated paint-grip steel," says Rebecca Bruce, an architect with Lake Flato. "Paint grip is steel that has been dipped in a phosphate bath to make it ready for painting, and thus the name. It has a great matte finish that is similar to weathered zinc, but it is much less costly."

    Above: Seattle architects Suyama Peterson Deguchi topped this San Juan Island retreat with a vaulted zinc standing seam roof shell. Image by Paul Warchol.

    Ric Peterson of Suyama Peterson Deguchi chooses zinc roofs whenever possible. "Zinc is possibly a lifetime solution if detailed and installed correctly. Not a housing fashion, zinc stands the test of time and is great aesthetically," he says. Los Angeles architect John Dutton agrees: "The king of roofs for us is Rheinzinc. A nice thing about the metal roof is you can do an integrated gutter."

    Are you an urban dweller in search of a green roof? See Christine's recent Hardscaping 101: Green Roofs on Gardenista, as well as Favorite Summery Green Roofs in the City.  Fixing up your place? Have a look at all our Remodeling 101 posts.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Argentinian architect Martin Gomez Arquitectos, who specializes in beach houses in Uruguay and Argentina, is "obsessed with contextualizing his works within the landscape," he says. This simple, single-story coastal house, set on a grassy knoll overlooking the sea in Punta del Este, gets it just right. See more at Estudio Martin Gomez Arquitectos.

    martin gomez arquitectos exterior

    Above: The wood pavilion overlooks the ocean and captures breezes via sliding doors.  

    Beach House Martin Gomez Arquitectos

    Above: A simple boardwalk leads to the house.

    Beach House Martin Gomez Arquitectos

    Above: The house opens to the outside via a system of sliding glass doors.

    Beach House Martin Gomez Arquitectos

    Above: Sunlight filters through the slatted window shades.

    Martin Gomez Arquitectos Kitchen

    Above: The minimally appointed kitchen opens onto the main living space.

    Martin Gomez Arquitectos kitchen view

    Above: A grouping of classic midcentury seating in the living area. 

    Beach House Martin Gomez Arquitectos

    Above: When the doors are open, the space is almost entirely open to the outdoors.

    Martin Gomez sliding glass door

    Above: Like the leather chairs? For something similar, consult 10 Easy Pieces: South American-Style Leather Chairs.

      Punte del Este Gomez Arquitectos House | Remodelista

    Above: Sleeping quarters are located in a grass-roofed cottage.

    Beach House Martin Gomez Arquitectos

    Above: The bedroom is paneled in white painted shiplap.

    Beach House Martin Gomez Arquitectos

    Above: Furnishings include a bedside table made from reclaimed wood.

    Beach House Martin Gomez Arquitectos

    Above: A marble slab supports a simple ceramic sink.This post is an update; the original ran on June 26, 2013.

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    Last year, Seattle-based Henrybuilt, maker of kitchen systems, launched Opencase, a storage system that caters to a multitude of domestic needs in the kitchen and beyond, including the wine cellar, den, and hall. 

    We just got word that the company has added new Opencase components, making it even more versatile—perfect for those looking to get organized in high style. The caveat is that the components can only be bought as part of the basic system package, and pricing starts at $2,500. For more on the line and the configurations offered, see our previous post, A Storage System for the Whole Home, and visit Henrybuilt.

    Henrybuilt Opencase Mudroom | Remodelista

    Above: The Opencase Mudroom System, which launched last year, features steel shelves and bins, cloth bags that hang on rods, wooden boxes, coat rods, and more. Each of Henrybuilt's systems is adaptable and can be reconfigured for new settings and uses.

    Henrybuilt Opencase storage desk and pouches Remodelista.

    Above: Felt Pockets, initially part of the company's Wardrobe System, have now been incorporated into the Opencase line for storing scarves, hats, and other soft goods.

    Henrybuilt Opencase storage walnut desk | Remodelista.

    Above: This desk in American black walnut is designed to hang from Henrybuilt's panel system, allowing for the creation of small workspaces in kitchens and hallways. 

    Henrybuilt Opencase leather bin| Remodelista

    Above: Ideal for an entry: leather wall pockets for stowing wallets, keys, and phones.

    Henrybuilt Opencase bench| Remodelista

    Above: The Wall Seat is a Henrybuilt favorite. Made of American black walnut and powder-coated steel, the seat can now be integrated into the Opencase System. 

    Hnerybuilt Opencase Pantry | Remodelista

    Above: The Opencase Pantry system features custom wall-mounted panels in a range of sizes and woods, including walnut, oak, ash, and teak.

    For more on Henrybuilt, see our post on the company's Wardrobe System. Go to Storage & Organization for more ideas. And see Gardenista for Storage ideas in the garage and shed.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Exposed copper plumbing aficionados will want to take note of London firm TwistInArchitecture’s use of copper pipes in Trade, a new restaurant and coffee shop on Commercial Street in the city’s East End. Referencing a time in history when the street was home to building merchants and their material yards, copper pipes dominate the warm and welcoming interiors. “We wanted to show that copper pipes normally hidden away inside wall cavities can serve an aesthetic as well as functional role,” says TwistInArchitecture’s co-founder Andreja Beric. Take a look:

    Photography by Dominic Harris.

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: When entering Trade from Commercial Street, the coffee shop is at the front and the restaurant occupies the back. 

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: Backless stainless shelf units hang against textured brick walls.

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: Suspended from the ceiling, copper tubing carries electricty to the pendant lights over the bar. 

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: Copper pipes were used to create a floor-to-ceiling staircase balustrade screen as well as a decorative screen running along the face of the bar.

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: "Copper creates atmosphere through muted reflections and intricate shadows," says Beric. 

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: A balustrade detail offers a look at the way the pipes are connected.

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: The copper is paired with white brick walls and wood finishes. 

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: In the restaurant section, a wood-paneled wall serves as both a design element and an effective way to absorb noise. 

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: A lighting grid of copper pipes provides electricity across the back of the restaurant. 

    Trade Cafe in London by Twist-in-Architecture, Exposed Copper Pipes, Brick Walls | Remodelista

    Above: Trade is located at 47 Commercial Street in Spitalfields, in London's East End. 

    Like the look?  For more inspiration, see 10 Favorites: Exposed Copper Pipes as Decor. And then get to work with Isabella's DIY: The Copper Pipe Curtain Road for $35. On Gardenista, see the beautiful patina of oxidized copper in A Copper-Clad Modernist Gem in the Big Woods

    The map below shows the location of Trade in the East End of London. If you're planning a visit to London, see our City Guides London for more favorite design locations. 

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    Stark white hallways and stairwells get a dose of warmth via natural wood stairs. 

    Wood Stairs Boston | Remodelista

     Above: Ritch Holben of RH Design, photo by Keller + Keller via The Boston Globe.

    John Pawson Dinensen Stairs | Remodelista

    Above: A Dinesen oak staircase by John Pawson.

    Dinesen Wood Staircase | Remodelista

    Above: A minimal white hallway featuring Dinesen floors, via House to Home.

    Wood Staircase | Remodelista

    Above: The Jarego House by CVDB Arquitectos in Cartaxo, Portugal.

    Wood Spiral Staircase | Remodelista

    Above: A modern wooden staircase in a renovation of a historical apartment by Porto, Portugal, firm Ezzo. Photo by Alexandre Delmar.

    Cobble Hill Duplex Oliver Freundlich | Remodelista

    Above: A stairway in Cobble Hill by Oliver Freundlich.

    Pale Wood Staircase | Remodelista

    Above: A simple stairwell in a house by Amsterdam-based i29 Architects

    FMM Architekten Wood Staircase | Remodelista

    Above: A curved wood staircase by Frankfurt-based FFM Architekten.

    Claessen Staircase | Remodelista

    Above: A staircase by Stockholm-based Claesson Koivisto Rune.

    Tato Architects Stairs | Remodelista

    Above: A simple stairway by Tato Architects in Japan.

    Stair crazy? See 10 Space-Saving Modern Staircases and 10 Radical Japanese Staircases.

    More Stories from Remodelista


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    Richard Ostell is a British-born, NYC-based designer with impeccable taste. His interiors manage to achieve that fine balance between being understated and luxurious—and calm and comfortable too. We asked Richard to share his basic design principals for creating simple, calm spaces. As he explains, "It’s all about balance. I love technology and am constantly curious, I just feel we have lost a sense of tranquility in our lives and our homes can be that place." Here are 10 principles that Ostell lives (and works) by.

    Richard Ostell West Village | Remodelista  

    Above: For a West Village townhouse, Richard mixed luxe elements (custom Belgian-linen-covered sofas from Dmitriy & Co.) with casual notes: an artwork nonchalantly pinned to wall.

    Form follows feeling.
    I’ve always believed that form follows function, but when I read this quote—thank you, Illse Crawford!—it captured my own design philosophy. It's an empathetic and sensitive approach to designing objects that's about knowing when something works, when the proportions are right, when what isn’t there is as important as what is. This also applies to my interiors. It’s important to me that a home doesn’t look too done, that it isn’t just a showpiece frozen in time. A home should reflect the people who live in it and the way they live; it has to feel right to them.

    Trust your intuition.

    There is a fabulous TED talk by my old boss, Angela Ahrendts, former CEO of Burberry and the now the head of Apple's retail business, in which she talks about human intelligence, of going with your instincts. She says as a society we value logic and facts more than feelings and that we should learn to trust our intuition more. So often we're too quick to dismiss going with how we feel.

    Richard Ostell Matthias Kaiser vase | Remodelista

    Above: A vase by ceramicist Matthias Kaiser is placed on a rough-hewn wooden shelf. 

    Design for now.
    I’m an Aquarian, so I’m always looking forward, but I believe it’s important to design for now. I think design should be representative of the time in which it's made and interiors should reflect how we live today. That said, I love objects and spaces that have a sense of history and the marks of time: again it comes back to balance, of knowing or feeling when something is right.

    Mix different textures. 
    For me this is instinctive. You never want anything to be one note. Hard and soft, old and new, rough and refined; you need balance and layers. The happy relationship or tension between objects, textures, and space is what I am striving for in all my work be it furniture or interiors.

    Richard Ostell Westchester barn | Remodelista

    Above: Richard creates a simple palette in natural tones by mixing linen, wood, and weathered brick. 

    Use humble materials.
    I have always believed in an honest approach to design, I like to see the craftsmanship in a simple wood joint, I like things to be clear; nothing fake or hidden with extraneous detail.  This quote from Leonard Koren’s book Wabi-Sabi for Artists, Designers, Poets and Philosophers sums up my ideas very well: 

    "But how do you exercise the restraint that simplicity requires without crossing over into ostentatious austerity? How do you pay attention to all the necessary details without becoming excessively fussy? How do you achieve simplicity without inviting boredom? The simplicity of wabi-sabi is probably best described as the state of grace arrived at by a sober, modest, heartfelt intelligence. Pare down to the essence, but don’t remove the poetry. Keep things clean and unencumbered, but don’t sterilize. (Things wabi-sabi are emotionally warm, never cold.) Usually this implies a limited palette of materials. It also means keeping conspicuous features to a minimum. But it doesn’t mean removing the invisible connective tissue that somehow binds the elements into a meaningful whole. It also doesn’t mean in any way diminishing something’s ‘interestingness,’ the quality that compels us to look at something over, and over, and over again." 

    Richard Ostell West Village interior | Remodelista

    Above: In a West Village townhouse with en suite bedroom and bath, worn wood floors are juxtaposed with a Briona Pendant designed by Adolf Loos in 1914.

    Surround yourself with the real deal. 
    When I talk about humble materials I also mean honest, natural materials: wood, stone, plaster, cotton, linen, etc. Materials that age well and develop patina over time. Scuffs and marks on a dining table are a history of all the meals you have shared there. Too many people live in homes that are almost hermetically sealed, filled with synthetic materials and toxic chemicals. (This is true of the food that too many people eat as well.) Open the windows, throw out stuff, and eat real food! Surrounding yourself with honest materials allows your body to breathe and relax.

    Balance the old with the new. 
    People become obsessed with keeping things looking like new, but this is not how the world works; everything ages and I feel we should embrace the beauty in the marks that time makes on objects and our homes. It’s the juxtaposition of old and new that makes things interesting. A sense of history grounds us and ties us to our people. 

    Richard Ostell Westchester Barn| Remodelista

    Above: Richard's white oak dining table and benches are his own design. Handmade in the US, the simple form epitomizes his restrained approach. See A Brit in Milwaukee for a look at the table and bench in Richard's former loft.

    Stick with a natural palette.
    Natural colors and restraint go together in my mind. I have never liked bright colors just as I have never liked clutter or ostentatious decoration. The world we live in (and my mind!) is so fast paced and chaotic that I want the things I surround myself with to be quiet. For me that means fewer things and subtle, harmonious colors.

    Richard-Ostell-pebble-display-Remodelista

    Above: A parade of pebbles displayed on a table.

    Mix styles.
    Mixing periods and styles adds interest. But don’t do it for the sake of decoration; everything in your home should have meaning and be personal. One of my favorite things is a collection of tiny pebbles a dear friend collected on the beach on Fire Island. Each one was carefully chosen and arranged in a line, and seeing it means so much to me. I dislike decoration to fill a space or a wall; that means nothing.

    Practice restraint. 
    I love the word restraint. It’s about a light touch, knowing when to stop, living with less, buying fewer but better things that will last, and keeping only those things that mean something. As I said before, when I am designing a piece of furniture, an object, or a space, it’s as much about what isn’t there as what is. 

    To learn more about Richard's approach to design, see our previous posts: The Quiet Man, Slow Design from Richard Ostell and Steal This Look: Richard Ostell's Westchester Cottage

    Richard Ostell has his own online shop and design business: go to Richard Ostell. He is currently collaborating with a Oaxaca pottery collective on an exclusive line of ceramics using traditional techniques. The pieces will be available on his website and also at his new, by-appointment-only space in the city in the fall. Stay tuned for details. 

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    At New York's ICFF and satellite design shows, amid the big and the bold, we discovered a refreshing undercurrent of summer-camp arts and crafts presented in high-style ways: woven leather baskets, dart lights, chrome oil lamps, and more. Here's what we see on the horizon:

    Apparatus Studio horsehair sconce | Remodelista

    Above: New York studio Apparatus describes its new line of Horsehair Sconces and Pendants as "a robust study of material that evokes the grace and strength of its equine contributor." The lights are Palomino (shown) or Jet horsehair with brass or tarnished silver and etched glass; the sconces are $4,440. Photograph by Ingalls Photography courtesy of Apparatus Studio.

    Deborah Bowness Crystal Wallpaper | Remodelista

    Above: London artist Deborah Bowness specializes in photographic trompe l'oeil wallpaper. Shown here her new Crystal pattern. Did you know that cut glass is looking good again? See Trend Alert: Your Grandmother's Crystal Makes a Comeback. And have a look at more of Bowness's designs in our post Instant Heritage.

    Castor Design Oil Lamp | Remodelista

    Above: Toronto design studio Castor partnered with Canada's oldest gas lamp manufacturer, Harnisch, to create this 21st century Oil Lamp. Part of Castor's new Black Metal line, it's made of plated brass finished in black chrome and uses lamp oil. The lamp will be available in the coming months from Castor. (In the meantime, have a look at Castor's Tube Lights Made from Recycled Fluorescent Bulbs.)

    Ladies and Gentleman Studio Aura Lights | Remodelista

    Above: "We've pared down light into its two elemental ingredients: the source (the bulb) and its illumination (highlighted by a brass ring)," explain Dylan Davis and Jean Lee of Seattle's Ladies and Gentleman Studio. Their Aura Lights are brass with a brass or copper base, and come hardwired with an 8-foot cord for ceiling mounting and a brass canopy; $375 each. See more of their work in Standard Socket Shines a Light in Seattle.

    Fruitsuper Design abacus | Remodelista

    Above: Spotted at Wanted Design: a Perpetual Calendar of porcelain, maple, and brass by Fruitsuper Design, a Seattle industrial design studio. Watch for the calendar at Fruitsuper's online shop.  

    Apparatus Studio Lariat light | Remodelista

    Above: Lariat, another new design by Apparatus, is made of woven brass mesh with teardrop-shaped etched glass shades. It's is available in a series of configurations, including single and triple pendants; prices start at $1,900.

    Byamt Strap Bowl | Remodelista

    Above: Made in Long Beach, CA, by BYAMT in collaboration with Mimot Studio, the Strap Basket is leather with copper-plated rivets; $174. In an earlier post, Izabella presented 5 Favorite Leather Baskets (including one by BYAMT) and then she showed us How to Make a Tray Made from a Piece of Leather. Also have a look at Alexa's DIY: Wall-Mounted Leather Knife Rack and Erin's DIY: Braided Leather Drawer Pulls for $1.25 Each

    Frederick and Mae Dart Lights | Remodelista

    Above: Fredericks & Mae's Lamps are made of hand-turned maple or walnut detailed with colored cotton cord; $280 each. Not coincidentally, the company has also just designed a collection of darts and a dartboard. And have your seen their Modern Take on Worry Beads?

    Brook & Lyn Twilight Hues weaving | Remodelista

    Above: We've been detecting a hippie art revival. Twilight Hues 3 is one of a series of weavings by husband and wife team Mimi Jung and Brian Hurewitz of Brook & Lyn, a design studio that started in Brooklyn and relocated to LA. The tapestry hangs from copper rods and is $4,900. 

    Grain Design pots | Remodelista

    Above: From Grain Design, James and Chelsea Minola's studio on Bainbridge Island: a series of hand-thrown terracotta designs called Grail (each is stamped with Grain's modern hieroglyphics). The covered pot is the Grail Cassoulet with a glazed interior; $295; the Grail Large Pot, $135, can be used as a planter or vase;  and the Grail Small Bowl is $45. See Grain's Strung Pendant lighting design in Standard Socket Shines a Light in Seattle.

    For more of our ICFF finds, have a look at Naomi Paul's Organic Modern Crocheted Lamps from London and today's Gardenista post on Polarmoss.

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    Looking for a patch of green to call your own? This week the Gardenista team  has been visiting inspired balconies and terraces—and fire escapes, too.

    Marie Viljoen's Harlem terrace | Gardenista

    Above: This week's Garden Visit is one of our all-time favorites: 66 Square Feet blogger Marie Viljoen chronicles her not entirely smooth move from Brooklyn to Harlem. This month, she's finally getting things growing—have a look.

    Apiarium prototype | Gardenista

    Above: A Hip Hive for Urban Bees? Allow Justine to fill you in.

    Damian Chivialle urban farm shipping container garden | Gardenista

    Above: Designer Damien Chivialle is on a mission to grow gardens in places where there's nothing but concrete. His Urban Farm Units, Gardenista's Outbuilding of the Week, make inventive use of shipping containers. And how you seen our post on 10 Houses Made from Shipping Containers?

    Reindeer moss "islands" by Polarmoss | Gardenista

    Above: The easiest houseplant has new competition: dried reindeer moss "islands" from Finland, no watering required. (And here are some other low-maintenance options.)

    Fringe Flower Show garden in punt at Leeds Castle |  Gardenista

     Above: A garden on a boat in a moat? Read Kendra's report about the Chelsea Flower Show alternative: Peep Shows, Gin Lovers, and Wildings at the Chelsea Fringe. You'll find us in the gin garden.

    Go to City Mouse to see Gardenista's full issue. 

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    Getting a toehold in London isn't easy, particularly for an architect looking to design his own family home. Hugh Strange presented himself with the challenge of building on a small, oddly scaled pub yard in Deptford. His results have been described as "practical, cost-effective, and exuding humanity and warmth."

    Photographs via Hugh Strange Architects.

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: Hugh Strange preserved the weathered brick perimeter wall that once enclosed a pub. It took him several years to secure permits to build on what had been a neglected urban lot.

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The brick enclosure screens out the street and creates a private wraparound terrace on two sides of the house. Vertical panels of spruce frame the windows and doors. The building's framework was prefabricated in a Swiss factory and driven to the site, enabling the building's skeleton to be erected in a week on a concrete raft foundation that didn't require excavation. In 2011, it won an AIA prize as Best Small Project.

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The 807-square-foot interior is long and narrow with high ceilings and a bank of south-facing windows that make the open setup feel much larger than it is. The walls and ceilings are paneled in a pale wood treated with a Scandinavian wash. (If you like the look, see our posts: Scandi Whitewashed Floors: Before and After and World's Most Beautiful Wood Floors. Also consult the Remodelista book.)

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above:  Living, cooking, and eating all take place in one central space. 

    Strange House London | Remodelista

    Above: Sliding doors open onto the courtyard.

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: In a corner off the kitchen, a single high window frames a view of a church. The floors are polished concrete with radiant heating, an energy-efficient choice. See Remodeling 101: Five Things to Know About Radiant Floor Heating.

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The house was completed in 2011 and an office addition, shown here, was recently finished. It's made of fiber concrete panels with galvanized steel trim.

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: A cobblestone courtyard connects house and office.

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The new quarters of Hugh Strange Architects. Like the house, the office makes inventive use of a long, narrow space. 

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: Built-in bookcases are a signature in the office and house.

    Strange House in London by Hugh Strange Architects | Remodelista

    Above: The office puts white brick to use inside and out.

    Looking for an architect? Go to the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory for our recommendations. And for inspiration, have a look at our Architect Visit posts and Gallery of Rooms and Spaces.

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    What's on our radar this weekend? Read on:

    White cotton hammock for summer | Remodelista

    Seattle Summer House | Remodelista

    Summer White Weekend Bag | Remodelista

    Lemon Thyme Ginger Sparkler | Remodelista

    • Above: Lemon thyme gin sparkler, anyone? Photograph courtesy of Quitokeeto. 
    • School's almost out; keep the kids busy with summer crafts

    Villa Weinberg | Remodelista

    See our Modest Modern issue for the rest of this week's finds. If you're an urbanite or living in a small space, don't miss Gardenista's City Mouse issue. 

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    We're capping off Modest Modern week with a spotlight on the work of LA architecture firm Park McDonald, a recent addition to the Remodelista Architect/Designer Directory. Founded by husband-and-wife team Alice Park and Michael McDonald, this young Los Angeles firm has a penchant for renovating, restoring, and reviving midcentury houses with great sensitivity and care (Frank Lloyd Wright fans, take note of the firm’s renovation of the Millard House). With three historic remodels under their belt and another under construction, the firm feels fortunate to be living in a hotbed of notable modernist architecture. “Our clients are very passionate about design and appreciate what we have here in LA,” says McDonald.

    This weekend, we tour Park McDonald’s renovation of the Schaeffer Residence, designed in 1948 by John Lautner, one of the most important and influential architects of the 20th century. The house, like many of Lautner’s designs, has star quality in the Hollywood sense as well: post renovation it gained new fame as the setting for Tom Ford’s visually memorable film A Single Man starring Colin Firth and Julianne Moore. "Our clients were interested in maintaining the integrity of the design," says McDonald. "The house had changed owners several times since it belonged to the Schaeffers; we helped to bring it back to its original state by introducing a more suitable color palette and complementary furniture." 

    Photographs courtesy of Joe Fletcher from Ranch Houses: Living the California Dream, a Rizzoli book written by David Weingarten and Lucia Howard, and photographed by Joe Fletcher.

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: The house is in the Montrose area of Glendale, California, on a heavily wooded site that is visible through the glassed-in ceiling of the dining room. The vintage dining table and chairs are Jean Prouvé designs, and the wood stools are by Charlotte Perriand. 

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: The two-bedroom, two-bathroom house is a wood-framed construction with some brick walls. It's 1,700 square feet and has an attached two-car carport.  

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: The indoor/outdoor qualities of Southern Californian living are enhanced by large pivot doors. Concrete floors run throughout the house and extend outside. 

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: In the living room, the sofa, chair, and stools are by George Nakashima and are upholstered in Pierre Frey fabric. The rug is from Lost & Found in Los Angeles.

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: "We were not so concerned about replicating the original furnishings of the house," Park says. "Our main goal was to have the furniture complement the space, to become a part of the whole. And when sourcing textiles, we looked for fabrics that would blend in with the house rather than stand out."

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: Daylight washes down the redwood paneling of the living room's feature wall, now newly refinished down to the rock garden at its base.

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: A view from the living room across the open space to the dining room highlights the multi-layered and richly textured materials of the wood, brick, and glass construction.

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: The redwood paneling runs throughout the house, including in the bedrooms.  

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista

    Above: The extensive use of glass throughout is on full display in a bedroom with an original built-in desk.

    Schaeffer Residence designed in 1949 by John Lautner in LA, Park McDonald renovation, Joe Fletcher Photography | Remodelista  

    Above:  The Schaeffer family originally used the property for picnics under the large oak trees, and later decided they wanted to live there permanently. Lautner designed the house around the existing oaks.

    Julianne Moore is a design aficionado herself, and the owner of one of our favorite kitchens: see Behind the Scenes: 5 Design Lessons from Julianne Moore and the Remodelista book. And if you have a weakness for pivot doors, see Architect Visit: Pivot Door Roundup for more. On Gardenista have a look at 10 Landscapes Designed Around a Single Tree.

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    This week we're embracing summer ease, and allowing the lines to blur between day and night, work and play, indoors and out. Join us in celebrating the start of lush living.   

    Above: The ultimate indoor/outdoor space? In today's Architect Visit, watch for this Charleston, South Carolina, design later today, plus its pool pavilion (with outdoor shower) is Tuesday's Steal This Look

    Monday

    Deborah Erhrlich jelly jar light | Remodelista

    Above: Our summer hangout of choice? There's no place nicer than a breezy porch—and in today's Lighting post, we're spotlighting our porch light of choice.

    Tuesday

    Plywood outdoor kitchen | Remodelista

    Above: If you can't stand the heat, cook outside. Tuesday's 10 Easy Pieces is devoted to serious and well-designed outdoor kitchens. (Looking for a bit less of a commitment? For the Best Barbecue Grills and Portable Grills, see Gardenista's picks.)

    Wednesday

      Heather Taylor linen napkin from Nickey Kehoe | Remodelista

    Above: Discovered by Julie on a recent trip to LA: the perfect linen napkins for summer. Read about Heather Taylor's designs (not too fancy but luxurious nonetheless) in Wednesday's Tabletop post.

    Thursday

    Architects' White Exterior Paint Picks | Remodelista

    Above: It's no secret that we're partial to white walls, but which shades of white are ideal for porches and exteriors? In today's Palette & Paints post, Meredith, our resident paint expert, presents architects' exterior white paint picks.

    Friday

    Save the Sea bike bag | Remodelista

    Above: Meet an alternative to the bike basket: clever totes and laptop bags made from recycled sails—Friday's Bicycles post.

    Saturday

    Matiz Architecture and Design New York Apartment | Remodelista

    Above: Custom millwork and cantilevered stairs will be among the topics of discussion in this weekend's Architect Is In, featuring a newly transformed 1817 Greenwich Village townhouse by Matiz Architecture and Design. The architects will be on standby to answer your questions.

    Learn more about Outdoor Living at Gardenista this week.

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    What do you do when you love your house and where you live but your needs have changed? Most people would renovate to accommodate, but in the case of this family in Charleston, South Carolina, they went a step further and started over completely.

    The owners began with a classic bungalow in the Old Village but longed for a more open (read: indoor/outdoor) environment for their young family. After exploring renovation options with architect Heather A. Wilson, they decided to start over and create the lofty, light-filled spaces they really wanted. A dramatic decision, perhaps; but clearly not an impulsive one.

    Interiors by Jen Langston. Photography courtesy of Heather A. Wilson.

    Heather A. Wilson's new build of classic bungalow in Old Village, Charleston, South Carolina, Remodelista

    Above: The new house retains a similar scale and feel to the original bungalow.  Pool and Cabana in Old Village, Charleston, South Carolina by Heather A. Wilson, Architect, Remodelista

    Above: Ceiling fans, an outdoor fireplace, and a hanging daybed all play a part in creating a summery vibe in the house's outdoor areas (stay tuned for the the pool and cabana in tomorrow's Steal This Look).

    Heather A. Wilson's new build of classic bungalow in Charleston, South Carolina, sliding wood barn doors, interior white wood siding, Remodelista

    Above: A large living room with two seating areas face the pool area.

    Heather A. Wilson's new build of classic bungalow in Charleston, South Carolina, sliding wood barn doors, interior white wood siding, Remodelista

    Above: A wide opening into the kitchen allows the kitchen area to be separate and part of the living area the same time.

    Heather A. Wilson's new build of classic bungalow in Charleston, South Carolina, gray kitchen units, Remodelista

    Above: Wood siding creates an intimate scale in the tall ceilinged kitchen.

    Heather A. Wilson's new build of classic bungalow in Charleston, South Carolina, sliding wood barn doors, interior white wood siding, Remodelista

    Above: Large sliding barn doors in the living space create flexible open living.

    Heather A. Wilson's new build of classic bungalow in Charleston, South Carolina, interior white wood siding, Remodelista

    Above: A small room with wine storage acts as a buffer between the living spaces and private spaces.

    Heather A. Wilson's new build of classic bungalow in Charleston, South Carolina, Remodelista

    Above: A small enclosed porch sits off the bungalow's open front porch.

    Heather A. Wilson's new build of classic bungalow in Old Village, Charleston, South Carolina, Remodelista

    Above: Visions of hanging out on the front porch loom large.

    What do you think? I am considering putting wood paneling on the ceilings of the family room of my house in Connecticut to introduce scale and texture into its high ceilinged 1980s interior and looked through 5,000 images (yes, I'm that obsessive) of Wood Paneling in our Gallery of Rooms and Spaces for ideas. Should I do it or not? Let me know what you think in the comments below.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on April 13, 2013 as part of our Bring on the Spring issue.

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    “The idea was a jelly jar,” New York designer Deborah Ehrlich told the New York Times. But Ehrlich's porch light is no ordinary jelly jar light: the shade is hand-blown Swedish crystal, the base is white glazed porcelain, and the fittings are made of rubbed brass.

    Deborah Ehrlich Jelly Jar Porch Light | Remodelista

    Above: The Crystal Jelly Jar Light, which is 4 inches wide and 8 inches high, is $225 at Artware Editions in New York City.

    Deborah Ehrlich Jelly Jar Porch Light | Remodelista

    Above: The light measures 4 inches wide and 8 inches high.

    deborah ehrlich jelly jar light installed

    Above: The profile is traditional yet with a subtle elegance.

    For more of our favorite Lighting, peruse the hundreds of images in our Gallery of Rooms and Spaces, and see 10 Easy Pieces: Porch Lights. On Gardenista, have a look at DIY Lanterns (Made from Mason Jars).

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on April 24, 2013 as part of our Clean Sweep issue.

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    Have a kitchen you're insanely proud of? A bath that's a labor of love? A bedroom that lulls you to sleep? Every day, we show you the spaces we love; now it's your turn to share. 

    Above: Photograph by Liesa Johannssen for Remodelista.

    We're excited to announce that the second Remodelista Considered Design Awards are on the horizon. Our annual contest honors the domestic spaces and design acumen of our readers—design professionals and novices alike—and we'll soon be asking for submissions.

    This is a heads-up to let you know that on Monday, June 9, we'll announce the contest categories, prizes, and rules, along with a new feature: a panel of guest judges (design world luminaries, including several famous names). 

    Our awards program is open to all readers—and we're hoping to see living quarters of all sorts, from tiny rentals to new builds. We'll also have separate categories for the work of professional architects and designer, and gardeners take note that we'll be launching Gardenista's awards program on the same day as Remodelista's.

    So get out your cameras and start thinking about which room(s) you'll submit. Watch for the full details on Monday, June 9.

    Gardenista editor-in-chief Michelle Slatalla's kitchen is pictured above; read about her remodeling adventures in The Unused Kitchen and other Domestic Dispatches

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    Matt Lambert, an Aukland native, New York-based restauranteur Jennifer Vitagliano, and designers Alexander Evangelou and James Waterworth of London-based Alexander Waterworth Interiors are behind the Musket Room in Nolita, one of the prettiest (and leafiest) restaurants in NYC. 

    Photos by Emily Andrews via The Musket Room.

    The Musket Room in NYC, Photography by Emily Anderson | Remodelista

    Above: A live-edge wood bar adds an organic note to the interior while giant leafy arrangements introduce a touch of color to the neutral space.

    The Musket Room in NYC, Photography by Emily Anderson | Remodelista

    Above: An exposed brick wall keeps things rustic.

    The Musket Room in NYC, Photography by Emily Anderson | Remodelista

    Above: Teal upholstered banquettes line one wall.

    The Musket Room in NYC, Photography by Emily Anderson | Remodelista

    Above: Scalloped tiling extends from the bar.

    The Musket Room in NYC, Photography by Emily Anderson | Remodelista

    Above: A view of the patio.

    The Musket Room in NYC, Photography by Emily Anderson | Remodelista

    Above: Lambert grows his own herbs in the rear garden.

    Like the look of Alexander Waterworth's interiors? Check out three more projects by the firm: An Italian Farmhouse (Replete with Pastels)Hally's Parsons Green and Kerbisher & Malt. On Gardenista, discover Brooklyn's Only Flower Shop in a Bar.

    N.B.: This post is an update; the original story ran on August 1, 2013 as part of our Entertaining: Summer Edition issue.

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